Okt 312014
 
This week is Digital Citizenship Week atLos Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). The 900-school district, which is the second-largest in the United States, has implemented a Common Core Technology Projectto meet the newCommon Core State Standards. The standardsrequire integration of digital media and up-to-date technology into the K12 curriculum. As part of the program, each […]]> http://blogs.air-watch.com/2014/10/watch-video-los-angeles-area-schools-closing-digital-divide/feed/ 0 SoftBank Telecom now offers AirWatch EMM in Japan http://blogs.air-watch.com/2014/10/softbank-telecom-now-offers-airwatch-emm-japan/ http://blogs.air-watch.com/2014/10/softbank-telecom-now-offers-airwatch-emm-japan/#comments Wed, 29 Oct 2014 21:00:51 +0000
Okt 302014
 
IT has long debated the merits of public and private cloud. Public cloud allows organizations to gain capacity and scale services on-demand, while private cloud allows companies to maintain control and visibility of business critical applications. But there is one cloud model that stands apart: hybrid cloud. Hybrid cloud provides the best of both worlds: […]]> IT has long debated the merits of public and private cloud. Public cloud allows organizations to gain capacity and scale services on-demand, while private cloud allows companies to maintain control and visibility of business critical applications. But there is one cloud model that stands apart: hybrid cloud.

Hybrid cloud provides the best of both worlds: secure, on-demand access to IT resources with the flexibility to move workloads onsite or offsite to meet specific needs. It&#rsquo;s the security you need in your private cloud with the scalability required of your public cloud. VMware vCloud® Air™ is a dedicated hybrid cloud solution that is versatile, easy to use, and interoperable with your onsite vSphere environment.

There are five key use cases you can evaluate for using hybrid cloud. In our upcoming blog series, we&#rsquo;ll dive deep into each of the following use cases to uncover how you can get started with the hybrid cloud.

Development and Testing

Hybrid cloud provides businesses with the flexibility to gain needed capacity for limited time periods without making capital investments for additional infrastructure.

Extend Existing Applications

With hybrid cloud, businesses can extend current standard packaged applications to the cloud, thereby freeing up onsite resources for more business critical projects

Disaster Recovery

Every organization fears an outage, or outright loss, of business critical information. While onsite disaster recovery solutions can be expensive, preventing businesses from adopting the protection plans they need, hybrid cloud can offer an affordable disaster recovery solution with flexible commitments, capacity, and cost.

Modernize Enterprise Applications

Hybrid cloud offers organizations an easy, scalable and secure platform for enterprise applications built for traditional architectures. Companies can move applications or application tiers offsite, choose to keep sensitive data onsite, and apply existing IT policies to meet the application&#rsquo;s security and compliance requirements.

Create Next-Generation Applications

Hybrid cloud is ideal for cloud-native and mobile applications that are data-intensive and tend to need the elasticity to scale with sudden or unpredictable traffic spikes.

Want to learn more? Watch the below video to learn about the benefits of using hybrid cloud for these top five use cases:

Over the next few months, we&#rsquo;ll discuss these use cases and their impact on the future of IT in further detail. We will also evaluate how vCloud Air can help organizations seamlessly extend their existing data centers to the cloud, while using the same tools and processes they are already familiar with.Follow the vCloud blog to find out more on how you can leverage vCloud Air.

For more information about VMware vCloud Air, visit vCloud.VMware.com.

Don&#rsquo;t forget to follow the vCloud blog with your favorite RSS reader, or follow our social channels at @vCloud and Facebook.com/VMwarevCloud for the latest updates.

Okt 302014
 
We’re missing the excitement of VMworld Europe, so here’s a video throwback for your Thursday.Attendees at VMworld 2014 Europe were invited to participate in the EVO:RAIL Challenge where they were able to gain hands-on experience with the new EVO:RAIL hyper-converged infrastructure appliance. Learn more about the challenge and the technology.
Okt 302014
 
Relisted from a Blue Medora blog. Blue Medora&#rsquo;s 3.4 release of the vC Ops Management Pack for Oracle EM has a new feature designed to make creating dashboards for Oracle RAC clusters easier and better. When looking at a RAC cluster, you might want to aggregate performance metrics about the databases it it. So far […]]> http://blogs.vmware.com/management/2014/10/monitoring-rac-using-blue-medoras-vcops-management-pack-oracle-em.html/feed 0 Cloud Chargeback Part 4 – Compare Your Costs to Public Cloud Alternatives http://blogs.vmware.com/management/2014/10/cloud-chargeback-part-4-compare-costs-public-cloud-alternatives.html?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=cloud-chargeback-part-4-compare-costs-public-cloud-alternatives http://blogs.vmware.com/management/2014/10/cloud-chargeback-part-4-compare-costs-public-cloud-alternatives.html#comments Wed, 29 Oct 2014 10:29:33 +0000
Okt 302014
 

We are very pleased to introduce our new regional director: Peter Klint! He arrived just before VMworld 2014 Europe where he had the chance to introduce himself in personto our community.

Peter has been with VMware for more than 4 years, first as country manager for Denmark/Iceland/Finland and lately as Nordic responsible for GB and Channel. Therefore, becoming regional director of Benelux felt like a natural step for him.

We had the opportunity in Barcelona to ask him a couple of questions.

Why Benelux?
Peter: &#rsquo;I have been living in the Netherlands before during a previous job, so I have some experience with the dutch culture already. I see the Benelux region as an early adopter of the most innovative IT solutions. Therefore it is great to exchange knowledge and work together with partners and customers here towards creating amazing new solutions based on VMware&#rsquo;s technology.&#rdquo;

His plan is to get to know everyone in the region, firstinternally, and after that partners and customers. This in order to strengthen partnerships and customer relations, establishing close connections within the VMware community and create a positive environment that enables collaboration. In his view, only by working together with both customers as well as partners we are able to deliver the highest value to our customer.

What is your personal challenge?
We know Peter is very committed to integrate into the Benelux, so we asked him what his personal challenge is about starting to work here: &#rsquo;While being in the Netherlands and Belgium, I see it as my personal challenge to learn the Dutch language. My wife and my youngest son are going to join me moving to the Netherlands and my son is going to attend a pre-IB track in the Netherlands. So we are very motivated to settle down here and have a very successful time!&#rdquo;

Future of VMware Benelux?
&#rsquo;My overall view for the future of VMware is to establish close collaboration with customers and our partners. Since the technology we offer is becoming increasingly more advanced, it is very important to have close relations to customers and know what their needs are in order to offer the best solutions together with our partners.

Although the Benelux region is seen as a very innovative region when it comes to adopting new technology, with the expanding product portfolio it can sometimes be a challenge to understand which combination of products would fit best. VMware has a large portfolio of products and I believe all products can benefit our customers: check our recent mobility solutions including Horizon and Airwatch as well as our Enterprise management portfolio including vCAC, Loginsight, NSX and EVO:RAIL; We also see an increased interest in our hybrid cloud offerings from our vCloud Air Network partners in Benelux as well as VMware vCloud Air data center offerings out of UK or US, as well as a newly announced Data Center to be launched in Germany.&#rdquo;

Video
At VMworld Europe Peter Klint also had some interviews with some Benelux journalists. Together with Luc Costers,country manager VMware Belux, he had this video interview with Solutions Magazine TV. Enjoy.

Okt 302014
 
By Reg Lo As enterprises make their way along the journey to IT-as-a-Service, CIOs and technology leaders must consider an overhaul of how they run IT – from technology enablement, to the operating model itself. A phased approach to technology enablement, designed as a maturity model, helps provide structure to the journey. Breaking down traditional […]]> By Reg Lo

As enterprises make their way along the journey to IT-as-a-Service, CIOs and technology leaders must consider an overhaul of how they run IT – from technology enablement, to the operating model itself. A phased approach to technology enablement, designed as a maturity model, helps provide structure to the journey. Breaking down traditional IT silos leads to a more functional, service-focused operating model.

Based on years of customer experience, we have developed a three-phased path to ITaaS, as seen in Figure 1. In Phase I, when IT was seen as a cost center, virtualization created dramatic CapEx savings, resulting in more efficient IT production. In Phase II, automation results in faster business production, and implementing management tools improves quality of service and reliability. And in Phase III, IT becomes a service broker, reducing OpEx and increasing agility. In this phase, IT uses an &#rsquo;IT-as-a-Service&#rdquo; approach, focusing on the end-to-end services that support the business mission, and leveraging technologies and sourcing options that make providing those services reliable, agile, flexible and cost-effective.

Figure 1. Enabling Technologies for IT-as-a-Service (ITaaS)

It makes sense, then, that the transformation into an IT-as-a-Service approach requires more than just the enabling technologies. IT needs a new operating model to be successful – a new way of thinking and organizing people and process.

Today, many IT organizations are process-oriented. Their key IT Service Management (ITSM) processes are managed, process owners are identified, and their processes are enabled through an integrated ITSM tool. But a process-oriented approach hasn&#rsquo;t changed how they think about managing the technology silos.

Figure 2. The Evolution of how we Manage IT

Mature IT organizations realize that focusing on managing &#rsquo;end-to-end services&#rdquo; helps them be more customer focused than managing discrete &#rsquo;technology silos.&#rdquo; A service-oriented approach enables IT to link the customer outcome to IT services, to applications, and to the infrastructure. These organizations are defining their services, publishing their service catalog, and establishing service owners.

Many IT leaders also talk about &#rsquo;running IT like a business.&#rdquo; This brings a higher level of maturity to IT, with the same fiscal discipline required to manage a traditional business. This entails economic transparency or even an economic transaction where the business pays IT based on service consumption and IT, in return, commits to delivering a certain service level. In this model, business relationship managers act much like account managers in a commercial IT service provider, i.e. building a strategic relationship with the business.

This transformation from process-oriented, to service-oriented, to running IT like a business, results in a new, IT-as-a-Service (ITaaS) operating model. Another way of looking at this transformation is Figure 3. Note that the progression is not necessarily sequential, e.g. an IT organization may work on elements of becoming service-oriented and running IT like a business simultaneously.

Figure 3. ITaaS Operating Model

Many individuals might recognize elements of service management in the ITaaS IT operating model. While the model builds on service management best practices, it emphasizes service characteristics that are associated with cloud-based XaaS services (where XaaS includes Infrastructure as a Service [IaaS], Platform-as-a-Service [Paas], and Software-as-a-Service [SaaS]). XaaS are characterized by the quality of service being actively managed, services being rapidly provisioned (typically through automation), ability to pay for what you use, elastic capacity, and high availability and resiliency. While service management encourages these characteristics, achieving these characteristics across all IT services is a goal of ITaaS.


Reg Lo is the Director of the Service Management practice for VMware Accelerate Advisory Services

Okt 302014
 

Check out Socialcast&#rsquo;s newest feature additions, fixes, and updates for the month of October*:

1. Exposed Additional Settings in Group and Town Hall Creation Dialog

Over the last few months, we received many requests for some additional features when creating new Socialcast Groups or Town Halls. Many of these features already existed but were hidden behind a &#lsquo;show more&#rsquo; link in each respective new creation dialog and hard for users to find. For example, the option to &#rsquo;Allow members to see questions before they have been answered by a speaker&#rdquo; for Town Halls and the option to &#rsquo;Exclude from Company Stream&#rdquo; for Groups, will be more apparent so you can further customize your members&#rsquo; experience using these features.


Improvements to Town Halls

2. New Town Hall Dashboard

As we continue to enhance our Town Hall functionality we wanted to provide a quick and easy way to keep track of all your upcoming, scheduled Town Halls. That is why we have introduced a new Town Halls Dashboard page, which can be accessed by clicking on the Town Halls icon from the left navigation menu.

From that Dashboard page, users will quickly be able to filter their Town Halls using the following options:

  • All – A list of all Town Halls you will be attending, or have attended. This includes upcoming, active, and archived Town Halls.
  • Attending – A list of Town Halls you will be attending as a member, Speaker, or Moderator. This includes upcoming and active Town Halls.
  • Archived – A list of Town Halls you have attended. This only includes archived Town Halls.
  • Mine – A list of Town Halls you have created. This includes upcoming, active, and archived Town Halls. (This option will only appear if you are a community admin or Town Hall admin.)

We have also made a set of secondary sorting options available for the following: Start Time, Name, Most Questions, Fewest Questions, Most Members, and Fewest Members


3. Added Polling Feature to Town Halls

Many Town Hall Speakers and Moderators have asked to interact with participants by posting polls in the Town Hall stream. Only Speakers or Moderators can add poll options to the discussion. Polls will immediately be visible to all participants once they are posted.


4. Added Files Tab to Town Halls

After much demand, we are happy to announce that we added a Files tab to Town Halls, so users can easily access the collection of files being added under Town Hall posts. The Files tab is located to the right of the Bookmark tab and includes the ability to sort by Name, File Type, and Date Added. Clicking on the actual file will allow you to Download or View Post. The Files tab is available to all members, Moderators, and Speakers of a Town Hall. If the Town Hall is public then the Files tab is available to all members of the community.

If the &#rsquo;Allow members to see questions before they have been answered by a speaker&#rdquo; setting is disabled, community members or Town Hall participants will only be able to see the file posted once the question has been answered by a Speaker of the Town Hall.

5. Generate Reach Extension from Town Halls

We recently allowed admins to let members of their community create Reach extensions for things like Group or Home Streams. We have now extended this functionality to Reach Town Hall extensions as well. To edit these settings, admins can navigate to Admin Settings > Reach > Settings and select the Town Hall Stream option. This feature will be enabled by default. Checking this option will mean that creators of Town Halls will be able to view and select &#rsquo;Embed Town Hall Stream&#rdquo; directly from the Town Hall Settings menu.


Selecting this option will generate the Reach extension Embed Code, along with instructions for embedding the extension into an HTML page. All Town Hall Reach embeds will require authentication and use the default Reach styling.

*Please note that On-Premise clients will receive these features in a future release.

Okt 292014
 
Japanese telecommunications provider SoftBank Telecom announced Wednesday in a press release that it will offer AirWatch Enterprise Mobility Management to its customers. Softbank, whose parent company owns a large share in Chinese e-commerce company Alibaba, will link its own cloud and network services with AirWatch. AirWatch can interoperate with SoftBank Telecom’s services, such as remote […]]> http://blogs.air-watch.com/2014/10/softbank-telecom-now-offers-airwatch-emm-japan/feed/ 0 Introducing AirWatch Mobile Game Changers http://blogs.air-watch.com/2014/10/introducing-airwatch-mobile-game-changers/ http://blogs.air-watch.com/2014/10/introducing-airwatch-mobile-game-changers/#comments Wed, 29 Oct 2014 14:07:15 +0000
Okt 292014
 
With 2015 around the corner, now is the time to begin planning for a successful year ahead. When asked the question, &#rsquo;How is your IT department going to keep up with the speed of business?&#rdquo; The answer may be clear, but the roadmap to get there may not. As we pivot to a Software Defined […]]> With 2015 around the corner, now is the time to begin planning for a successful year ahead. When asked the question, &#rsquo;How is your IT department going to keep up with the speed of business?&#rdquo; The answer may be clear, but the roadmap to get there may not.

As we pivot to a Software Defined world, the need to simplify and automate is imperative, but how? Allow us to reintroduceVMware EVO:RAIL. When it comes to simplifying and automating via SDDC, EVO:RAIL is a scalable Software-Defined Infrastructure building block that delivers compute, networking, storage, and management to empower end-user computing, remote office and branch office environments, and small virtual private clouds. The EVO:RAIL engine that is responsible for deployment, configuration and management activities builds on the proven technology of VMware vSphere, vCenter Server, and VMware Virtual SAN. EVO:RAIL delivers the first HCIA that is 100% powered by VMware software.

Watch the video below to learn more about this ground-breaking product, and be sure to visit the EVO:RAIL product page.

Software-Defined is the future. Let EVO:RAIL help you get there.

The VMware Partner Network Team

Okt 292014
 
By Nathan Small A customer opened a case with us because they experienced an issue where their VMs would simply power off randomly with the following message: “Cannot power on vmserver0424 on esx-esx128.server.company.com. Could not open/create change tracking file” This was not isolated to a group or type of VM. It didn’t matter which VM […]]>

Nathan Small

By Nathan Small

A customer opened a case with us because they experienced an issue where their VMs would simply power off randomly with the following message:

“Cannot power on vmserver0424 on esx-esx128.server.company.com. Could not open/create change tracking file”

This was not isolated to a group or type of VM. It didn’t matter which VM or which cluster. If they attempted to power on the VM immediately following the power off event they observed that sometimes the VM would power up again successfully however other times it would fail to do so until they waited a bit longer.

What I will show you in this blog post is how to troubleshoot this type of problem starting with the logs of the virtual machine, thru the ESX host logs, all the way to vCenter and beyond.

The first thing to do is to review the log file for a virtual machine that powers off in this fashion to try to understand what is causing this to occur. For this example we will take VM in the error message we received from vCenter: vmserver0424:

esx-esx128.server.company.com-2014-10-15–18.56/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmware-6.log

2014-10-05T01:27:02.354Z| vcpu-0| I120: AIOMGR: AIOMgr_OpenWithRetry: Descriptor file ‘/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmserver0424_1-000002.vmdk’ locked (try 0)
2014-10-05T01:27:06.661Z| vcpu-0| I120: AIOMGR: AIOMgr_OpenWithRetry: Descriptor file ‘/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmserver0424_1-000002.vmdk’ locked (try 1)
2014-10-05T01:27:10.973Z| vcpu-0| I120: AIOMGR: AIOMgr_OpenWithRetry: Descriptor file ‘/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmserver0424_1-000002.vmdk’ locked (try 2)
2014-10-05T01:27:15.283Z| vcpu-0| I120: AIOMGR: AIOMgr_OpenWithRetry: Descriptor file ‘/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmserver0424_1-000002.vmdk’ locked (try 3)
2014-10-05T01:27:19.693Z| vcpu-0| I120: AIOMGR: AIOMgr_OpenWithRetry: Descriptor file ‘/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmserver0424_1-000002.vmdk’ locked (try 4)
2014-10-05T01:27:24.002Z| vcpu-0| I120: OBJLIB-FILEBE : FileBEOpen: can’t open ‘/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmserver0424_1-000002.vmdk’ : Failed to lock the file (262146).
2014-10-05T01:27:24.002Z| vcpu-0| I120: DISKLIB-DSCPTR: DescriptorDetermineType: failed to open ‘/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmserver0424_1-000002.vmdk’: 2014-10-05T01:27:24.002Z| vcpu-0| I120: DISKLIB-LINK : “/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmserver0424_1-000002.vmdk” : failed to open (Failed to lock the file).
2014-10-05T01:27:24.002Z| vcpu-0| I120: DISKLIB-CHAIN : “/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmserver0424_1-000002.vmdk” : failed to open (Failed to lock the file).
2014-10-05T01:27:24.002Z| vcpu-0| I120: DISKLIB-LIB : Failed to open ‘/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmserver0424_1-000002.vmdk’ with flags 0xa Failed to lock the file (16392).
2014-10-05T01:27:24.002Z| vcpu-0| I120: DISK: Cannot open disk “/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmserver0424_1-000002.vmdk”: Failed to lock the file (16392).
2014-10-05T01:27:24.002Z| vcpu-0| I120: Msg_Post: Error
2014-10-05T01:27:24.002Z| vcpu-0| I120: [msg.fileio.lock] Failed to lock the file
2014-10-05T01:27:24.002Z| vcpu-0| I120: [msg.disk.noBackEnd] Cannot open the disk ‘/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmserver0424_1-000002.vmdk’ or one of the snapshot disks it depends on.
2014-10-05T01:27:24.002Z| vcpu-0| I120: —————————————-
2014-10-05T01:27:24.015Z| vcpu-0| I120: VMXNET3 user: Ethernet0 Driver Info: version = 833450 gosBits = 2 gosType = 2, gosVer = 24848, gosMisc = 212
2014-10-05T01:27:24.032Z| vcpu-0| I120: Msg_Post: Error
2014-10-05T01:27:24.032Z| vcpu-0| I120: [msg.checkpoint.continuesync.error] An operation required the virtual machine to quiesce and the virtual machine was unable to continue running.
2014-10-05T01:27:24.032Z| vcpu-0| I120: —————————————-
2014-10-05T01:27:24.039Z| vcpu-0| I120: Msg_Post: Error
2014-10-05T01:27:24.039Z| vcpu-0| I120: [msg.poweroff.commitOn] Performing disk cleanup. Cannot power off.
2014-10-05T01:27:24.039Z| vcpu-0| I120: —————————————-
2014-10-05T01:27:24.042Z| vcpu-0| I120: SnapshotVMXConsolidateOnlineCB: nextState = 2 uid 598
2014-10-05T01:27:24.042Z| vcpu-0| I120: Vix: [15205934 mainDispatch.c:3870]: VMAutomation_ReportPowerOpFinished: statevar=3, newAppState=1881, success=1 additionalError=0
2014-10-05T01:27:24.042Z| vcpu-0| I120: Msg_Post: Error
2014-10-05T01:27:24.042Z| vcpu-0| I120: [msg.snapshotVMX.consolidate.cptError] An error occurred while consolidating disks. The virtual machine will be powered off.
2014-10-05T01:27:24.042Z| vcpu-0| I120: —————————————-
2014-10-05T01:27:24.045Z| vcpu-0| I120: Vix: [15205934 vigorCommands.c:548]: VigorSnapshotManagerConsolidateCallback: snapshotErr = Unable to save snapshot file (13:0)
2014-10-05T01:27:24.045Z| vcpu-0| I120: SnapshotVMXConsolidateOnlineCB: Destroying thread 12
2014-10-05T01:27:24.045Z| vcpu-0| I120: Turning off snapshot info cache.
2014-10-05T01:27:24.047Z| vcpu-0| I120: Turning off snapshot disk cache.
2014-10-05T01:27:24.047Z| vcpu-0| I120: SnapshotVMXConsolidateOnlineCB: Done with consolidate
2014-10-05T01:27:24.047Z| vmx| I120: Stopping VCPU threads…

While there are numerous errors reported here they all stem from the fact that after 4 retries the VMM (Virtual Machine Monitor) is unable to open a file it had previous had access to. Since the VMM process is the only process that should be trying to access this file, this behavior is odd as it appears that something else has a lock on this file.

Next power on fails immediately:

2014-10-05T01:49:08.752Z| Worker#1| I120: AIOMGR: AIOMgr_OpenWithRetry: Descriptor file ‘/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmserver0424_1-000002.vmdk’ locked (try 0)
2014-10-05T01:49:13.061Z| Worker#1| I120: AIOMGR: AIOMgr_OpenWithRetry: Descriptor file ‘/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmserver0424_1-000002.vmdk’ locked (try 1)
2014-10-05T01:49:17.371Z| Worker#1| I120: AIOMGR: AIOMgr_OpenWithRetry: Descriptor file ‘/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmserver0424_1-000002.vmdk’ locked (try 2)
2014-10-05T01:49:21.680Z| Worker#1| I120: AIOMGR: AIOMgr_OpenWithRetry: Descriptor file ‘/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmserver0424_1-000002.vmdk’ locked (try 3)
2014-10-05T01:49:26.017Z| Worker#1| I120: AIOMGR: AIOMgr_OpenWithRetry: Descriptor file ‘/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmserver0424_1-000002.vmdk’ locked (try 4)
2014-10-05T01:49:30.330Z| Worker#1| I120: OBJLIB-FILEBE : FileBEOpen: can’t open ‘/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmserver0424_1-000002.vmdk’ : Failed to lock the file (262146).
2014-10-05T01:49:30.330Z| Worker#1| I120: DISKLIB-DSCPTR: DescriptorDetermineType: failed to open ‘/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmserver0424_1-000002.vmdk’: Failed to lock the file (40002)
2014-10-05T01:49:30.330Z| Worker#1| I120: DISKLIB-LINK : “/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmserver0424_1-000002.vmdk” : failed to open (Failed to lock the file).
2014-10-05T01:49:30.330Z| Worker#1| I120: DISKLIB-CHAIN : “/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmserver0424_1-000002.vmdk” : failed to open (Failed to lock the file).
2014-10-05T01:49:30.330Z| Worker#1| I120: DISKLIB-LIB : Failed to open ‘/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmserver0424_1-000002.vmdk’ with flags 0xa Failed to lock the file (16392).
2014-10-05T01:49:30.330Z| Worker#1| I120: DISK: Cannot open disk “/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmserver0424_1-000002.vmdk”: Failed to lock the file (16392).
2014-10-05T01:49:30.330Z| Worker#1| I120: Msg_Post: Error
2014-10-05T01:49:30.330Z| Worker#1| I120: [msg.fileio.lock] Failed to lock the file
2014-10-05T01:49:30.330Z| Worker#1| I120: [msg.disk.noBackEnd] Cannot open the disk ‘/vmfs/volumes/529e2483-9ab715a8-afb5-0017a477208a/vmserver0424/vmserver0424_1-000002.vmdk’ or one of the snapshot disks it depends on.

Let’s take another VM as an example and find out why the VMM process is unable to open the file:

esx-esx134.server.company.com-2014-10-15–16.45/vmfs/volumes/52d076c8-5d86489a-880a-0017a477208a/vmserver0420/vmware-5.log

“2014-09-30T05:58:52.233Z| vcpu-0| I120: DISKLIB-LIB : Failed to open ‘/vmfs/volumes/52d076c8-5d86489a-880a-0017a477208a/vmserver0420/vmserver0420_1-000002.vmdk’ with flags 0xa Failed to lock the file (16392).”

When an attempt to access a file fails we may see corresponding events in /var/log/vmkernel.log. The above VM observed an inability to open the file @ 05:58:52 UTC:

/var/log/vmkernel.log:

2014-09-30T05:58:48.229Z cpu4:6413913)DLX: 3661: vol ‘Production-B-Datastore-14′, lock at 216551424: [Req mode 2] Checking liveness:
2014-09-30T05:58:48.229Z cpu4:6413913)[type 10c00001 offset 216551424 v 10376, hb offset 3284992
gen 5, mode 1, owner 52cb3769-8777cf73-e99e-0017a4772890 mtime 71328484
num 0 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]
2014-09-30T05:58:52.233Z cpu4:6413913)DLX: 4185: vol ‘Production-B-Datastore-14′, lock at 216551424: [Req mode: 2] Not free:
2014-09-30T05:58:52.233Z cpu4:6413913)[type 10c00001 offset 216551424 v 10376, hb offset 3284992
gen 5, mode 1, owner 52cb3769-8777cf73-e99e-0017a4772890 mtime 71328484
num 0 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]
2014-09-30T05:58:53.109Z cpu22:9723)DLX: 3661: vol ‘Production-B-Datastore-14′, lock at 216551424: [Req mode 1] Checking liveness:
2014-09-30T05:58:53.109Z cpu22:9723)[type 10c00001 offset 216551424 v 10376, hb offset 3284992
gen 5, mode 1, owner 52cb3769-8777cf73-e99e-0017a4772890 mtime 71328484
num 0 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]

These messages indicate that we are checking the liveness of a file lock on volume ‘Production-B-Datastore-14′ to see if it is stale and can be freed. 4 seconds later we can see that the lock has not been freed yet.

If we take the lock address “216551424″ and looks this up in the VMFS metadata then we would learn that the file in question is ‘vmserver0420_1-000002.vmdk’. More importantly we can see the UUID of the ESX host that has the open lock, which is owner ’52cb3769-8777cf73-e99e-0017a4772890′. In order to determine which physical ESX server this is you need to take that last part of the UUID which is the MAC address of the first vmkernel port (vmk0). We can do this across the ESX host log bundles with the following command:

grep “00:17:a4:77:28:90″ esx-esx*/commands/nicinfo*
esx-esx130.server.company.com-2014-10-15–16.50/commands/nicinfo.sh.txt:vmnic0 0000:004:00.0 be2net Up 10000 Full 00:17:a4:77:28:90 9000 Emulex Corporation HP FlexFabric 10Gb 2-port 554FLB Adapter

Unfortunately the vmkernel logs on this host do not go back far enough to see the timeframe in question however a very strange behavior observed in the /var/log/vmkernel.log:

2014-10-12T10:09:56.885Z cpu15:23596544)FS3: 1250: vol ‘PCI-Migration’, lock at 47935488: [Req mode: 1] Checking liveness:
2014-10-12T10:09:56.885Z cpu15:23596544)[type 10c00001 offset 47935488 v 1704, hb offset 3284992
gen 42893, mode 2, owner 00000000-00000000-0000-000000000000 mtime 662559
num 1 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]
2014-10-12T10:09:56.903Z cpu23:9880)FS3: 1250: vol ‘PCI-Migration’, lock at 55998464: [Req mode: 1] Checking liveness:
2014-10-12T10:09:56.903Z cpu23:9880)[type 10c00001 offset 55998464 v 2941, hb offset 3284992
gen 42893, mode 2, owner 00000000-00000000-0000-000000000000 mtime 1860122
num 1 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]
2014-10-12T10:09:56.915Z cpu25:23303194)DLX: 3661: vol ‘Production-B-Datastore-14′, lock at 194387968: [Req mode 1] Checking liveness:
2014-10-12T10:09:56.915Z cpu25:23303194)[type 10c00001 offset 194387968 v 283, hb offset 3284992
gen 5, mode 2, owner 00000000-00000000-0000-000000000000 mtime 3146551
num 1 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]
2014-10-12T10:09:57.677Z cpu6:9875)FS3: 1393: vol ‘PCI-Migration’, lock at 47556608: [Req mode: 1] Not free:
2014-10-12T10:09:57.677Z cpu6:9875)[type 10c00001 offset 47556608 v 1880, hb offset 3284992
gen 42893, mode 2, owner 00000000-00000000-0000-000000000000 mtime 661885
num 1 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]

The vmkernel logs are completely filled with these lock holder messages which is why the log file had rotated so fast:

2014-10-12T09:46:28.305Z cpu2:9878)DLX: 3661: vol ‘Production-B-Datastore-8′, lock at 232120320: [Req mode 1] Checking liveness:
2014-10-12T09:46:28.305Z cpu2:9878)[type 10c00001 offset 232120320 v 9052, hb offset 3284992
gen 5, mode 2, owner 00000000-00000000-0000-000000000000 mtime 2863190
num 1 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]
2014-10-12T09:46:28.514Z cpu2:9868)DLX: 4185: vol ‘Production-B-Datastore-14′, lock at 193937408: [Req mode: 1] Not free:
2014-10-12T09:46:28.514Z cpu2:9868)[type 10c00001 offset 193937408 v 1488, hb offset 3284992
gen 5, mode 2, owner 00000000-00000000-0000-000000000000 mtime 3125883
num 1 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]
2014-10-12T09:46:28.527Z cpu2:9868)DLX: 3661: vol ‘Production-B-Datastore-14′, lock at 194019328: [Req mode 1] Checking liveness:
2014-10-12T09:46:28.527Z cpu2:9868)[type 10c00001 offset 194019328 v 1769, hb offset 3428352
gen 5, mode 2, owner 00000000-00000000-0000-000000000000 mtime 3124506
num 1 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]
2014-10-12T09:46:28.540Z cpu2:24477994)DLX: 4185: vol ‘Production-B-Datastore-14′, lock at 194785280: [Req mode: 1] Not free:
2014-10-12T09:46:28.540Z cpu2:24477994)[type 10c00001 offset 194785280 v 1901, hb offset 3284992
gen 5, mode 2, owner 00000000-00000000-0000-000000000000 mtime 3124798
num 1 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]
2014-10-12T09:46:28.628Z cpu2:24477994)DLX: 3661: vol ‘Production-B-Datastore-14′, lock at 194791424: [Req mode 1] Checking liveness:
2014-10-12T09:46:28.628Z cpu2:24477994)[type 10c00001 offset 194791424 v 1909, hb offset 3284992
gen 5, mode 2, owner 00000000-00000000-0000-000000000000 mtime 3125256
num 1 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]
2014-10-12T09:46:28.864Z cpu4:9879)DLX: 4185: vol ‘Production-B-Datastore-14′, lock at 194242560: [Req mode: 1] Not free:
2014-10-12T09:46:28.864Z cpu4:9879)[type 10c00001 offset 194242560 v 1168, hb offset 3284992
gen 5, mode 2, owner 00000000-00000000-0000-000000000000 mtime 3124979
num 1 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]
2014-10-12T09:46:28.983Z cpu4:9879)DLX: 3661: vol ‘Production-B-Datastore-14′, lock at 194248704: [Req mode 1] Checking liveness:
2014-10-12T09:46:28.983Z cpu4:9879)[type 10c00001 offset 194248704 v 1186, hb offset 3284992
gen 5, mode 2, owner 00000000-00000000-0000-000000000000 mtime 3125436
num 1 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]
2014-10-12T09:46:29.240Z cpu15:23764342)FS3: 1393: vol ‘PCI-Migration’, lock at 46905344: [Req mode: 1] Not free:
2014-10-12T09:46:29.240Z cpu15:23764342)[type 10c00001 offset 46905344 v 2160, hb offset 3284992
gen 42893, mode 2, owner 00000000-00000000-0000-000000000000 mtime 662629
num 1 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]

Here we can see numerous lock checking for different datastore names and file lock addresses, all within the same second. It appears that this host is aggressively trying to check file lock liveliness, which is certainly unusual behavior.

Let’s review another VM that powered off in another cluster to see if the behavior is the same across clusters:

esx-esx0040.server.company.com-2014-10-21–20.20/vmfs/volumes/53694ec4-999f3bd0-156a-9c8e9920e2b0:
VM: vmserver0260

2014-10-17T13:59:27.457Z| vmx| I120: DISKLIB-LIB : Resuming change tracking.
2014-10-17T13:59:27.461Z| vmx| I120: DISKLIB-CBT : Initializing ESX kernel change tracking for fid 337992562.
2014-10-17T13:59:27.462Z| vmx| I120: DISKLIB-CBT : Successfuly created cbt node 18605b78-cbt.
2014-10-17T13:59:27.462Z| vmx| I120: DISKLIB-CBT : Opening cbt node /vmfs/devices/cbt/18605b78-cbt
2014-10-17T13:59:27.462Z| vmx| I120: DISKLIB-LIB : Opened “/vmfs/volumes/53694ec4-999f3bd0-156a-9c8e9920e2b0/vmserver0260/vmserver0260_5-000002.vmdk” (flags 0xa, type vmfs).
2014-10-17T13:59:27.462Z| vmx| I120: DISK: Disk ‘/vmfs/volumes/53694ec4-999f3bd0-156a-9c8e9920e2b0/vmserver0260/vmserver0260_5-000002.vmdk’ has UUID ’60 00 c2 97 27 69 c9 e3-e4 0f 02 13 a1 6d 4c 6d’
2014-10-17T13:59:27.462Z| vmx| I120: DISK: OPEN ‘/vmfs/volumes/53694ec4-999f3bd0-156a-9c8e9920e2b0/vmserver0260/vmserver0260_5-000002.vmdk’ Geo (1697/255/63) BIOS Geo (0/0/0)
2014-10-17T13:59:31.456Z| Worker#0| I120: DISKLIB-CTK : Could not open tracking file. File open returned IO error 4.
2014-10-17T13:59:31.456Z| Worker#0| I120: DISKLIB-CTK : Could not open change tracking file “/vmfs/volumes/53694ec4-999f3bd0-156a-9c8e9920e2b0/vmserver0260/vmserver0260-000002-ctk.vmdk”: Could not open/create change tracking file.
2014-10-17T13:59:31.458Z| Worker#0| I120: DISKLIB-LIB : Could not open change tracker /vmfs/volumes/53694ec4-999f3bd0-156a-9c8e9920e2b0/vmserver0260/vmserver0260-000002-ctk.vmdk: Could not open/create change tracking file.
2014-10-17T13:59:31.461Z| Worker#0| I120: DISKLIB-VMFS : “/vmfs/volumes/53694ec4-999f3bd0-156a-9c8e9920e2b0/vmserver0260/vmserver0260-000002-delta.vmdk” : closed.
2014-10-17T13:59:31.462Z| Worker#0| I120: DISKLIB-VMFS : “/vmfs/volumes/53694ec4-999f3bd0-156a-9c8e9920e2b0/vmserver0260/vmserver0260-000001-delta.vmdk” : closed.
2014-10-17T13:59:31.464Z| Worker#0| I120: DISKLIB-VMFS : “/vmfs/volumes/53694ec4-999f3bd0-156a-9c8e9920e2b0/vmserver0260/vmserver0260-flat.vmdk” : closed.
2014-10-17T13:59:31.464Z| Worker#0| I120: DISKLIB-LIB : Failed to open ‘/vmfs/volumes/53694ec4-999f3bd0-156a-9c8e9920e2b0/vmserver0260/vmserver0260-000002.vmdk’ with flags 0xa Could not open/create change tracking file (2108).
2014-10-17T13:59:31.464Z| Worker#0| I120: DISK: Cannot open disk “/vmfs/volumes/53694ec4-999f3bd0-156a-9c8e9920e2b0/vmserver0260/vmserver0260-000002.vmdk”: Could not open/create change tracking file (2108).
2014-10-17T13:59:31.467Z| vmx| I120: DISK: Opening disks took 4051 ms.

This error message is slightly different as this time the concern is the change block tracking file instead of the delta snapshot file. Let’s see if the vmkernel.log has the same events:

vmkernel.log:

2014-10-17T13:59:27.454Z cpu18:16729934)DLX: 3733: vol ‘Non-Production-A-Datastore-VMFS5-4′, lock at 71542784: [Req mode 1] Checking liveness:
2014-10-17T13:59:27.454Z cpu18:16729934)[type 10c00001 offset 71542784 v 37061, hb offset 3190784
gen 3, mode 1, owner 53e0181c-c8a6435e-55b0-0017a4770c24 mtime 28048957
num 0 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]
2014-10-17T13:59:27.462Z cpu12:16729808)CBT: 2214: Created device 18605b78-cbt for cbt driver with filehandle 408968056
2014-10-17T13:59:27.462Z cpu12:16729808)WARNING: CBT: 2039: Unsupported ioctl 60
2014-10-17T13:59:27.462Z cpu12:16729808)WARNING: CBT: 2039: Unsupported ioctl 59
2014-10-17T13:59:31.456Z cpu18:16729934)DLX: 4262: vol ‘Non-Production-A-Datastore-VMFS5-4′, lock at 71542784: [Req mode: 1] Not free:
2014-10-17T13:59:31.456Z cpu18:16729934)[type 10c00001 offset 71542784 v 37061, hb offset 3190784
gen 3, mode 1, owner 53e0181c-c8a6435e-55b0-0017a4770c24 mtime 28048957
num 0 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]

When crosschecking the lock @ address “71542784″ on volume ‘Non-Production-A-Datastore-VMFS5-4′ we see that the file in question is ‘vmserver0260-000002-ctk.vmdk’

Now we need to determine which ESX host is the owner of that lock that will not free. Please see KB 10051 for more information: http://kb.vmware.com/kb/10051

grep “00:17:a4:77:0c:24″ esx-esx0*/commands/nicinfo*
esx-esx0044.server.company.com-2014-10-21–17.31/commands/nicinfo.sh.txt:vmnic0 0000:002:00.0 elxnet Up 10000 Full 00:17:a4:77:0c:24 1500 Emulex Corporation HP NC553i Dual Port
FlexFabric 10Gb Converged Network Adapter

When we review the /var/log/vmkernel.log of host ‘esx0044.server.company.com’ we see a flood of lock holder checks on this host too:

2014-10-21T17:26:35.283Z cpu14:35211)DLX: 4262: vol ‘Non-Production-A-Datastore-VMFS5-17′, lock at 71235584: [Req mode: 1] Not free:
2014-10-21T17:26:35.283Z cpu14:35211)[type 10c00001 offset 71235584 v 301, hb offset 3907584
gen 5, mode 2, owner 00000000-00000000-0000-000000000000 mtime 13817937
num 1 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]
2014-10-21T17:26:38.265Z cpu4:135822)DLX: 4262: vol ‘Non-Production-A-Datastore-VMFS5-15′, lock at 262238208: [Req mode: 1] Not free:
2014-10-21T17:26:38.265Z cpu4:135822)[type 10c00001 offset 262238208 v 9643, hb offset 3674112
gen 5, mode 1, owner 53e11584-d51063de-48a9-9c8e99227ee8 mtime 7918228
num 0 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]
2014-10-21T17:26:38.314Z cpu13:7072422)DLX: 4262: vol ‘Non-Production-A-Datastore-VMFS5-16′, lock at 130293760: [Req mode: 1] Not free:
2014-10-21T17:26:38.314Z cpu13:7072422)[type 10c00001 offset 130293760 v 10072, hb offset 3989504

2014-10-21T17:26:39.361Z cpu14:35211)DLX: 4262: vol 'Non-Production-A-Datastore-VMFS5-17', lock at 71241728: [Req mode: 1] Not free:
2014-10-21T17:26:39.361Z cpu14:35211)[type 10c00001 offset 71241728 v 363, hb offset 3907584
gen 5, mode 2, owner 00000000-00000000-0000-000000000000 mtime 13817934
num 1 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]
2014-10-21T17:26:40.070Z cpu20:81812)World: 14296: VC opID hostd-4320 maps to vmkernel opID f2f9cb96
2014-10-21T17:26:42.283Z cpu4:135822)DLX: 4262: vol ‘Non-Production-A-Datastore-VMFS5-15′, lock at 262311936: [Req mode: 1] Not free:
2014-10-21T17:26:42.283Z cpu4:135822)[type 10c00001 offset 262311936 v 7749, hb offset 3674112
gen 5, mode 2, owner 00000000-00000000-0000-000000000000 mtime 7917330
num 1 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]
2014-10-21T17:26:42.350Z cpu14:7072422)DLX: 4262: vol ‘Non-Production-A-Datastore-VMFS5-16′, lock at 130297856: [Req mode: 1] Not free:
2014-10-21T17:26:42.350Z cpu14:7072422)[type 10c00001 offset 130297856 v 10081, hb offset 3989504
gen 3, mode 1, owner 53e3b83d-2b1da026-14d6-0017a4770826 mtime 10085761
num 0 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]
2014-10-21T17:26:43.442Z cpu20:35211)DLX: 4262: vol ‘Non-Production-A-Datastore-VMFS5-17′, lock at 71247872: [Req mode: 1] Not free:
2014-10-21T17:26:43.442Z cpu20:35211)[type 10c00001 offset 71247872 v 330, hb offset 3190784
gen 5, mode 2, owner 00000000-00000000-0000-000000000000 mtime 13817948
num 1 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]
2014-10-21T17:26:46.322Z cpu0:135822)DLX: 4262: vol ‘Non-Production-A-Datastore-VMFS5-15′, lock at 262320128: [Req mode: 1] Not free:
2014-10-21T17:26:46.322Z cpu0:135822)[type 10c00001 offset 262320128 v 7757, hb offset 3674112
gen 5, mode 2, owner 00000000-00000000-0000-000000000000 mtime 7917344
num 1 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]
2014-10-21T17:26:46.357Z cpu17:7072422)DLX: 4262: vol ‘Non-Production-A-Datastore-VMFS5-16′, lock at 129902592: [Req mode: 1] Not free:
2014-10-21T17:26:46.357Z cpu17:7072422)[type 10c00001 offset 129902592 v 10080, hb offset 3989504
gen 3, mode 1, owner 53e3b83d-2b1da026-14d6-0017a4770826 mtime 10085764
num 0 gblnum 0 gblgen 0 gblbrk 0]

Now we need to determine what process or ‘world’ on this host is requesting whether a lock is stale. When we check world ’35211′ we learn that it is process ‘vpxa-wroker’. Why is vpxa-worker trying to open files? What is vpxa-worker trying to do in general? Let’s take a look at the /var/log/vpxa.log file for more information:

2014-10-21T17:34:40.090Z [FFFD4B70 info 'commonvpxLro' opID=190a874-bf] [VpxLRO] — BEGIN task-internal-375725 — – vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore — 04fe2fb8-71f9-c0a4-d42c-2812b96c7fb6
2014-10-21T17:34:40.090Z [FFFD4B70 verbose 'vpxavpxaMoService' opID=190a874-bf] SearchDatastore: ds:///vmfs/volumes/53f257d5-11293746-04b5-0017a477084e/ true [N3Vim4Host16DatastoreBrowser10SearchSpecE:0x1f3d72f8]
2014-10-21T17:34:40.090Z [FFFD4B70 verbose 'vpxavpxaDatastoreContext' opID=190a874-bf] [VpxaDatastoreContext] Resolved URL ds:///vmfs/volumes/53f257d5-11293746-04b5-0017a477084e/ to localPath /vmfs/volumes/53f257d5-11293746-04b5-0017a477084e/
2014-10-21T17:34:40.124Z [FFFD4B70 info 'vpxavpxaVmprov' opID=190a874-bf] [VpxaVmprovUtil::IsTopLevelObjectStorePath] path /vmfs/volumes/53f257d5-11293746-04b5-0017a477084e/ has fstype: 62768
2014-10-21T17:34:40.124Z [FFFD4B70 verbose 'vpxavpxaVmprovUtil' opID=190a874-bf] [VpxaVmprovUtil] UrlToDatastoreUrl conversion: ds:///vmfs/volumes/53f257d5-11293746-04b5-0017a477084e/ -> ds:///vmfs/volumes/53f257d5-11293746-04b5-0017a477084e/
2014-10-21T17:34:40.728Z [24983B70 info 'Libs' opID=1faf940d-66] OBJLIB-FILEBE : FileBEOpen: can’t open ‘/vmfs/volumes/53f25ab0-c16dcbc9-b38e-0017a477084e/fldcvisla0007/fldcvisla0007_1-flat.vmdk’ : Failed to lock the file (262146).
2014-10-21T17:34:40.728Z [24983B70 info 'DiskLib' opID=1faf940d-66] DISKLIB-DSCPTR: DescriptorOpenInt: failed to open ‘/vmfs/volumes/53f25ab0-c16dcbc9-b38e-0017a477084e/fldcvisla0007/fldcvisla0007_1-flat.vmdk’: Failed to lock the file (40002)
2014-10-21T17:34:40.728Z [24983B70 info 'DiskLib' opID=1faf940d-66] DISKLIB-LINK : “/vmfs/volumes/53f25ab0-c16dcbc9-b38e-0017a477084e/fldcvisla0007/fldcvisla0007_1-flat.vmdk” : failed to open (Failed to lock the file).
2014-10-21T17:34:40.731Z [24983B70 verbose 'Default' opID=1faf940d-66] [Search::GetInfo] Successfully opened disk: /vmfs/volumes/53f25ab0-c16dcbc9-b38e-0017a477084e/fldcvisla0007/fldcvisla0007_1.vmdk
2014-10-21T17:34:40.803Z [24983B70 info 'DiskLib' opID=1faf940d-66] DISKLIB-LINK : “/vmfs/volumes/53f25ab0-c16dcbc9-b38e-0017a477084e/fldcvisla0007/fldcvisla0007_1-ctk.vmdk” : failed to open (The file specified is not a virtual disk).

Why is the vpxa process kicking off ‘vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore’ API requests? It is attempting to open a lot of different vmdk files which is failing because they are locked, likely because those virtual machines are running on other hosts. What is interesting it is attempting to open change block track files as well except it is trying to open them as virtual machine disks however these not actual virtual machine disks and merely ctk files. Yet again, very odd behavior. At this point I suspect that these API calls are likely coming from a 3rd party piece of software and not something native to our product. Let’s check the vCenter logs for more information:

2014-05-20T20:45:40.137-04:00 [08928 warning 'VpxProfiler' opID=1ea7d388] ClientAdapterBase::InvokeOnSoap: (esx130.server.company.com, vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore) [SoapRpcTime] took 89590 ms
2014-05-20T20:45:40.137-04:00 [08928 info 'vpxdvpxdVmomi' opID=1ea7d388] [ClientAdapterBase::InvokeOnSoap] Invoke done (esx130.server.company.com, vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore)
2014-05-20T20:45:44.583-04:00 [09416 warning 'VpxProfiler' opID=43475cf] ClientAdapterBase::InvokeOnSoap: (esx130.server.company.com, vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore) [SoapRpcTime] took 163645 ms
2014-05-20T20:45:44.583-04:00 [09416 info 'vpxdvpxdVmomi' opID=43475cf] [ClientAdapterBase::InvokeOnSoap] Invoke done (esx130.server.company.com, vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore)
2014-05-20T20:45:48.982-04:00 [09424 warning 'VpxProfiler' opID=eba32ae4] ClientAdapterBase::InvokeOnSoap: (esx098.server.company.com, vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore) [SoapRpcTime] took 129044 ms
2014-05-20T20:45:48.982-04:00 [09424 info 'vpxdvpxdVmomi' opID=eba32ae4] [ClientAdapterBase::InvokeOnSoap] Invoke done (esx098.server.company.com, vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore)
2014-05-20T20:46:12.958-04:00 [07708 warning 'VpxProfiler' opID=632083eb] ClientAdapterBase::InvokeOnSoap: (esx098.server.company.com, vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore) [SoapRpcTime] took 182271 ms
2014-05-20T20:46:12.958-04:00 [07708 info 'vpxdvpxdVmomi' opID=632083eb] [ClientAdapterBase::InvokeOnSoap] Invoke done (esx098.server.company.com, vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore)
2014-05-20T20:46:18.465-04:00 [09412 warning 'VpxProfiler' opID=6d6d6500] ClientAdapterBase::InvokeOnSoap: (esx098.server.company.com, vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore) [SoapRpcTime] took 193924 ms
2014-05-20T20:46:18.465-04:00 [09412 info 'vpxdvpxdVmomi' opID=6d6d6500] [ClientAdapterBase::InvokeOnSoap] Invoke done (esx098.server.company.com, vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore)
2014-05-20T20:47:41.128-04:00 [08808 warning 'VpxProfiler' opID=ecaec22f] ClientAdapterBase::InvokeOnSoap: (esx130.server.company.com, vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore) [SoapRpcTime] took 252143 ms
2014-05-20T20:47:41.128-04:00 [08808 info 'vpxdvpxdVmomi' opID=ecaec22f] [ClientAdapterBase::InvokeOnSoap] Invoke done (esx130.server.company.com, vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore)
2014-05-20T20:48:28.925-04:00 [04168 warning 'VpxProfiler' opID=a5dad99f] ClientAdapterBase::InvokeOnSoap: (esx098.server.company.com, vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore) [SoapRpcTime] took 251114 ms

We can see the runtime of these API calls to be 90, 163, 129, 182, 193, 252, and 251 seconds respectively. This is a REALLY long time for a search and if this is holding vmdk or ctk files open this long then the retry time of the VMM process that runs the VM would expire and then VM would power off. Now we need to determine who is issuing these API calls.

Let’s review the vpxd-profiler logs on vCenter to figure out where these searches are originating from:

–> ThreadState/ThreadId/1668/State/TASK::session[ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8]52e5e352-3b0f-9f06-96b2-bc8a7d49d548::datastore-3262::vim.host.DatastoreBrowser.searchSubFolders::ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8(520b34e4-8a51-6
974-c44b-a0c67f1913a8)/State/RPC::vpxapi.VpxaService:vpxa::esx098.server.company.com::vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore
–> ThreadState/ThreadId/3292/State/TASK::session[ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8]52b7e9ee-a68d-f05a-569b-469c8f782287::datastore-2840::vim.host.DatastoreBrowser.searchSubFolders::ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8(520b34e4-8a51-6
974-c44b-a0c67f1913a8)/State/RPC::vpxapi.VpxaService:vpxa::esx130.server.company.com::vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore
–> ThreadState/ThreadId/3988/State/WAITING_VPX_MUTEX::EventManager::EventBatchAppender
–> ThreadState/ThreadId/5932/State/WAITING_VPX_MUTEX::QuickStatsResultQueue
–> ThreadState/ThreadId/7528/State/WAITING_VPX_MUTEX::QuickStatsResultQueue
–> ThreadState/ThreadId/7676/State/TASK::session[ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8]5213f5de-1ade-5f03-1dff-c052e1128069::datastore-2896::vim.host.DatastoreBrowser.searchSubFolders::ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8(520b34e4-8a51-6974-c44b-a0c67f1913a8)/State/RPC::vpxapi.VpxaService:vpxa::esx098.server.company.com::vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore
–> ThreadState/ThreadId/7712/State/TASK::session[ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8]52f10aba-19f4-effe-e45a-b01b7a46920a::datastore-2837::vim.host.DatastoreBrowser.searchSubFolders::ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8(520b34e4-8a51-6974-c44b-a0c67f1913a8)/State/RPC::vpxapi.VpxaService:vpxa::esx098.server.company.com::vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore
–> ThreadState/ThreadId/8296/State/TASK::session[ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8]521f2165-f9a1-5da3-3aee-602d3252451c::datastore-2883::vim.host.DatastoreBrowser.searchSubFolders::ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8(520b34e4-8a51-6974-c44b-a0c67f1913a8)/State/RPC::vpxapi.VpxaService:vpxa::esx098.server.company.com::vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore
–> ThreadState/ThreadId/8572/State/TASK::task-35026::::vim.DiagnosticManager.generateLogBundles::371e3640-395c-c5a7-595b-dc21b56ca1b7(52a30ca3-828e-2d13-9b67-46f2b645b194)
–> ThreadState/ThreadId/8588/State/TASK::session[ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8]529e290c-c0da-e02f-4c3c-73ecaa630531::datastore-2838::vim.host.DatastoreBrowser.searchSubFolders::ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8(520b34e4-8a51-6974-c44b-a0c67f1913a8)/State/RPC::vpxapi.VpxaService:vpxa::esx098.server.company.com::vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore
–> ThreadState/ThreadId/8680/State/WAITING_VPX_MUTEX::QuickStatsResultQueue
–> ThreadState/ThreadId/8688/State/TASK::session[ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8]526bfb1a-e489-050e-8b25-302accd06a9c::datastore-2897::vim.host.DatastoreBrowser.searchSubFolders::ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8(520b34e4-8a51-6974-c44b-a0c67f1913a8)/State/RPC::vpxapi.VpxaService:vpxa::esx130.server.company.com::vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore
–> ThreadState/ThreadId/8720/State/TASK::session[ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8]52289e72-a956-c1a3-24ac-c1e39193918e::datastore-2843::vim.host.DatastoreBrowser.searchSubFolders::ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8(520b34e4-8a51-6974-c44b-a0c67f1913a8)/State/RPC::vpxapi.VpxaService:vpxa::esx130.server.company.com::vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore
–> ThreadState/ThreadId/8760/State/TASK::session[ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8]52aebf6b-afda-4b80-e748-f2584b83c047::datastore-2839::vim.host.DatastoreBrowser.searchSubFolders::ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8(520b34e4-8a51-6974-c44b-a0c67f1913a8)/State/RPC::vpxapi.VpxaService:vpxa::esx130.server.company.com::vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore
–> ThreadState/ThreadId/8828/State/TASK::session[ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8]529e2bdf-686e-bf2e-5f38-abb50a9ffd6b::datastore-2841::vim.host.DatastoreBrowser.searchSubFolders::ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8(520b34e4-8a51-6974-c44b-a0c67f1913a8)/State/RPC::vpxapi.VpxaService:vpxa::esx130.server.company.com::vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore
–> ThreadState/ThreadId/8856/State/TASK::session[ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8]52cb5829-f64f-4a8e-4d22-202682b8e2ab::datastore-2844::vim.host.DatastoreBrowser.searchSubFolders::ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8(520b34e4-8a51-6974-c44b-a0c67f1913a8)/State/RPC::vpxapi.VpxaService:vpxa::esx130.server.company.com::vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore
–> ThreadState/ThreadId/9072/State/TASK::task-internal-2::::VpxdDrmMainLoop::/State/WAITING_VPX_MUTEX::VpxdDrmMainLoopLRO
–> ThreadState/ThreadId/9096/State/TASK::task-internal-1::::VpxdDrmMainLoop::/State/WAITING_VPX_MUTEX::VpxdDrmMainLoopLRO
–> ThreadState/ThreadId/9168/State/TASK::session[ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8]52987018-8a32-89de-8b86-44af61a2ab94::datastore-2842::vim.host.DatastoreBrowser.searchSubFolders::ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8(520b34e4-8a51-6974-c44b-a0c67f1913a8)/State/RPC::vpxapi.VpxaService:vpxa::esx130.server.company.com::vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore
–> ThreadState/ThreadId/9204/State/WAITING_VPX_MUTEX::MapListLRU
–> ThreadState/ThreadId/9420/State/TASK::task-internal-622550::host-552::VpxdInvtHostSyncHostLRO.Synchronize::/State/WAITING_VPX_MUTEX::TaskInfoPublisherLock
–> ThreadState/ThreadId/9432/State/TASK::session[ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8]52a3861b-23b2-4c92-0126-8faac627b359::datastore-2922::vim.host.DatastoreBrowser.searchSubFolders::ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8(520b34e4-8a51-6974-c44b-a0c67f1913a8)/State/RPC::vpxapi.VpxaService:vpxa::esx098.server.company.com::vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore

These searches are originating from ID “ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8″

–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/PropertyCollector/ComputeFilterUpdatesTime/max 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/PropertyCollector/ComputeFilterUpdatesTime/mean 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/PropertyCollector/ComputeFilterUpdatesTime/min 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/PropertyCollector/ComputeFilterUpdatesTime/numSamples 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/PropertyCollector/ComputeFilterUpdatesTime/total 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/PropertyCollector/ComputeGUReqTime/max 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/PropertyCollector/ComputeGUReqTime/mean 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/PropertyCollector/ComputeGUReqTime/min 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/PropertyCollector/ComputeGUReqTime/numSamples 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/PropertyCollector/ComputeGUReqTime/total 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/PropertyCollector/ComputeProvidersTime/max 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/PropertyCollector/ComputeProvidersTime/mean 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/PropertyCollector/ComputeProvidersTime/min 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/PropertyCollector/ComputeProvidersTime/numSamples 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/PropertyCollector/ComputeProvidersTime/total 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/PropertyCollector/SetDoneTime/max 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/PropertyCollector/SetDoneTime/mean 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/PropertyCollector/SetDoneTime/min 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/PropertyCollector/SetDoneTime/numSamples 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/PropertyCollector/SetDoneTime/total 0

–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Session/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/ClientIP=’10.1.1.4′/HttpSessionObject/Hidden/total 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Session/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/ClientIP=’10.1.1.4′/PropertyCollector/FilterCount/total 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Session/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/ClientIP=’10.1.1.4′/PropertyCollector/FullScans/total 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Session/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/ClientIP=’10.1.1.4′/PropertyCollector/IncrementalScans/total 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Session/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/ClientIP=’10.1.1.4′/PropertyCollector/LastVersionNum/total 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Session/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/ClientIP=’10.1.1.4′/PropertyCollector/NullCollectorCount/total 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Session/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/ClientIP=’10.1.1.4′/PropertyCollector/QueuedOpsCount/total 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Session/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/ClientIP=’10.1.1.4′/PropertyCollector/ReadLocked/total 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Session/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/ClientIP=’10.1.1.4′/PropertyCollector/TotalObjectCount/total 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Session/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/ClientIP=’10.1.1.4′/PropertyCollector/TriggeredFiltersCount/total 0
–> /SessionStats/SessionPool/Session/Id=’ca010e84-bd1f-0493-018c-65a5389452c8′/Username=’WDW\f-hpsitescope’/ClientIP=’10.1.1.4′/PropertyCollector/TriggeredProcessGUReqs/total 0

These searches are originating from user ‘f-hpsitescope’ on IP 10.1.1.4 and are effectively hammering vCenter with constant vpxapi.VpxaService.searchDatastore API requests. The next step would be to locate the server with this IP address and determine what piece of software is generating so many requests. Based on the name of the user it suggests that HP SiteScope is causing these requests. This may not necessarily be a problem with that product but instead how that product is configured. A useful troubleshooting step would be to disable this product to see if the behavior stops.

I hope this demonstration shows you an end-to-end approach on how to investigate these kinds of problems on your own.

Okt 292014
 
Tony Scott joined VMware in August 2013 and leads the company&#rsquo;s global information technology group as Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer. Tribal Knowledge was eager to sit down with Tony to ask him a few questions about VMware, his leadership and management experience in IT services, the future of IT and more. Read […]]> http://blogs.vmware.com/tribalknowledge/2014/10/five-questions-cio-part-one.html/feed 0 Coachella Valley Schools, Community Partner to Ensure &#lsquo;No Child Left Offline&#rsquo; http://blogs.vmware.com/tribalknowledge/2014/10/coachella-valley-schools-community-partner-ensure-child-left-offline.html?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=coachella-valley-schools-community-partner-ensure-child-left-offline http://blogs.vmware.com/tribalknowledge/2014/10/coachella-valley-schools-community-partner-ensure-child-left-offline.html#comments Tue, 28 Oct 2014 17:08:03 +0000
Okt 292014
 
By Jay Marshall, Senior Technical Marketing Manager, Cloud Application Development, Hybrid Cloud Services Division, VMware Last week Cloud Foundry published governing documents for the Cloud Foundry open source Foundation. It&#rsquo;s an important moment that gets the industry one step closer to delivering on the promise of PaaS. At VMware, it&#rsquo;s especially near to our hearts […]]> By Jay Marshall, Senior Technical Marketing Manager, Cloud Application Development, Hybrid Cloud Services Division, VMware

Last week Cloud Foundry published governing documents for the Cloud Foundry open source Foundation. It&#rsquo;s an important moment that gets the industry one step closer to delivering on the promise of PaaS. At VMware, it&#rsquo;s especially near to our hearts because it continues an effort that we started several years ago.

The Cloud Foundry open source PaaS project began at VMware and publicly launched in April 2011. We spun out the Cloud Foundry project as part of Pivotal in the spring of 2013, and have continued to work closely with the team as one of the leading sponsors for this open PaaS initiative.

As a result:

  • In November 2013, we released Pivotal CF, software based on open source Cloud Foundry, enabling VMware customers to offer a PaaS based on vSphere.
  • In May we announced the industry&#rsquo;s first enterprise-class hybrid PaaS on VMware vCloud Air
  • And we continue to explore further integration of Pivotal CF with VMware management products, and vCloud Air services to make it easier for customers to rapidly adopt and enjoy the benefits of an enterprise PaaS

Overall progress for the industry-wide effort has benefited from Cloud Foundry&#rsquo;s open source PaaS project – one that provides a choice of clouds, frameworks and application services.

The bylaws published last week were drafted by a committee with deep open source expertise and with a focus on creating a system of governance that maintains a meritocratic, agile development community for open PaaS. Beyond that progress we&#rsquo;ve made to this point with our open initiative efforts, the end goal is to create a foundation that fosters a longstanding community of customers, partnersand competitors who work together, learn together and build upon open cloud and open source to spark continuous innovation and high velocity agile development.

You can read the Cloud Foundry blog to learn more about the bylaws and future path to establishing the Foundation. They bylaws are also available for review in the About section on the Cloud Foundry website.

Okt 292014
 
By Ajay Patel,Vice President, Application as a Service, VMware I am excited to announce that VMware today acquired the assets of Continuent, a leading provider of database clustering and replication, enabling enterprises to run business-critical applications on cost-effective open source software. The Continuent team joins VMware&#rsquo;s Hybrid Cloud Business Unit. Continuent&#rsquo;s products bring the power […]]> By Ajay Patel,Vice President, Application as a Service, VMware

I am excited to announce that VMware today acquired the assets of Continuent, a leading provider of database clustering and replication, enabling enterprises to run business-critical applications on cost-effective open source software. The Continuent team joins VMware&#rsquo;s Hybrid Cloud Business Unit.

Continuent&#rsquo;s products bring the power of advanced clustering and replication, including high availability, disaster recovery, multi-master operation and real-time data warehouse loading, to MySQL. In particular, Continuent Tungsten enables customers to apply the full power of both MySQL and a full range of data management systems including Hadoop, Oracle and Amazon Redshift, to deliver complete transaction processing and analytics.

Continuent&#rsquo;s customers represent the some of the most innovative and successful organizations in the world, handling billions of transactions daily across a wide range of industries. The acquisition is good news for Continuent customers, as we plan to continue offering Continuent Tungsten as an infrastructure agnostic hybrid solution, with the same high quality support that customers currently receive for other VMware products.

Moving forward, we plan to enhance Continuent&#rsquo;s technology, integrating it within VMware vCloud Air our hybrid cloud service. We will also investigate expanding the integration to VMware&#rsquo;s core Software-Defined Data Center products. These new VMware services and product capabilities will enhance our customers&#rsquo; ability to provide high availability, scale, and reliability for their relational databases and dependent applications.

So with that, we welcome the Continuent team to the VMware family and look forward to continuing to deliver the industry&#rsquo;s fastest path to hybrid cloud.

Okt 292014
 
Mobile technology is incredibly pervasive. It has fundamentally changed how we communicate, work, learn and live. And for the first AirWatch #MobileGameChanger stories, released today, mobile has inspired changes that have led to greater equality in education, further-reaching healthcare and better work-life balance. Today, AirWatch recognizes three organizations for their innovation in the use of […]]> http://blogs.air-watch.com/2014/10/introducing-airwatch-mobile-game-changers/feed/ 0 Watch the video: Howard Green interviews Josean Mendez of Capgemini http://blogs.air-watch.com/2014/10/watch-video-howard-green-interviews-josean-mendez-capgemini/ http://blogs.air-watch.com/2014/10/watch-video-howard-green-interviews-josean-mendez-capgemini/#comments Tue, 28 Oct 2014 22:00:44 +0000
Okt 292014
 
Now that you understand your infrastructure costsand have established your IT Service pricesthe next step is to benchmark the cost of your services with those of similarly configured services from publically available cloud services providers like Amazon, Microsoft and VMware. Competitive benchmarking helps you understand how efficient you are compared to other providers. In addition […]]> http://blogs.vmware.com/management/2014/10/cloud-chargeback-part-4-compare-costs-public-cloud-alternatives.html/feed 0 The Power of the vRealize Suite – Private Cloud Success Stories from the Trenches http://blogs.vmware.com/management/2014/10/applications-private-cloud-success-stories-trenches.html?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=applications-private-cloud-success-stories-trenches http://blogs.vmware.com/management/2014/10/applications-private-cloud-success-stories-trenches.html#comments Mon, 27 Oct 2014 10:12:40 +0000