Top 5 Planet V12n blog posts week 39

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure  Kommentare deaktiviert für Top 5 Planet V12n blog posts week 39
Sep 302009
 

Source: VMware Newsletter >>

Top 5 Planet V12n blog posts week 39

First of all my apologies that this post is a day late. My wife and I went to Köln(or Cologne as most of you probably call it) for the weekend. For me that means no laptop, internet and/or twitter. We had a great time, but I won’t tell you all the details just visit it if you are near by. The Cathedral by itself is worth your time! This weeks top 5 is more or less a waste of time. It’s only a top 5 because that’s what the title of this article is. In my opinion „A “Multivendor Post” on using iSCSI with VMware vSphere“ is far above and beyond anything else on the list this week, and probably this year. Although I linked Chad’s version this is a collaborative article between VMware (Andy Banta), EMC (Chad Sakac), NetApp (Vaughn Stewart),
Dell/EqualLogic( Eric Schott) and HP/Lefthand Networks (Adam Carter). Thanks guys for this great piece of work…

  • Chad Sakac – A “Multivendor Post” on using iSCSI with VMware vSphere
    One of the most popular posts we’ve ever done was the original “A ‘Multivendor Post’ to help our mutual iSCSI customers using VMware” that focused on the operation of the software iSCSI initiator in ESX 3.5 with several iSCSI targets from multiple vendors. There’s been a lot of demand for a follow-up, so without further ado, here’s a multivendor collaborative effort on an update, which leverages extensively content from VMworld 2009 sessions TA2467 and TA3264. The post was authored by the following vendors and people: VMware (Andy Banta), EMC (Chad Sakac), NetApp (Vaughn Stewart), Dell/EqualLogic( Eric Schott), HP/Lefthand Networks (Adam Carter)
  • Eric Siebert- Master’s guide to VMware Fault Tolerance
    FT works by creating a secondary VM on another ESX host that shares the
    same virtual disk file as the primary VM, and then transferring the CPU
    and virtual device inputs from the primary VM (record) to the secondary
    VM (replay) via a FT logging network interface card (NIC) so it is in
    sync with the primary VM and ready to take over in case of a failure.
    While both the primary and secondary VMs receive the same inputs, only
    the primary VM produces output such as disk writes and network
    transmits. The secondary VM’s output is suppressed by the hypervisor
    and is not on the network until it becomes a primary VM, so essentially
    both VMs function as a single VM.
  • Duncan Epping – Using limits instead of downscaling…
    I’ve seen this floating around the communities a couple of times and
    someone also mentioned this during a VCDX Panel: setting limits on VMs
    when you are not allowed to decrease the memory. For example you want
    to P2V a server with 8GB of memory and an average utilization of 15%.
    According to normal guidelines it would make sense to resize the VM to
    2GB, however due to political reasons (I paid for 8GB and I demand…)
    this is not an option. This is when people start looking into using
    limits. However I don’t recommend this approach and there’s a good
    reason for it.
  • Vittorio Viarengo – Virtualization Journey Stages
    Confidence can be characterized as selective at this stage.
    The team carefully selects the first applications to virtualize based
    on a path of least resistance for their organization. “Do I have a good
    relationship with that application owner?, “Do I have skills to
    virtualize the application in question?”, “What are the risks
    associated with virtualizing it?”, “What are the risks associated with
    NOT virtualizing it?”, “Does the ISV support the application in a
    virtual environment?”, “Is there a compelling reason to virtualize this
    particular app (lack of HA, deploying a new version, non-satisfactory
    uptime…)?”…
  • Steve Kaplan – The desktops may be virtual, but the ROI is real
    While the white paper lacks supporting data, the numbers nonetheless
    look reasonable. For comparison, I recently calculated annual savings
    of $455 for an organization virtualizing 1,000 PCs and laptops as part
    of a phase one View 3 deployment. The payback period of 11.7 months
    against an investment of $500,000 is in the general vicinity of the IDC
    averages. Applying the IDC white paper estimate of $130 in user
    productivity savings further reduces the payback period to 9.3 months.

      
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 Posted by at 16:53

VMworld 2009 linkage redux

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure  Kommentare deaktiviert für VMworld 2009 linkage redux
Sep 302009
 

Source: VMware Newsletter >>

VMworld 2009 linkage redux

The dust has settled from VMworld 2009, and I hope everybody is saddled back up and on their horses once again at work. I’ve been seeing new ideas and new proposals pop up in from Twitter & blog colleagues across the virtualization industry, so I think we can say the conference was a success.

For posterity, I do want to point everybody and The Great Google to two amazing resources to navigate the VMworld-information-o-sphere from Eric Siebert and Duncan Epping:

Eric Siebert: VMworld 2009 Links at vSphere-Land

Duncan Epping: VMworld 2009 (San Francisco) Linkage

I did a similar type of coverage at VMworld 2006 & VMworld 2007, and I’ve got to tell you, it’s a lot of work to put these kinds of links and resources together. If you find them useful, please let Eric (@ericsiebert on Twitter) and Duncan (@DuncanYB) know. Thanks, guys!

      
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 Posted by at 16:52

Update: Support for guest OS paravirtualization using VMware VMI to be retired from new products in 2010-2011

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Sep 302009
 

Source: VMware Newsletter >>

Update: Support for guest OS paravirtualization using VMware VMI to be retired from new products in 2010-2011

VMware has begun the phased retirement of support for guest OS kernel-based paravirtualization using VMware’s Virtual Machine Interface (VMI) technology. We have decided to retire support for VMI in 2010-2011 as a result of innovations in CPU hardware acceleration technologies from Intel and AMD which have surpassed the performance improvements provided by VMI. As these CPU innovations are expected to become ubiquitous in the next 2-3 years, VMware has begun a phased retirement of the VMI functionality. This announcement is not applicable to device-based paravirtualization technologies provided by VMware which will continue to provide significant customer benefits for years to come.

This change only affects virtual machines running Linux-based operating systems which have VMI enabled. VMware will continue to support VMI on existing supported releases until such time as these releases reach end of life. See http://www.vmware.com/support/policies/index.html for the VMware product support lifecycle policy. Starting in 2010, new VMware products will cease to provide VMI support. VMI will be phased out of Workstation first; beginning in 2010; followed by vSphere in 2011.

Knowledge base article 1013842 „Migrating VMI-enabled virtual machines to platforms that do not support VMI“ has been posted to our support site. This KB article describes how to turn off VMI on effected virtual machines when needed.

      
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 Posted by at 16:52

Comparing Performance of 1vCPU Nehalem VM with 2vCPU Harpertown VM

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure  Kommentare deaktiviert für Comparing Performance of 1vCPU Nehalem VM with 2vCPU Harpertown VM
Sep 302009
 

Source: VMware Newsletter >>

Comparing Performance of 1vCPU Nehalem VM with 2vCPU Harpertown VM

vSphere has a new feature called Fault Tolerance that allows for a VM to be running in vLockstep on two physical servers at the same time.  In the event of a failure of the primary VM, the secondary VM will immediately take over with no downtime for the VM.  There is a great whitepaper that covers FT architecture and performance.  There have also been a couple of blog posts on VROOM! recently that cover FT performance as well.  One uses VMmark to show how FT has excellent performance in a heavily loaded multi workload environment.  The other blog post shows how an Exchange VM maintains excellent performance while supporting 2000 users with FT enabled.

FT currently requires that 1vCPU VMs be used.  This presents a challenge for some applications that have traditionally been run in 2vCPU VM configurations.  At the same time, new processors have features that provide much higher performance than in the past.  When combined with the performance enhancements of ESX 4, it is now possible to get much better performance per core. 

Testing Configuration

A series of Exchange Server 2007 tests were conducted to compare the performance of 1vCPU current processor generation VMs with previous processor generation 2vCPU VMs.  For the 1vCPU tests the Intel Xeon X5570 (Nehalem) processor was used with FT enabled.  (For detailed test results comparing FT enabled and disabled on the same VMs read my previous blog post on Exchange with FT Performance.)   For the 2vCPU tests, two previous generation Intel processors were used: a Xeon x5355 (Clovertown) and Xeon x5460 (Harpertown).  The specific servers used were a Dell M600 and Dell 2950 respectively.  Storage for all the tests was provided by several Dell EqualLogic PS5000XV iSCSI arrays.  Microsoft Exchange Load Generator (LoadGen) was used to run the tests. 

The VM was configured with 10GB of RAM and installed with Windows Server 2008 x64 Enterprise Edition and the Exchange Server 2007 mailbox role.  A VM running on another ESX server served as the domain controller and Exchange Client Access and Hub Transport server roles. 

Results

The graph below shows the results in terms of the average latency for the sendmail action from LoadGen and the sum of the vCPU utilizations of the VM.  For these results the sum was used instead of the average because some VMs had 1vCPU and some had 2vCPUs. 

1vCPUwFTvs2vCPUgraph

There are a couple of interesting things to note about the results. 

The first is that the sendmail average latency results with FT enabled on a 1vCPU Xeon 5570 based VM with 1500 users was within 5ms of the 2vCPU Xeon 5460 VM with 2000 users.  This means that the Nehalem based 1vCPU VM was getting an extra 50% more users per vCPU than the 2vCPU Harpertown based VM.

Average CPU utilization on the 1vCPU VM with 2000 users and FT enabled was only 45% which leaves head room for spikes in usage.  This means that 2000 heavy online LoadGen users ran comfortably in a 1vCPU VM. 

Conclusion

A 1vCPU Xeon X5500 series based Exchange Server VM can support 50% more users per core than a 2vCPU VM based on previous generation processors while maintaining the same level of performance in terms of Sendmail latency.  This is accomplished while the VM’s CPU utilization remains below 50%, allowing plenty of capacity for peaks in workload and making an FT VM practical for use with Exchange Server 2007.

      
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 Posted by at 16:51

VMware’s Desktop Vision

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure  Kommentare deaktiviert für VMware’s Desktop Vision
Sep 302009
 

Source: VMware Newsletter >>

VMware’s Desktop Vision

Scottdavis.small

Posted by Scott Davis
VMware View Chief Technology Officer
cross-posted from Scott’s new blog: VMware View-Point

Welcome to VMware View-Point, our Desktop Office of the CTO Blog.  My name is Scott Davis and  I’ve recently moved over to our Desktop BU as our overall CTO.

So, who is this guy and what does he know about desktop computing and virtualization?

Besides being an expert in operating systems, storage, virtualization and enterprise IT, I’m also an entrepreneur at heart and I am very excited about the opportunity in front of us; using virtualization insights and technologies to create a far better and richer experience around client computing for both end users and the IT staff that administers the infrastructure. The opportunity to change the world is what gets me up in the morning and that’s what I see when I look at the state of client computing and the palette of technologies VMware and our partners are bringing to it.

When I tell folks about my new role, a question I get asked is “What does virtualization really mean for client or desktop systems?” Well, virtualization is powerful for ALL forms of computing, from the desktop to the data center and the cloud. Virtualization is fundamentally about encapsulation and isolation between layers. It’s about explicitly severing all dependencies between an application and the various software and hardware components necessary to perform the specific task – so that every layer is isolated and can be provisioned, managed, updated and secured independently. By layers here I mean my applications, my data, my user settings or profile, the operating system, middleware and the actual physical devices in use. In other words,  enabling these components on either side to have independence from each other and to evolve separately. The power of virtualization comes from this fundamental tenet – separating the work to be done from the dependence on specific hardware and software that does the work. However, it’s really a building block. And customers don’t buy cool building blocks, they buy solutions to real world business problems. And solutions are comprised of applying the right building blocks in the right way to real world problems. By virtualizing and centrally managing these different layers, end users get the flexibility and freedom they desire while desktop IT admins get a cost effective, secure way to manage the desktop infrastructure. And in the server world, it’s had incredible impact; this notion of encapsulating a workload into a file and moving it around live with the ease of copying a file – Consolidation, Business Continuity, Rapid Provisioning, Data Center Automation, Disaster Recovery, and ultimately Flexibility are just a few of these solutions. 

Ok, you’ve said enough for me to read the next paragraph. What’s your vision of the desktop?

Diversity is growing. We have more client device types – thin clients, thick clients, mobile laptops, smartphones. We have more operating systems, look at the excitement generated by the iPhone, Blackberry, and Android operating systems, Mac OS, Linux and even the new Google Chrome OS designed for Web 2.0 applications. An explosion of new applications is occurring as well. Look at the plethora of iPhone/iPod Touch apps – a platform than didn’t exist a few short years ago. And we all use many of these technologies not just for fun, but to get our work done. Enterprise IT, on the other hand, needs to guarantee service levels (which has been historically more difficult for desktop), protect the company’s assets, provide security, and of course manage everything. And provide all the applications that everyone needs to accomplish their jobs. And by the way, do it all cost effectively! How to reconcile these vastly different and conflicting demands? This is a different climate than server
computing…

VMware’s vision for client or desktop computing is to use virtualization technologies to encapsulate and isolate all the aspects of the desktop. Make each aspect independently manageable, duplicate-able, recreate-able.  Employee-Owned IT? Separate into different virtual machines. Lost, broken or obsolete device? Throw it away, the VM is preserved in the data center and can be redeployed at will. 

I want the freedom that comes with complete separation between my physical devices and all my software. I want device independence; my applications, my data, my personality dynamically composited and encapsulated executing on the optimal device(s) for my  current time and location.  That may mean collocating layers on the same device or distributing across multiple systems. I want isolation; my personal and professional applications, run-time and data isolated and encapsulated, accessible via the internet, mobile devices, thin and thick clients. With client virtualization I want the display, the computes and the storage intelligently and automatically placed – sometimes its’ better to execute the workload in the data center and virtualize the graphics to a client. Other times, I want to take the whole workload with me and run it on a laptop. Or something in between. And why stop there? We’re also doing best of breed virtualization for isolation and encapsulation between all relevant boundaries – that’s why we have ThinApp for application virtualization and continue to invest in advancing that technology. And why we announced at VMworld our relationship with RTO to make use of their profile caching and replication technology in our solutions. And why we partner with Teradici to jointly bring solutions to market based on the best in class remote graphics protocol designed explicitly for virtualized desktops.  And there’s a lot more coming!

User-Centric Computing; a powerful vision and architecture…

User-Centric Computing is the term we at VMware have coined to describe this  desktop vision – the intersection of our virtualization technologies, management platform and the demands of client computing. This model is facilitated by composited client virtual machines; the desktop VM is not monolithic but created out of multiple component parts, but the result is itself also an encapsulated object, a VM. Each of these component parts are also isolated and may be independently managed and maintained. Client virtualization is about creating an encapsulated virtual machine that represents a user’s desktop out of a collection of independently virtualized parts – Base OS, Virtualized applications, User data files, User profile and settings, virtualized hardware such as graphics and storage. And these parts are dynamically brought together to form the complete desktop VM image. Each layer is independent and isolated from the others. And preserved. And when we execute such a client VM, we may span-machine/device boundaries during its execution.  


Blog figure 1

VMware is committed to this vision and best of breed technologies at every layer:

  • Platform –  VMware vSphere, the upcoming CVP client hypervisor and the world-class common Virtual Machine Monitor (VMM) that they both share.
  • Composition and Management – View Composer for image management, VMware vCenter Suite for virtualized data center management, desktop View Manager for Virtualized Client management, ThinApp our application virtualization  engine, etc.
  • >TRUE User Experience – The ground breaking Teradici PCoIP graphics protocol designed explicitly for virtualized desktops over LAN and WAN, as well as our investments in diverse mobile devices and providing an offline experience.

Blog figure 2

In future blogs, I ‘ll be delving into each of these technologies in depth and many additional topics. We’re just beginning on this journey together.

And a few final remarks…

I hope you’re as excited as I am and that I’ve given you a taste of our vision and what’s to come. The solutions we bring to market based on virtualization technologies will be revolutionary for the desktop computing experience.  Decoupling and managing desktops independently from physical end point devices. And with the Windows 7 refresh looming, this is the ideal time to make the break to virtualized clients. Rapid provisioning, desktop style. Replacing obsolete or lost devices. Painlessly. Upgrading any individual component part, be it hardware or software, without down time or outage. Reduced Complexity. Desktops have gotten burdened with greater and greater complexity, as anyone trying to figure out why their Windows system runs slower and slower will attest. Hey, I’ve built operating systems software and even I get stuck! Using virtualization to optimize and distribute portions of desktops across the optimal hardware to run them at the right time.  Manage and preserve desktop images in the data center – If my client workload is encapsulated as a file through virtualization, then my data center infrastructure can be used to manage, preserve and secure it. Irrespective of the physical device I might be using at the moment.  Rapid provisioning and business continuity, linchpin attributes of virtualization brought to the desktop world. Except instead of rapidly provisioning a new server instance to handle the load, for the desktop its replacing a lost, broken or tolen device without any loss of data or productivity. Or it’s optimizing my experience based on local resources. The right amount of physical hardware, applied to the virtual desktop when its needed.

As has been proven for servers, virtual desktops are really better than physical ones. And that’s our viewpoint!

Follow Scott on Twitter as @shd_9 and Scott and his team on their new blog, VMware View-Point.

      
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 Posted by at 16:51

QuickStart Series for VMware vSphere 4 is Back

 Allgemein, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, VMware Workstation  Kommentare deaktiviert für QuickStart Series for VMware vSphere 4 is Back
Sep 302009
 

Source: VMware Partner Central >>

The VMware vSphere QuickStart Series is a free 4-part training series designed for new customers, new admins, and evaluators.

Part 1: Install & Configure ESXi:
VMware vSphere deployment architecture; install/configure
ESXi, networking & storage, and VMware Tools; and VM creation.

Part 2: VM Management with VMware vCenter Server:
vCenter Server install/configure & back-end DB
connection; user access control; ESXi/ESX host management with vCenter Server;
and create/manage VMs using templates, snapshots, and thin-provisioned VM disks .

Part 3: Cluster Setup, Availability, Load
Balancing
:
VM cluster (resource pool) set-up;
VMotion & Storage VMotion live migration; High Availability; and DRS load
balancing.

Part 4: Monitoring, Availability, Backup, Next
Steps
:
VM performance monitoring; vCenter alarms
& reports; Fault Tolerance; Data Recovery; and choosing the right VMware
vSphere edition for your organization.

Register now for the live online sessions or watch the webcast replays at your own pace.

Check out the VMware vSphere QuickStart series


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 Posted by at 16:50

Maintain Program Compliance: Get Your VTSP

 Allgemein, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, VMware Workstation  Kommentare deaktiviert für Maintain Program Compliance: Get Your VTSP
Sep 302009
 

Source: VMware Partner Central >>

Did you know that Professional-level partners must have 1 VSP and VTSP on staff by October 31, 2009 in order to maintain program benefits? The VMware Technical Sales Professional (VTSP) is a
no-cost online learning course that provides fundamental technical knowledge for
pre-sales individuals.

If your company does not have 1 VTSP on staff, login to Partner University and register for the free courses. (Certain requirements vary by region.)

Sign up for VTSP courses on Partner University


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 Posted by at 16:50

VSP 4 Localized Content Now Available

 Allgemein, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, VMware Workstation  Kommentare deaktiviert für VSP 4 Localized Content Now Available
Sep 302009
 

Source: VMware Partner Central >>

The courses for the VMware Sales Professional 4 (VSP 4) content has been localized and are now available in Portuguese, Spanish,
Korean, Chinese, German, French, Russian, and Italian. The VSP is a sales training program designed to provide you baseline knowledge that you
can use when selling VMware products. VSP is a prerequisite that you must
complete before you can obtain Sales Competency Accreditations

Click on the "Localized Courses" section on Partner University


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 Posted by at 16:50

Q3 End of Quarter-End Guidelines and Cut-Off Times Announced

 Allgemein, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, VMware Workstation  Kommentare deaktiviert für Q3 End of Quarter-End Guidelines and Cut-Off Times Announced
Sep 302009
 

Source: VMware Partner Central >>

VMware has just announced quarter-end guidelines and cut-off times for Q3 2009, ending on September 30, 2009.

Please
be advised that our distribution partners recently received notification from
VMware regarding quarter-end order processing. We suggest you take note of the
dates and guidelines and submit your orders to Distribution early so they
can meet VMware timelines for guaranteed order processing. Our intent is to
book every order possible, but we can only guarantee booking up to the
dates specified.

Get the critical dates and times for Q3 close


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 Posted by at 16:50

Performance Evaluation of VMXNET3 Virtual Network Device

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure  Kommentare deaktiviert für Performance Evaluation of VMXNET3 Virtual Network Device
Sep 162009
 

Source: VMware Newsletter >>

Performance Evaluation of VMXNET3 Virtual Network Device

vSphere 4.0 introduces a new para-virtualized network device – VMXNET3.  We recently published a paper demonstrating its performance characteristics, compared to that of enhanced VMXNET2 (the previous generation of high performance virtual network device from VMware).

Some highlights of this paper are:

(1) Throughput gains of up to 92% for 10G TCP/IPv4 Rx workloads with large socket buffer, which greatly improves bulk data transfer performance in a data center environment.

(2) Dramatic gains across all configurations of IPv6 traffic, with significant CPU usage reduction and throughput improvement over enhanced VMXNET2.

In a nutshell, VMXNET3 offers performance on par with or better than its predecessors on both Windows and Linux guests. Both the driver and the device have been highly tuned to perform better on modern systems.  Furthermore, VMXNET3 introduces new features and enhancements, such as TSO6 and RSS. TSO6 makes it especially useful for users deploying applications that deal with IPv6 traffic, while RSS is helpful for deployments requiring high scalability.  Moving forward, to keep pace with an ever-increasing demand for network bandwidth, we recommend customers migrate to VMXNET3.

For more details, please read our full paper from here.

      
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 Posted by at 13:26

Top 5 Planet V12n blog posts week 37

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure  Kommentare deaktiviert für Top 5 Planet V12n blog posts week 37
Sep 162009
 

Source: VMware Newsletter >>

Top 5 Planet V12n blog posts week 37

The week after VMworld is probably even more chaotic than VMworld itself. Not only are you digesting all the new ideas/concepts/thoughts you brought home from VMworld you will also need to pick up all the presents(work) they left waiting for you. On PlanetV12n it was also a busy week. Some cool, really cool, write-ups of VMworld and some great non-VMworld related articles. Although it’s a top 5 The first two have two entries each. Mainly because my post and Massimo’s post are related. Here we go:

  • Massimo Re Ferre‘ – VMware, SpringSource and What’s Not Appropriate to SayThe (Potential) Value of Blogging for Your Career
    When I heard about VMware and SpringSource, all of a sudden I realized
    the world is changing for all of us virtualization geeks. First and
    foremost those that have only been bothering about low level
    infrastructure virtualization details – such as VMotion
    compatibilities, cluster configurations, storage integrations and so
    forth – will have a hard time keeping up with what’s going on in the
    industry. Virtualization vendors are „moving up the stack“ very quickly
    so you’d better start familiarizing with concepts and technologies
    around Development Frameworks, Integrated Development Environment (IDE)
    and stuff like that. Not the sort of things Systems Engineers (aka
    infrastructure people) paid too much attention to – until now.
  • Duncan Epping – Another year has passed by & VMworld 2009 Linkage
    I can’t remember I ever had so many people congratulating me with my
    birthday. (Okay it was on twitter but still…) Usually with my birthday
    coming up I take some time to look back at the past year.
    Coincidentally a couple of weeks ago John Troyer asked me to do a
    presentation at VMworld about blogging and where it can lead to.
    Because of my overbooked agenda (VMworld preperations, VCDX Panels and
    two projects) I did not have any time to prepare it but it is something
    that kept me busy the last week. Especially after seeing Jason Boche’s
    presentation at the vExpert Session at VMworld I started thinking about
    it again. I had some time on my hands, as I took the day off on my
    birthday, and decided to look back and try to convince you why voicing
    your opinion/views and sharing knowledge is important for your personal
    development and career.
  • Joshua Townsend – ESXTOP Batch Mode & Windows Perfmon
    I needed to grab some stats from my ESX hosts for off-line analysis so I fired up my trusty ESXTOP intent on using batch mode to capture a .csv formatted output. I started to manually select the counters I was interested in while working in ESXTOP interactive mode (you can save your selected counters to the esxtop configuration file with the ‘w’ command) and thought that there must be a better way. I found that better way in the VMware Performance Community: http://communities.vmware.com/docs/DOC-3930. There is now a -a switch that can be used to include ALL performance counters. I’m sold.
  • Alan Renouf – vTip – A VMware Expert updating your VI
    Jason Boche has recently announced his vCalendar which is a great daily calendar with tip for each day, there is also a blog widget and netvibes or Google widget for this too, so my script takes these wonderful daily tips and adds them to a place we all visit on a daily basis…. The Virtual Infrastructure Client.
  • Gabrie van Zanten – I had a dream…
    VMware is still the most innovative company in the field of
    virtualization and is still that step ahead of its competitors.
    Therefore VMware remains the number one choice for the most demanding
    workloads. Demanding not necessarily in performance, but mainly in
    security, availability and flexibility.

      
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 Posted by at 13:26

Understanding Memory Resource Management in VMware ESX Server

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure  Kommentare deaktiviert für Understanding Memory Resource Management in VMware ESX Server
Sep 162009
 

Source: VMware Newsletter >>

Understanding Memory Resource Management in VMware ESX Server

Recently, we have published a whitepaper about how ESX server manages the host memory resource. This paper not only presents the basic memory resource management concepts but also shows experiment results explaining the performance impact of three different memory reclamation techniques:

Page sharing, ballooning, and host swapping used in ESX sever. The experiment results show that:

1) Page sharing introduces negligible performance overhead;
2) Compared to host swapping, ballooning will cause much smaller performance degradation when reclaiming memory. In some cases, ballooning even brings zero performance overhead.

The following is the brief summary of the paper.

In general, ESX server uses high-level resource management policies to compute a target memory allocation for every virtual machine based on the current system load and parameter settings for the virtual machine (shares, reservation, and limit, etc). The computed target allocation is used to guide the dynamic adjustment of the memory allocation for each virtual machine. In the cases where host memory is overcommitted, the target allocations are still achieved by invoking several lower-level memory reclamation techniques to reclaim memory from virtual machines.

In this paper, we start from introducing the basic memory virtualization concepts. Then, we discuss the reason why supporting memory overcommitment is necessary in ESX server. Three memory reclamation techniques are currently used in ESX server: Transparent Page Sharing (TPS), Ballooning and Host Swapping. We illustrate the mechanism of these three techniques and analysis the Pros and Cons of each technique from performance perspective. In addition, we present how ESX memory scheduler uses a share-based allocation algorithm to allocate memory for multiple Virtual machines when host memory is overcommitted.

Beyond the technique discussion, we conduct experiments to help user understand how individual memory reclamation techniques impact the performance of various applications. In these experiments, we choose to use SPECjbb, Kernel Compile, Swingbench and Exchange benchmarks to evaluate different techniques.

Finally, based on the memory management concepts and performance evaluation results, we present some best practices for host and guest memory usage.
 
For more details, please read the full paper from here.

      
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 Posted by at 13:25

Top 5 Planet V12n blog posts week 36

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure  Kommentare deaktiviert für Top 5 Planet V12n blog posts week 36
Sep 162009
 

Source: VMware Newsletter >>

Top 5 Planet V12n blog posts week 36

What a week and where do I even begin. For those who have been living under a rock just one word: VMworld. I have met so many people who I have been talking to for a while, and also a lot of people who just came up to me and complimented me on yellow-bricks.com or just wanted to introduce themselves. Thanks everyone for making this an excellent week. Making a top 5 is almost impossible though. The amount of blogs(250+) added over the last 7 days is so insane that I almost had to randomly pick 5. But of course I did not pick them randomly. Here they are, surprisingly most of them have to do with VMworld:

  • Rich Brambley – VMworld 2009 Virtual Infrastructure Design – Lab Manager vPODS Enable Conference Cloud
    If you are like me you probably would have loved to get the opportunity to use the vSphere client to connect to a vCenter server managing that entire virtual infrastructure (VI). Although I did not get to do just that, I did get the opportunity to do the next best thing – talk to the manager of the team that does. My VMworld ended by talking to Randy Keener, Group Manager of VMware’s GETO team (Global Engineering Technical Operations). Keener explained to me some of the VMworld 2009 virtual infrastructure design details that VI administrators would be interested to know.
  • Rick Scherer – My VMware VCDX Defense Experience
    While most of my readers were already home with their families, or packing up and checking out of their hotel rooms on the way to the airport, I was getting ready for probably the most important 2 hours of my technical career.

    So here we are, Friday at 7:15am – a few minutes to grab some food and collect my nerves before I enter room Foothill D at the SF Marriott. To my luck, I enter the lobby of the Mission Steak restaurant and guess who’s there….the entire VMware Certification team, including panel members for my VCDX. There goes collecting my nerves.

  • Justin Emmerson – VMworld session DV2363 – CVP Tech Deep Dive
    In Direct Assignment, technologies like Intel VT-D or other software
    techniques are used to pass through a physical device (such as a video
    card) directly into the VM. This has some advantages such as lower
    overhead, and if you’re running Windows in your VM then all you need is
    a set of Windows drivers, which are easy to find. Passthrough is also
    much easier to program…
  • Joep Piscaer – VMworld ‘09 – Long Distance VMotion (TA3105)
    The main challenge to get VMotion working between datacenters isn’t
    with the VMotion technology itself, but with the adaptations to shared
    storage and networking. Because a virtual machine being VMotioned
    cannot have it’s IP address changed, some challenges exist with the
    network spanning across datacenters. You’ll need stretched VLAN’s, a
    flat network with same subnet and broadcast domain at both locations.
  • Scott Lowe – VMware vCloud Event with Paul Maritz
    Moving away from choice to application compatibility, Paul Maritz again
    refers to the formal announcement of the vCloud API. The vCloud API is
    actually a series of APIs that are being/have been submitted to
    standards organizations (as I mentioned in the keynote coverage, I
    believe it was submitted to the DMTF). SpringSource takes the stage to
    talk about what they do and then perform a demo (a live demo?) of their
    products and technologies. The demo shows off SpringSource and
    CloudFoundry deploying applications to an external cloud.

      
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 Posted by at 13:24

VMware Studio 2.0 Now Available

 Allgemein, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, VMware Workstation  Kommentare deaktiviert für VMware Studio 2.0 Now Available
Sep 162009
 

Source: VMware Partner Central >>

The newly-released VMware Studio 2.0 helps configure, build, deploy, and customize vApps in addition to virtual appliances. Studio 2.0-created software stacks can be managed from the VMware Studio web console or from VMware vCenter Server 4.

ISV partners can use this tool to author and build virtual appliances optimized for VMware vSphere 4 and VMware Infrastructure.

Get the free virtual appliance authoring tool


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 Posted by at 13:22

Now is the Time: Top 10 Reasons Why SMBs Can’t Afford to Sit on the Sidelines Waiting to Virtualize

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure  Kommentare deaktiviert für Now is the Time: Top 10 Reasons Why SMBs Can’t Afford to Sit on the Sidelines Waiting to Virtualize
Sep 072009
 

Source: VMware Newsletter >>

Now is the Time: Top 10 Reasons Why SMBs Can’t Afford to Sit on the Sidelines Waiting to Virtualize

By Joe Andrews, Group Manager, Product Marketing at VMware

In today’s economic environment, it’s no wonder why virtualization technology remains at the top of many IT priority project lists.  Companies that have deployed virtualization solutions have reported cost savings of more than 50% of their infrastructure costs; 60-80% utilization for their x86 servers (up from 5-15% in non-virtualized environments); 85% improvement in recovery time in unplanned downtime; the ability to provision new applications in minutes instead of days or weeks.

So why are so many small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs) still sitting on the sidelines when it comes to virtualization? It could be a number of reasons.  Virtualization may seem primarily suited to large datacenters.  It may be perceived as too expensive or hard to manage.  Whatever the reason, SMBs may be surprised to learn about the other benefits of virtualization that may not be so well known.  Here are just a few:

1)    You get time back in your day. What if you had more time to spend on supporting the business and less time doing mundane, repetitive tasks?  Virtualization can help IT staff spend less time provisioning servers or applying patches so that more time can be spent enabling new business initiatives.

2)    You can get disaster recovery without breaking the bank.  By consolidating servers, IT staff can use the extra capacity to build a replication site without spending thousands of dollars in extra hardware. 

3)    Applications run better. The conventional x86 computing model, with applications tied to physical servers is too rigid and fragmented to efficiently support today’s complex and dynamic applications.  As a result, companies are forced to spend 70% of their IT budgets to manage existing applications and less than 30% is allocated to truly innovating for the business.  This ratio is even more stifling for SMBs that have an IT staff or 1 or 2 people.  Virtualization unlocks these applications’ ties to physical hardware to allow for improved uptime and SLAs, better flexibility and improved performance.

4)    You can get better management. Spending time managing infrastructure gets even more cumbersome as it grows in size and complexity.  Virtualization gives SMBs the ability to manage their infrastructure in a centralized way.  Why is this good?  Centralized IT management lets you view and operate your environment from a single pane of glass and automate resource intensive operations across disparate hardware, operating system and software application environments while reducing the chances of human error.

5)    You can get more out of your hardware. Everybody in the pool!  Because virtualization breaks the legacy “one application to one server” model, infrastructure resources can be pooled to get significantly higher resource utilization. SMBs get improved agility to accommodate increased business demands on IT without having to buy more hardware. SMBs can use hardware that’s been freed up through consolidation for activities that normally could not be accommodated due to lack of budget.

6)    You can get more life out of your applications. Separating the application and OS from the hardware and encapsulating into a virtual machine container enables you to run legacy applications longer on newer hardware and get extended life out of your previous IT investments. 

7)    You can secure your data better. Virtualization separates the OS and applications from the server hardware, shrinking the foot print and vulnerable attack area to lessen the threat from viruses and other security breaches. 

8)    You can get improved business continuity. Virtualization can help SMBs eliminate planned downtime and give them the ability recover quickly from unplanned outages, and have the ability to securely backup and migrate entire virtual environments with no service interruption.

9)    You can save the Earth’s energy. Virtualization means fewer servers and fewer servers mean lower power and cooling costs and space requirements.  Energy savings are estimated at $500 to $600 per server per year.

10)    And yes, you can cut costs! Of course, you can cut capital costs through server consolidation, but more importantly you can cut the operational costs that come with just maintaining your business.  Virtualization allows SMBs to get the power to energize their business while saving money—the time is now to get off the sidelines.

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 Posted by at 13:00