VMware vSphere Blog: Skating your way to the SDDC

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Mai 312013
 

This week I was reminded of that great Wayne Gretzky quote,

“I skate to where the puck is going to be, not where it has been”.

How is that relative to the Software Defined Data Center (SDDC)? Well, because things are moving so fast! That virtualization infrastructure you have today (thank you for my paycheck!) is introducing new challenges in IT and Security management. What was once a few servers, some network and storage and a firewall is growing into hundreds, if not thousands of VM’s, hybrid clouds, tiered storage and stretched networks. There are new tools to learn and new innovative capabilities to leverage.

But it’s getting very complex!

Yes. It is. Every new technology seems complex at first. Every new technology brings benefits and challenges. (Remember the pre-PC era? I do!) But, here’s the good, no, AWESOME part, it’s becoming increasingly easier to automate, validate and assess.  However, if you are still managing and securing this new infrastructure using your old methods, you may find yourself skating to where the puck was and not where it’s going.

Here’s a slide that I’ve been using in my current deck for a while now.

image

Eliyahu Goldratt, who I recently discovered after I built the slide, was a business management guru. In one of his books, he had two guys talking about some new technology that was being installed. In it, one of the characters says

“…technology is a necessary condition, but it’s not sufficient. To get the benefits we must, at the time that we install the new technology, also change the rules that recognize the existence of the limitation. Common sense.”

If you are applying your existing rules, which WILL impose limitations, how can you be assured of getting the benefits of this new technology? The software defined datacenter is changing the rules. Virtualization already has. Have you re-examined your rules? Are you doing security any differently? Don’t worry, you’re not alone, many haven’t. :)

Existing rules. a.k.a. How NOT to do it

Let’s take, as an example, changing a setting on all your VM’s. Let’s say you want to disable the ability to have vCenter auto-install VMware Tools (for whatever reason). Now, according to some security folks, that would mean doing the following steps:

  1. Un-register the VM from vCenter
  2. Connect via the Datastore Browser
  3. Download the .VMX file
  4. Edit the file and make the change
  5. Upload the .VMX file
  6. Re-register the VM to vCenter

That’s not what I would define as a software defined anything. :) That is a process that is fraught with potential errors and security issues. Plus, from a compliance and general security standpoint, how do you assess if it was done or done right? Really, it’s crazy and makes my brain hurt. If the rules have the potential to make you less secure, the rules are broken!

Unfortunately, something like this is called out in a government standard (surprise!) as the required way to do a similar task. Obviously, they have not yet recognized the existence of the limitations.

New rules can benefit everyone

Is there a better way? Yes, you can leverage an IT tool to do this. vCenter has a VERY rich API. In the example above, those steps can be done in a couple of lines of PowerShell thanks to my teammate Alan Renouf and the vSphere Hardening Guide! Note that you can do similar scripting with other scripting languages as well.

Note: These use new cmdlets became available in PowerCLI 5.1 Release 1. PowerCLI 5.1 is now up to Release 2 at the moment.

# Add the setting to all VMs
Get-VM | New-AdvancedSetting -Name “isolation.tools.copy.disable” -value $true

Want to assess what the setting is across all VM’s?

# List the VMs and their current settings
Get-VM | Get-AdvancedSetting -Name  “isolation.tools.autoInstall.disable”| Select Entity, Name, Value

No editing. No de-register/re-registering of VM’s. No leaving copies of VMX files on a desktop. Easy to control, assess and audit. Plus, it’s all done in seconds against all virtual machines rather than days of cumbersome clicking. Want a report on what VM’s are set? Outputting the results to a .CSV file is as simple as adding

| out-csv filename.csv”.

This kind of information becomes valuable to the security guy! Not only that, it can be easily baked into how you do business and even better, put under version control for further alignment with compliance objectives. This is the software part of SDDC. The ability to lessen the time it takes to get things done and do it more efficiently and in an easily measured and assessed fashion.

Find a way to change the rules together

When I meet with customers, I’ll ask if the IT and Security teams  have the resources (e.g. developers) that can assist them with automating the datacenter. Unfortunately, many don’t. It’s not on their radar because they are so wrapped up in fighting fires that process improvement and redefining the rules fall by the wayside.

I would urge both IT and Security to find a way out of that loop. Skate to where the puck is going.

Leveraging the infrastructure capabilities is KEY to a software defined datacenter. This means it’s time to consider having a person or persons on your IT team dedicated to writing code will allow you to enjoy the benefits of the technology. Become knowledgeable about the growing DevOPS movement. I’m exploring it through the lens of security and I’m really, really excited! I’ll share what I find with you in the coming year.

Remember, working with your security team and introducing them to a more efficient way of helping them get their job done not only helps them, it helps IT and gets you both in a better place to get the most out of the technology you purchased.

The payoff of better IT Operations and in turn, MUCH better security, will be well worth it. Position yourself to benefit from technology. Change the rules and start skating!

mike

VMware Cloud Ops Blog: The Illusion of Unlimited Capacity

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Mai 312013
 

By: Andy Troup 

I was at a customer workshop last week, and I used a phrase that I’ve used a few times to describe one of the crucial capabilities of a successful cloud computing service, namely “The Illusion of Unlimited Capacity.” It got a bit of a reaction, and people seemed to understand the concept quite easily. So apart from its sounding quite cool (maybe I should get out more), why do I keep on using this term?

Well, in cloud computing, we all know that there is no such thing as unlimited capacity – everything is finite. Every cloud provider only has a limited number of servers, a limited amount of storage capacity, and a limited number of virtual and physical network ports – you get the idea, it’s all limited, right?

Paradoxically, though, providers of cloud resources have to make sure their customers believe the opposite: that there is no end to what can be consumed.

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) defines one of the characteristics of cloud computing as on-demand self-service; i.e. the user can consume what they want, when they want it. Now, for cloud providers to provide on-demand self-service, they need to be confident that they can fulfill all the requests coming from all their consumers, immediately. They need to maintain, in other words, an illusion of unlimited capacity.

If at any point a consumer makes a request, and the cloud portal they use responds with a “NO” because it’s run out of cloud resources, this illusion has gone. That has real consequences. As it is very easy for consumers to move between cloud providers, it’s very likely that the provider will have lost them as customers and will find it very hard to get them back. Remember, even for internal IT cloud providers, it’s a competitive market place and the customer is king.

So, when defining your cloud strategy, you want to make sure that maintaining ‘the illusion of unlimited capacity’ is on your list. It may not be something you need to consider initially, but when demand for your services increases, you need to be ready to deal with the challenge. To prepare for it, here are 5 things you should start thinking about:

  • Understand your customers – build a strong relationship with your customers, understand their business plans, and use this information to understand the impact those plans will have on the demand for your cloud services.
  • Implement the appropriate tooling – so you can not only understand demand for your cloud capacity today, but also forecast future demand.
  • Consider the Hybrid Cloud – think about how you would burst services in and out of a hybrid cloud and when you would need to do it. Before you actually need to do this, make sure you plan, prepare and automate (where possible), so that everything is in place when it’s needed. Don’t wait until it’s too late.
  • Train users on service consumption etiquette – if they know they can get what they need when they need it, they will be less inclined to hoard resources. And if they aren’t hoarding resources, the pressure to predict their future demand (which can be difficult) will be reduced, because resources are being used more efficiently. Why not agree that they won’t have to plan capacity if they “turn it off” when done, thus freeing resources back to the pool and further increasing spare capacity.
  • Kill zombie workloads – be aware of services that aren’t being used and turn them off (after having a conversation with the customer). Also, encourage the use of leases for temporary services when appropriate.

Finally, going back to the essential characteristics of cloud computing as defined by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) (here is the very short document for those of you that haven’t read it), one other characteristic is rapid elasticity.

If you think about it, this article is really all about rapid elasticity. It’s just another way of saying that you need to maintain the illusion of unlimited capacity. Now, put on your top hat, hold on to your magic wand, and keep the illusion going.

For future updates, follow @VMwareCloudOps on Twitter and join the conversation using the #CloudOps and #SDDC hashtags.

VMware vCloud Blog: Solution to a “Mostly Cloudy” Problem

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Mai 312013
 

This is a guest post from vCloud Service Provider, Logicalis.

By: Steve Pelletier

Have you ever had an IT project that you thought would be ideal to put into a public cloud except for one or two requirements that cloud providers just can’t seem to meet?  I like to refer to these as “mostly cloudy” projects.  As Logicalis has developed its public cloud infrastructure, we’ve had many customers approach us with just this type of project.  An increasingly large proportion of those clients are ISVs who want to focus on their software development and move the hosting of their platform to the cloud.  But there’s an important problem preventing them from doing just that: public clouds typically don’t offer any custom options.

Most public cloud providers believe that standardization is the only way to provide cost benefits on a large scale.  Standardized hardware, automation, management levels – all of these standard tools and functions and more are typically put in place to make a public cloud environment both very efficient and highly repeatable.  Typical public clouds can’t be all things to all people, but they strive to be most things to many.  The problem is, this leaves those “mostly cloudy” projects with no place to turn in the public cloud.

At Logicalis, however, we take a much more consultative approach to everything we do, including our public cloud infrastructure.  We’re working to accommodate these kinds of mostly cloudy projects by deploying dedicated cloud environments.  By applying the same managed services practices that are used in remote management scenarios, Logicalis can provide the appropriate dedicated hardware and management levels as well as the custom requirements many clients need – things which would otherwise have prevented the solution from being hosted in a public cloud.  Logicalis can incorporate custom hardware requirements, higher SLAs, and enhanced security requirements, as well as other customized functions such as allowing a client access to the underlying virtualization and physical layers.  At Logicalis, we’re using our experience running a VMware-based public cloud – the Logicalis Enterprise Cloud – as well as our considerable expertise as a managed service provider to accommodate many of the unique requirements that traditional public clouds simply can’t deliver.

This makes Logicalis’ public cloud and dedicated cloud solutions, built on a VMware platform, ideal for ISVs that are looking to move their applications into the cloud.  Logicalis can provide a robust environment that takes advantage of all of VMware’s functionality to meet the unique requirements of providing a SaaS-based solution.  This allows ISVs to focus on the development and support of their applications without having to worry about the underlying infrastructure.

If the forecast for your project is “mostly cloudy,” a dedicated public cloud solution may be the answer.

Steve Pelletier is a solution architect for Logicalis US, an international IT solutions and managed services provider (www.us.logicalis.com).

VMware End User Computing: No neckties in the paper shredder: Horizon Mirage Branch Reflectors

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Mai 312013
 

By Tina de Benedictis, Senior Technical Marketing Manager, End-User Computing, VMware

No neckties in the paper shredder—what does that have to do with VMware Horizon Mirage Branch Reflectors? By the end of this blog post, you will know.

no-necktie-horizon-mirage-branch-reflectors

You have probably noticed those words or an icon on the paper shredder that indicate you should not put neckties in the paper shredder. Who would put a necktie in the paper shredder? It might be someone who was not paying enough attention and let their necktie dangle into the shredder, or it might be someone who hated that particular necktie and thought the paper shredder was the right place to demolish it.

This is where we find the similarity to Horizon Mirage Branch Reflectors. Branch Reflectors are for efficient handling of layer updates coming down from the datacenter to endpoints, not for backups of endpoints going back up to the datacenter. Who would think that Branch Reflectors are for backups? A lot of people do, and they are surprised to find out that they need to think about their WAN instead of the LAN when planning backups of branch-office endpoints.

horizon-mirage-download-layers-upload-user-changes

Figure 1: Layer Updates and Backups of Endpoints in a Horizon Mirage Deployment

To understand the purpose of Branch Reflectors, you need to understand the flow of layer updates and backups in a Horizon Mirage implementation. In this diagram, you see that IT sends down layer updates to endpoints over the WAN. These IT-managed layers are the base layer (with the operating system) and any application layers.

When Horizon Mirage performs backups of endpoints, endpoint images are sent up to the datacenter over the WAN. An endpoint image includes the updated layers sent down from the datacenter, as well as user changes to the endpoint.

The purpose of a Branch Reflector is to reduce bandwidth usage over the WAN by performing layer updates to endpoints within the remote-office LAN.

horizon-mirage-branch-office-deployment

Figure 2: Layer Updates with a Horizon Mirage Branch Reflector

You can designate one or more existing Mirage-managed endpoints in a remote office as Branch Reflectors. No special setup, installation, or infrastructure is required. With a few clicks in the UI, you have created a Branch Reflector from an endpoint.

Only the Branch Reflector communicates with the Mirage Server. The Branch Reflector downloads the differences between the IT-managed layers in the datacenter and the layers on the branch-office endpoints. Then the Branch Reflector compiles the bits locally to build a new set of IT-managed layers, and distributes these layers to peer PCs over the local LAN.

The Branch Reflector thus serves as an update service for peer PCs in the branch office. Instead of connecting over the WAN to the distant Mirage Server in the datacenter, remote endpoints can connect to the local Branch Reflector over the LAN to receive layer updates.

So, back to no neckties in the paper shredder. Every tool has its purpose. Horizon Mirage Branch Reflectors are for efficient delivery of layer updates to remote-office endpoints, not for endpoint backups. And remember to keep your necktie out of the paper shredder.

For more information about Horizon Mirage layers and Branch Reflectors, see the VMware Horizon Mirage 4.0 Reviewer’s Guide.

VMware Education & Certification Blog: Save 50% on BETA Course: VMware vCloud Automation: Install, Configure, Manage [V5.2] – BETA

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Mai 312013
 

VMware offers BETA courses to those wanting to participate in finalizing the near complete course. You save 50% off the course price.  Register today as BETA courses fill up quickly.

VMware Horizon Mirage: Install, Configure, Manage [V4.0]-BETA
Location: classroom delivery in San Jose, CA, USA
Time:  July 8-11 @ 9:00 PDT

See course description and register today! Or see what other VMware BETA Courses are available.

VMware Accelerate: A New Key Financial Metric for IT’s Cloud Journey

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Mai 312013
 

Author: Mark Sarago

Working with numerous customers on their journey to the cloud has exposed the Accelerate team to a number of metrics that are used to determine an organization’s health and overall value to the business. Let’s focus on a new financial metric that is gaining popularity: private cloud versus public cloud cost per workload.

In their seminal paper, The Balanced Scorecard—Measures that Drive Performance, published in the Harvard Business Review, Robert Kaplan and  David Norton introduced the balanced scorecard as a performance measurement framework. It built on traditional financial measures by adding important non-financial performance indicators to the mix. As a result, it gives executives and managers a more balanced view of organizational performance.

The balanced scorecard has proven to be an effective method of communicating an organization’s overall strategy by establishing a balanced set of tangible goals and the framework of measuring progress toward those goals. The balanced scorecard suggests that we view the organization from four separate perspectives, and to develop metrics, collect data, and analyze the data relative to each of the perspectives, which are:

  1. Financial Perspective – To succeed financially, how should we appear to our shareholders?
  2. Internal Business Perspective (Process) – To maximize our business value, at which processes must we excel?
  3. Customer Perspective – To achieve our vision, how must we appear to our customers?
  4. Innovation and Learning Perspective – To achieve our vision, how will we sustain our ability to change and improve?

CIOs quickly saw the legitimacy of the balanced scorecard and have successfully used it when communicating strategy to their team members, and the value of their information technology activities in relation to their organization’s business executives and customers.

Each of the four perspectives is important, but the one that gets the most attention from business executives — and seems to cause the most concern and confusion for CIOs — is the Financial Perspective performance measurement. It can also be said that the Financial Perspective performance measures are the most important for business executives because the primary language of business is conducted in financial terms – How much will it cost? How much will this save over time? What is the financial break-even period? What is the ROI? — and so forth.

CIOs have responded to the Financial Perspective performance measures of their balanced scorecards by tracking financial metrics such as:

  • Actual to Budget: How does actual OpEx spend compare to the original OpEx budget?
  • Forecast Accuracy: Is the accuracy of the OpEx spend forecasts over the past 12 months within plus/minus two percent?
  • Cost-Per-Business-Unit Trend: Is the IT total cost of ownership (TCO) per unit of business output (e.g., airline seat mile flown, mortgage transaction count, automobiles manufactured) increasing or decreasing over time?

With the advent and popularity of cloud concepts and technologies for IT organizations, we now ask:  What would a CIO want to see as a financial metric in the balanced scorecard to represent their organization’s journey to the cloud?

A few organizations I have met with recently, and which have mature metrics tracking and reporting in place, have already answered the question. They measure their IT TCO per workload in their private cloud against the price of hosting the same workload on a public cloud service such as Microsoft’s Azure or Amazon Web Service’s EC2. When doing so, they also add data transfer into the cost, that is, the cost of communicating the data in and out of the service to computational workload costs incurred.

The metric that compares private cloud workload cost versus all-in public cloud workload pricing is extremely valuable to the CIO. If your private cloud workload cost is lower than public cloud workload pricing, you are showing immediate business value through your IT operation. Conversely, if your private cloud costs are too high, business management is certainly justified to ask: Why should we use your service if we can get it cheaper from a public cloud provider?

Some organizations are so confident in calculating the cost of their private cloud costs per workload and the efficiency of their operation that they have started to build in an added twist. These efficient operations are using the difference or spread in costs between private and public solutions as IT operational “profit.” In turn, the “profit” is used to acquire new equipment and software as they refresh their private cloud going forward. These organizations are truly running IT like a business.

If you aren’t familiar with the balanced scorecard for IT, please give it a deeper look. While doing so, also consider including a new metric to the Financial Perspective performance measures, and include the private cloud versus public cloud cost per workload.

——–

Mark Sarago is a strategist with VMware Accelerate Advisory Services.

VMware AccelerateTM Advisory Services can help you define your IT strategy through balanced transformation plans across people, process and technology. Visit our Web site to learn more about our offerings, or reach out to us today at accelerate@vmware.com for more information.

Would you like to continue this conversation with your C-level executive peers? Join our exclusive CxO Corner Facebook page for access to hundreds of verified CxOs sharing ideas around IT Transformation right now by going to CxO Corner and clicking “ask to join group.”

VMware for Small-Medium Business Blog: The New Test Drive program from NetApp and VMware lets SMBs experience firsthand how virtualization can benefit their storage networks.

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Mai 302013
 

NetApp and VMware are very aware of what SMBs are struggling with when it comes to backup and have developed a joint hardware/software solution that should alleviate their concerns. SMBs that purchase an affordable storage solution from NetApp and upgrade to VMware with vSphere with Operations Management Enterprise (VSOM Ent) will be able to quickly and easily add backup and disaster recover capabilities to their existing vSphere environment. This gives SMBs the ability to implement these more advanced storage capabilities using the VMware vCenter console they have grown used to working with.

You can also take a look back at the other posts, “What’s the True Cost of Virtual Network Storage to the SMB?” and “Virtualization and Mid-Size Businesses: What’s the Hold Up?

If you’re interested in seeing just how easy it is to protect your valuable applications and add backup and disaster recovery to your virtualized network, you can download a free 90-day trial of NetApp virtual appliance and VMware software here.

Follow VMware SMB on Facebook, Twitter, Spiceworks and Google+ for more blog posts, conversation with your peers, and additional insights on IT issues facing small to midmarket businesses.

VMware Education & Certification Blog: Save 10% on June’s Live Online Training Schedule in EMEA

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Mai 302013
 

VMware is offering 10% discount on all direct delivered Live Online classes scheduled in EMEA through 30 June! Check out the list of available courses below and register today.

Remember to use referral code: EMEALOL10 when registering, to get your discount!

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VMware vCenter Configuration Manager for Virtual Infrastructure Management [V5.5]

10/06/2013

3

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Register

VMware vSphere: What’s New [V5.1]

10/06/2013

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VMware vSphere: Install, Configure, Manage [V5.1]

17/06/2013

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VMware vCloud Director: Install, Configure, Manage [v5.1]

17/06/2013

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VMware vCenter Operations Manager: Analyze and Predict [V5.x]

20/06/2013

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VMwareTV: SAP HANA on VMware vCloud Suite

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für VMwareTV: SAP HANA on VMware vCloud Suite
Mai 302013
 
See how virtualizing SAP HANA on VMware vCloud Suite increases IT agility, simplifies management and lowers total cost of ownership. Learn more: http://vmwar...
From: vmwaretv
Views: 621
5 ratings
Time: 14:08 More in Science & Technology

VMwareTV: Scott Lundstrom (IDC) on Healthcare Performance and Infrastructure

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für VMwareTV: Scott Lundstrom (IDC) on Healthcare Performance and Infrastructure
Mai 302013
 
Hear from Scott Lundstrom, Group VP, IDC Health IT Insights at HIMSS 2013 reflected on how providers, for the last few years, have been focused on electronic...
From: vmwaretv
Views: 58
0 ratings
Time: 02:36 More in Science & Technology

VMware Technical Communications Video Blog: Integrating Horizon View and Horizon Workspace, Part 1

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für VMware Technical Communications Video Blog: Integrating Horizon View and Horizon Workspace, Part 1
Mai 292013
 

This video shows how to set up Horizon View and Horizon Workspace to provide users with a single, integrated point of access to their virtual desktops.


VMware Technical Communications Video Blog: Configuring Horizon Workspace to integrate with Horizon View, Part 2

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für VMware Technical Communications Video Blog: Configuring Horizon Workspace to integrate with Horizon View, Part 2
Mai 292013
 

This video shows how to configure Horizon Workspace to synchronize with Horizon View so that users can launch their desktops from Horizon Workspace.


VMwareTV: VMware Forum 2013: Visitor Testimonials

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für VMwareTV: VMware Forum 2013: Visitor Testimonials
Mai 292013
 
At the recent VMware Forum events, we spoke to some of the visitors to see what they learned and enjoyed most about the event.
From: vmwaretv
Views: 58
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Time: 01:47 More in Science & Technology

VMwareTV: A Day in the Life of Sydney Adventist Hospital with VMware View

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für VMwareTV: A Day in the Life of Sydney Adventist Hospital with VMware View
Mai 292013
 
The hospital embarked on an aggressive digization project almost a decade ago. Now, with the major systems in place, this video looks at a typical day in thi...
From: vmwaretv
Views: 339
2 ratings
Time: 03:16 More in Science & Technology