vSphere Distributed Switchチーミングポリシーアラームがトリガーされる (2063381)

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für vSphere Distributed Switchチーミングポリシーアラームがトリガーされる (2063381)
Okt 312013
 
*免責事項*:これは英文の記事 「 vSphere Distributed Switch teaming alarm triggered in vCenter Server (2057667) 」の日本語訳です。記事はベストエフォートで翻訳を� �めているため、ローカライズ化コンテンツは最新情報ではない可能性があります。最新情報は英語版の記事で参照してください。 ・vCenter... Published: 10/31/13

VMware vSphere Blog: Three Hosts, two VSAN Datastores!

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für VMware vSphere Blog: Three Hosts, two VSAN Datastores!
Okt 312013
 

For those of you who have been testing out VSAN, you may realize that a VSAN cluster creates one scale-out datastore across participating hosts. Well, while working on an internal Virtual SAN lab setup, and following my colleague William Lam’s excellent vCenter bootstrap instructions,  I got into a situation where I had a single node vsanDatastore with my vCenter Server Appliance residing on it, and a VSAN enabled vSphere cluster with a second vsanDatastore(1).

So how do I add my single node VSAN host to the existing cluster to achieve a supported VSAN configuration minimum of 3 nodes and a single vsanDatastore? The solution was rather straightforward.

If you try to drag and drop your VSAN single node host into the existing VSAN cluster, this will fail as the VSAN UUIDs will conflict. You would see an alert similar to the below text.

“VSAN cluster UUID mismatch (host: 529d886b-37db-72d6-3511-bfd9843b3f95, destination: 52694edb-6aac-c30f-94e4-3bb30174d0b0) ”

To resolve this conundrum, first I made sure vMotion and VSAN kernel ports were enabled on all three hosts, and migrated my vCenter Server Appliance from vsanDatastore (on the single node) to vsanDatastore(1) within the vSphere cluster.

Next, I went to the command line on the single node VSAN host, and ran the following command.

     esxcli vsan cluster leave

At this point, the single node vsanDatastore will have been destroyed, and you should now only see one vsanDatastore(1) within the vSphere Web Client Datastores inventory list.

At this point, you can now drag and drop your single node host into the vSphere cluster, and if your VSAN cluster is set to Automatic, all the disks within the single node will be automatically added to the cluster!

As I delve further into the product, I have been very impressed with the stability of VSAN, especially in scenarios where some troubleshooting is required.

Happy Halloween!

vCloud Director virtual machine BIOS UUID is not regenerated when deploying to different vCenter Server (2063392)

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für vCloud Director virtual machine BIOS UUID is not regenerated when deploying to different vCenter Server (2063392)
Okt 312013
 
After following the steps in BIOS UUIDs in vCloud Director are not unique when virtual machines are deployed from catalog templates... Published: 10/31/13

VMware Virtualization Management Blog: Accelerate IT Transformation with VMware IT Business Management 8.0

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für VMware Virtualization Management Blog: Accelerate IT Transformation with VMware IT Business Management 8.0
Okt 312013
 

At VMworld Barcelona (October 2013), VMware announced new versions of existing VMware IT Business Management products and the introduction of a new IT Business Management offering focused on cloud infrastructure. The new versions of ITBM Advanced and Enterprise Edition feature new dashboard capabilities focused on key IT Service stakeholders.

The news from Barcelona
If you weren’t able to be in Barcelona to hear the news live on October 15th, VMware announced the new 8.0 version of our IT Business Management Advanced and Enterprise products. We also introduced a completely new offering, IT Business Management Standard version 1.0. Together they make up the VMware IT Business Management Suite – delivering complete transparency and control over the costs and quality of IT services.

Three versions designed to meet any need
In “Get the Cost of Your Private Cloud in Minutes,” I highlighted the exciting capabilities of our newest offering, ITBM Standard. Using IT Business Management Standard, within minutes, you can calculate the fully loaded cost of your entire infrastructure and the cost of each virtual machine – calculated for a specific application or business unit. You can also compare your own internal infrastructure costs to offerings available from public-cloud providers.

IT Business Management Advanced goes a step further and addresses the financial management of your complete IT services portfolio—not just the infrastructure layer. Easily integrated with a broad range of enterprise systems, IT Business Management Advanced includes a service modeling design surface that rapidly builds a comprehensive cost model for all of the IT services delivered to the business. It also includes a robust reporting engine that allows IT to deliver dashboards and reports for each major IT stakeholder and create a “bill of IT” for line-of-business owners. In addition, support for “what-if” planning enables IT to assess the impact of potential investment decisions by services costs before committing funding.

Our IT Business Management Enterprise integrates service-level metrics with financial metrics to holistically understand the quality and financial performance of all IT services. With IT Business Management Enterprise, your IT organization can define, collect, and manage service levels and quality metrics for all IT services and service components—whether IT internal teams or third-party service providers deliver these services.

Enhanced Dashboards In Advanced and Enterprise
One of the areas we focused on for the 8.0 release of IT Business Management Advanced and Enterprise was additional enhancements to the out-of-the-box dashboards included with these editions. Existing product versions already ship with dashboards tailored to the needs of specific IT stakeholders including CIO, CFO of IT, PMO lead, project managers, and IT department heads. With this new release, we have increased the capabilities of these dashboards and made it even easier to quickly tailor them to the needs of individual users.

For a quick introduction to VMware IT Business Management check out the 2-min video, “Introduction to VMware IT Business Management” which provides an excellent overview of the capabilities we deliver. Our Resources page features several other short and useful videos covering how you can use VMware IT Business Management to address financial management topics such as benchmarking, unit cost management, cost modeling, chargeback. There also videos on how to leverage VMware IT Business Management to address both SLA and Vendor management.

Need help addressing your IT service costing and quality management initiative? Contact us and our experts can help your team build the business case and the solution that will maximize your IT productivity. Subscribe to the VMware IT Management blog and follow us on Twitter @vmwareitbm for exclusive content and updates.

VMware End User Computing: No More Crying Wolf: Troubleshooting Performance Issues in a VMware Horizon View Virtual Desktop Implementation

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für VMware End User Computing: No More Crying Wolf: Troubleshooting Performance Issues in a VMware Horizon View Virtual Desktop Implementation
Okt 312013
 

By Cindy Heyer, Contract Technical Writer, Technical Marketing, End-User Computing at VMware; with significant contributions from David Wooten, Product Manager for vCenter Operations Manager for Horizon View, VMware

Nothing is more deadly to a network administrator than a boy who cries wolf. He’s the kid who gets bored tending the family sheep, and thinks it’s funny to yell, “Wolf! Wolf!” Then he gets his kicks watching people falling all over themselves to save a flock of sheep that aren’t in any danger. Crying wolf is a kind of “false positive,” similar to a car alarm that can be triggered by the slightest gust of wind. False positives are bad news because when people are exposed to an alarm too often, they learn to dismiss it. Then when a real wolf makes an entrance, they ignore the cries for help.

vmware-vcenter-operations-manager-horizon-view-boy-crying-wolf

False positives are one of the biggest concerns of network administrators and help desk personnel of large-scale Horizon View deployments who monitor performance issues between connected users. What these administrators need is a network-monitoring tool that will sound the alarm when there’s a serious problem – but not cry wolf. The thing is, lots of tools capture raw data and alert on events large and small. But VMware vCenter Operations Manager for Horizon View (vC Ops for View) squeezes every last bit of operational value out of that data, and tells you the important problems that need your attention. VMware vC Ops for View is an extension of Enterprise vCenter Operations Manager and is uniquely equipped to address performance issues in Horizon View virtual desktop deployments.

The use of dynamic thresholds is one feature that sets VMware vCenter Operations Manager apart. Dynamic thresholds are based on a set of baseline behaviors. VMware vCenter Operations Manager constantly monitors its resources, tracks any behavior that deviates from these baselines, and applies these self-learning dynamic thresholds to adapt to evolving conditions without triggering unnecessary alarms. This can significantly reduce the number of false positive alerts and alarms that more traditional monitoring solutions produce when they use hard thresholds. Most traditional monitoring tools react to spikes or transients by firing an alert, which then causes the administrator to react. Reducing the number of false positives dramatically reduces the time administrators spend troubleshooting.

Administrative personnel can take a proactive approach and correct issues before they impact or degrade end-user performance. Root-cause ranking provides details on exceptions to expected ranges of operation. These expected ranges or dynamic thresholds are created by the vCenter Operations Manager advanced analytics engine and are adjusted on a constant basis.

VMware vCenter Operations Manager for Horizon View can quickly allow diagnosis of problems before they impact the end-user Horizon View experience. Take a look at the following screenshot, where multiple issues are bombarding Windows 7 desktop users connected to Horizon View.

vmware-vcenter-operations-manager-horizon-view-troubleshooting-3

In this window, the administrator selects a Horizon View desktop from the heat map, which reveals that the VM Overall and VM Memory object metrics in the Object Metrics section are at 100 percent.

vmware-vcenter-operations-manager-horizon-view-troubleshooting-3a

Happily, it is clear that the Parent Resources, which include the ESXi host and the Horizon View pool where the desktop is hosted, are performing within normal limits.

vmware-vcenter-operations-manager-horizon-view-troubleshooting-3b

Taking a look at the Child Resources, the administrator notices that a datastore is not performing within normal limits. Further analysis could reveal that the virtual machine workload requires more memory and possibly CPU. The datastore that is hosting these virtual desktops could be over-subscribed, which would cause the virtual machines to exhibit a higher-than-normal workload.

vmware-vcenter-operations-manager-horizon-view-troubleshooting-3c

The administrator returns to the View Main dashboard, and within the View Alerts area, sees that alerts are fired on several connected Horizon View users. (Some metrics can also be collected for users who are logged in but disconnected, but this example pertains to connected sessions only.)

vmware-vcenter-operations-manager-horizon-view-main-dashboard

Clicking the alert displays the reason for the alert, as well as the resource exhibiting the problem. Mousing over the More balloon reveals details about the resource, including the type of adapter collecting the data, the collection interval, and the type of machine.

vmware-vcenter-operations-manager-horizon-view-dashboard-a

In the Impact section of the Alert Summary window, the current health and time are displayed. The health for this connection is currently 25 percent, which indicates that the connected user is experiencing a negative impact on performance.

vmware-vcenter-operations-manager-horizon-view-troubleshooting-1

The health score is a high-level indicator, similar to the Check Engine light in your car. The health score acts as a green or red flag where you can quickly ascertain that all is well, or that it is time to check deeper.

Clicking the Troubleshoot button displays the Resource Detail window. In this example, the root-cause ranking for the connected user indicates that transmit packet loss is occurring in the Horizon View PCoIP network.

Root-cause analysis is a method of problem resolution that starts by identifying the underlying factors that contributed to the problem. Root-cause analysis is based on the assumption that correcting root causes is usually more effective than addressing symptoms. You can try to reduce a person’s fever, for example, but it will keep rising again until you resolve the infection causing it.

One root cause for a low health score for connection can be a high latency value, otherwise known as noise. Noise can be caused by high packet loss and retry rates. Another root cause can be high resource-use combined with high wait times. A high rate of CPU usage that is within dynamic thresholds may not necessarily spell a problem. However, high CPU usage combined with high resource wait times, such as for CPU or I/O, may be indicative of an overloaded resource.

vmware-vcenter-operations-manager-horizon-view-troubleshooting-2

Next, the administrator turns to the Metric Selector. The yellow masking indicates that there is an anomaly in the PCoIP metric. If you expand the metric, you will see that the Transmit Packet Loss Percent metric is outside the expected range of behavior.

When you see how effective vCenter Operations Manager for Horizon View can be to troubleshoot connected-user performance in a VMware Horizon View deployment, you’ll want to know more. See the vC Ops for View Deployment Guide for details about the product and its main components, and additional use cases where the monitoring and troubleshooting tool is useful.

Note: The new vC Ops for View Deployment Guide provides scenarios you typically encounter as you maintain and monitor your Horizon View deployment. This guide shares helpful tips for troubleshooting your Horizon View instance, getting the most out of vC Ops for View, and using it to monitor and troubleshoot your network infrastructure. Additional use-case scenarios will be discussed when future versions of this document are released. If you want to add your input to our list of topics to cover, comment on this blog post.

You can find out more:

To tweet about this blog, contact the VMware End-User Computing Solutions Management and Technical Marketing team at twitter.com/vmwareeucsmtm.

Licensing ThinApp 4.x and 5.x (1021156)

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Licensing ThinApp 4.x and 5.x (1021156)
Okt 312013
 
This article provides the steps to license ThinApp 4.x and 5.x. ThinApp is licensed during the installation process. However, you can change the serial number if required. To change the serial number: 1) Start... Published: 10/31/13
Okt 312013
 

With the vSphere 5.5 release a few weeks back a new feature called Virtual Flash was introduced.

We put together this video which provides an overview of this new Virtual Flash feature and its benefits in a vSphere environment.

In essence, Virtual Flash allows you to accelerate virtual machine performance through the use of local SSD (Solid State) disks, which serve flash memory cache to chosen virtual machines running on the ESXi host. Virtual Flash Read Cache can supply low latency for extreme latency sensitive applications which helps to enable the virtualization of some computer systems/applications previously considered too I/O intensive. Virtual Flash caching is achieved using flash memory in the form of solid state disks (SSDs).

We will be following this video up with some new short and quick tutorials over the next few days which will cover:

  • Allocating Virtual Flash Read Cache to a virtual machine
  • Adjusting the amount of VIrtual Flash Read Cache caching in a virtual machine
  • Disabling Virtual Flash Read Cache caching in a virtual machine

VMware Support Insider: Virtual Flash Feature in vSphere 5.5

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für VMware Support Insider: Virtual Flash Feature in vSphere 5.5
Okt 312013
 

With the vSphere 5.5 release a few weeks back a new feature called Virtual Flash was introduced.

We put together this video which provides an overview of this new Virtual Flash feature and its benefits in a vSphere environment.

In essence, Virtual Flash allows you to accelerate virtual machine performance through the use of local SSD (Solid State) disks, which serve flash memory cache to chosen virtual machines running on the ESXi host. Virtual Flash Read Cache can supply low latency for extreme latency sensitive applications which helps to enable the virtualization of some computer systems/applications previously considered too I/O intensive. Virtual Flash caching is achieved using flash memory in the form of solid state disks (SSDs).

We will be following this video up with some new short and quick tutorials over the next few days which will cover:

  • Allocating Virtual Flash Read Cache to a virtual machine
  • Adjusting the amount of VIrtual Flash Read Cache caching in a virtual machine
  • Disabling Virtual Flash Read Cache caching in a virtual machine

VMware End User Computing: Moving Beyond IOPs for VDI

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für VMware End User Computing: Moving Beyond IOPs for VDI
Okt 312013
 

By Courtney Burry, Director of Product Marketing, and Tristan Todd, Reference Architect Engineer, End-User Computing, VMware

When it comes to desktop virtualization, one of the places you will end up spending a lot of your time is on storage planning and design. Given that 50%+ of the cost associated with most VDI deployments comes from storage—it’s definitely worth the time and effort to do your homework in advance.

But wading through the sea of storage vendors can often leave you wondering what’s really good enough. Undoubtedly, you will see the majority of storage websites touting thousands and millions of IOPS and promising unbeatable performance. But as many folks like Howard Marks and Scott Lowe have pointed out—getting good application performance is not all about IOPS. Even if an all-flash solution promises to deliver over 1M 4K random IOPS with a 60/40 read/write mix, you’ll want to make sure you know how much latency you’re dealing with. And this, as Marks points out, is because as an application or benchmark stresses your storage system, you may find that it continues to deliver high IOPS but at higher levels of latency.

So rather than getting too hung up on steady-state IOPS recommendations by these storage vendors for any VDI deployment, take some time to focus on disk latency.

Evaluating Latency

When it comes to assessing latency, you will want to look up and down the storage stack and get a clear understanding of where latency can build up.

Ultimately you will want to look first and foremost at the top layer of your storage stack, where the application is running in the guest operating system. This will give you the total amount of latency that the application is seeing. Virtual-disk latency is one of the key metrics that drives good or bad user experience.

However, as many of you are aware if you are using vSphere today, ESXi cannot see application latency because it is above the ESXi stack. But ESXi can detect three types of latency that are also reported back into esxtop and vCenter. First and foremost is GAVG or guest latency. GAVG is made up of 2 major components: KAVG and DAVG.

DAVG is the measure of time that I/O commands spend in the device from the driver HBA to the backend storage array, and KAVG is how much time I/O spends in the ESXi Kernel.

It’s worth noting that KAVG is actually a derived metric, which means you won’t specifically calculate KAVG; you just calculate GAVG (Total Latency) and DAVG (Device Latency) and derive KAVG from the difference (Total Latency – DAVG = KAVG).

In addition, the VMKernel is very efficient in processing I/O, so there really should not be any significant wait in the kernel or KAVG. And in a well-configured, well-running VDI environment, KAVG should be equal to 0. If your KAVG is not equal to 0, then more than likely the I/O is stuck in a Kernel Queue inside the VMKernel.

To get a sense of the latency that the application will see in the Guest OS, you can simply compare the GAVG and the actual latency the application is seeing (through a tool like PerfMon). This will reveal how much latency the Guest OS is adding to the storage stack. For instance, if ESX is reporting GAVG of 10ms, but the application or PerfMon in the guest OS is reporting storage latency of 30ms, then 20ms of latency is somehow building up in the Guest OS Layer, and you should focus your debugging to the Guest OS storage configuration.

Monitoring Latency

So how do you measure and monitor GAVG and DAVG? VMware vCenter and vCenter™ Operations Manager for Horizon View™ are good places to start. VMware vCenter provides alarms that will trigger if device latency is too high or if a virtual machine is using an excessive amount of storage bandwidth. One thing to be aware of is that vCenter uses a 20-second sample period, so it may miss some spiky performance issues, but it is a good first start. VMware vCenter Operations Manager for Horizon View provides an even more comprehensive view of the health of your VDI stack, with a robust set of analytics that will allow you to quickly troubleshoot and remediate your storage and environment.

Moving Forward

Good storage performance is critical to any VDI rollout, and making sure you opt for the right solution is key. So be sure to look beyond IOPS and spend your time examining and monitoring latencies across the storage stack to make sure you can deliver the performance your end users need.

VMware Education & Certification Blog: FREE eLearning: Virtualizing Microsoft SQL Server 2012 with VMware [V5.X] Fundamentals

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für VMware Education & Certification Blog: FREE eLearning: Virtualizing Microsoft SQL Server 2012 with VMware [V5.X] Fundamentals
Okt 312013
 

New FREE eLearning Virtualizing Microsoft SQL Server 2012 with VMware [V5.x] Fundamentals is now available.  In this 3 hour course, you’ll learn of the pittfalls commonly encountered when experienced VMware vSphere professionals cross the chasm of Tier-1 SQL Server virtualization.

The price is right, so sign up today!

Upgrading the vSphere Web Client to vSphere 5.5 fails with the error: Error 29107. The service or solution user already …

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Upgrading the vSphere Web Client to vSphere 5.5 fails with the error: Error 29107. The service or solution user already …
Okt 312013
 
Upgrading the vSphere Web Client to vSphere 5.5 fails with the error: Error 29107. The service or solution user already registered · Upgrading the vSphere Web Client fails. · You see an error similar to: Error 29107. The service or solution... Published: 10/31/13

Backing up and restoring the vCenter Server Appliance Inventory Service database (2062682)

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Backing up and restoring the vCenter Server Appliance Inventory Service database (2062682)
Okt 312013
 
This article provides steps to back up and restore the vCenter Server Appliance (VCSA) Inventory Service database. Before you begin, ensure you have these... Published: 10/31/13

vNUMA is disabled if VCPU hotplug is enabled (2040375)

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für vNUMA is disabled if VCPU hotplug is enabled (2040375)
Okt 312013
 
If virtual NUMA is configured with VCPU hotplug settings, the virtual machine will be started without virtual NUMA and instead it will use Uniform Memory Access with interleaved memory access.... Published: 10/31/13

VMware Consulting Blog: Are You Optimizing your SAP Virtualization?

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für VMware Consulting Blog: Are You Optimizing your SAP Virtualization?
Okt 312013
 

If you are virtualizing an SAP environment running business-critical applications, chances are these questions will sound familiar: Am I optimizing my SAP virtualization for the maximum benefit? What measures should I take to avoid negative business impact when running SAP production workloads on the VMware virtualized platform?

Luckily, VMware Consulting Architect Girish Manmadkar recently shared his advice on this topic.

To make sure you are designing and sizing your infrastructure for optimum business benefit, Girish suggests two new questions to ask yourself, your IT organization, and your vendors.

1. How will this environment need to scale?

2. Am I sizing my environment to support 3-to-5 years of growth?

When you understand the needs outlined by these questions, you can then work with hardware vendors, as well as your VMware and SAP teams, to find the best solution.

From an operational standpoint, there are also efficiencies within the SAP environment once it is virtualized that you want to be sure to take advantage of.

1. Scaling out during the month-end and quarter-end processing is a snap compared to the hours it can take otherwise.

2. Products like vCenter Operations Manger help make sure your SAP basis admin and VMware admin are always on the same page, making it far faster and easier to troubleshoot the environment.

3. You’ll be able to provide the operations team with 24-hours monitoring of the entire SAP virtual infrastructure, allowing for a proactive approach to minimize or eliminate downtime.

Check out Girish’s video, above, for more details.


Girish Manmadkar is a veteran VMware SAP Virtualization Architect with extensive knowledge and hand-on experience with various SAP and VMware products, including various databases. He focuses on SAP migrations, architecture designs, and implementation, including disaster recovery.


VMware for Small-Medium Business Blog: Considering Hybrid Cloud? Three Reasons Why You Should

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für VMware for Small-Medium Business Blog: Considering Hybrid Cloud? Three Reasons Why You Should
Okt 312013
 

Hybrid cloud is becoming an increasingly popular buzzword, but still, some may wonder, “Why should I make the transition to hybrid cloud?”

The true hybrid cloud gives customers choice – the choice to deploy workloads in the best location, based on that particular workload’s security needs, performance needs and scalability needs. If you’re still on the fence as to why you should make the leap to the hybrid cloud, here are three key reasons why you should definitely consider it: reliability, flexibility, and scalability.

1) Reliability

With hybrid cloud, there are no surprises – it delivers the security, performance, and technical support that all enterprise IT organizations need. When it comes to the migration of data between your internal data center and your cloud, you need the confidence that your data is being transferred both safely and securely. With a true hybrid cloud, you can apply the security and control that you have in your private environment to the public cloud – giving enterprise IT groups the opportunity to designate which situations make sense for the public cloud and what type of data they can move to the public cloud.

2) Flexibility

Choice is the magic word when it comes to the hybrid cloud. Hybrid cloud enables you to deploy workloads in your preferred location, whether in your own data center or to the public cloud, and to decide where to run, manage, and build applications. Through the hybrid cloud, IT organizations can give developers the power to build faster and roll out new applications, by giving them access to public cloud resources where it makes sense. Then, within the same management environment, moving workloads back into a private cloud environment within the date center when that makes more sense.

3) Scalability

Hybrid cloud is not only flexible, but also dynamically scalable. It allows IT professionals to expand upon established applications and internal systems as needed, and offers users the tools they need to handle sudden changes in demand in order to maintain high-speed performance and high availability. Ultimately, a true hybrid cloud enables users to rapidly scale their IT operations without needing to change anything.

Watch Dave Bartoletti, Senior Analyst at Forrester, as he further discusses the benefits of hybrid cloud:

In sum, an ideal hybrid cloud strategy should make infrastructure that you own as easy to consume as infrastructure from the public cloud, and vice versa, it should make infrastructure from the public cloud as easy to manage and control as infrastructure you own.

The VMware vCloud Hybrid Service is a dynamic and powerful hybrid cloud solution that allows you to seamlessly move your existing data center to the cloud. Designed for the most challenging IT environments, the vCloud Hybrid Service offers the power, security and reliability you need, with the speed to help take your organization to the cloud in minutes.

For more information about making the move to the vCloud Hybrid Service, visit vCloud.VMware.com.

For future updates, follow us on Twitter and Facebook at @vCloud and Facebook.com/VMwarevCloud.

Follow VMware SMB on Facebook, Twitter, Spiceworks and Google+ for more blog posts, conversation with your peers, and additional insights on IT issues facing small to midmarket businesses.