Feature Updates: February 2015

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Feature Updates: February 2015
Feb 282015
 

This month, we’re releasing the last wave of our External Contributors enhancements (for now!). If you haven’t used this feature, we highly recommend trying it out in your community today. External collaboration with customers, vendors, partners, and contractors in a secure and private manner is vital to getting work done in the modern workplace, and a major reason why we’ve invested in enhancing our External Contributor feature. Many Socialcast customers are already leveraging this feature to foster a virtual, collaborative workspace with people outside of their organization. These External Contributor groups facilitate knowledge sharing, promote ideation and make it easy to distribute large documents — all of which help to streamline communication with external parties and make everyone’s lives easier.To learn more about this feature, visit our External Contributor Overview here, and check out the other features we have for the month of February* below:

1. Improved Visual Distinctions for External Contributors

Even though conversations with External Contributors are limited to private External-facing groups within Socialcast, our customers have expressed concern that employees might inadvertently expose sensitive information to people outside of the organization. With this release, we have revamped the entire visual interface to highlight and better distinguish all interactions with External Contributors.

Changes include:

  • A new External Contributor avatar/icon – This “visitor badge” icon will appear on the External-facing Group page, an external user’s profile picture, thumbnail, and mini profile.
  • Updated warning banner at the top of the External-facing group page that reads: “This group has members from outside of [Community Name].”

  • Added the text “(External Contributor)” next to the user’s Title – This will appear in the user’s profile and mini profile.

  • A new “visitor badge” icon next the External-facing groups name in the title header of a post – this will also appear in the Search Results page
  • A new warning label that will appear as you write a comment that can be seen in an External-facing group. The warning label reads “This comment will be visible to external contributors” and the comment box will be highlighted in yellow.

Note: The yellow color used for External Contributors cannot be customized or changed at this time

2. In-App Notifications for External Contributors

In addition to the email notifications, External Contributors will now receive in-app notifications for all new activity through the classic orange notification dialog in the top right corner of the page.

3. Exposed Admin Flag for Enabling/Disabling External Contributors

With all the improvements we’ve made over the past few months around External Contributors, we’re now ready to officially pass the baton over to Community Admins. Enable External Contributors for your community today!

To configure the settings of this feature, go to Admin Settings > Features > External Contributor. This feature is enabled by default. When disabling this functionality, it is important to remember the following cases:

  • Disabling External Contributors does not revoke access for all existing external members already in the community. As an Admin, you can remove existing external members from Admin Settings > User Management
  • Disabling this flag means that new external members cannot be invited to join the community, all pending invites will no longer be honored, and new External-facing Groups cannot be created
  • Disabling this feature will automatically disable the External Contributor setting related to LDAP provisioning. This option can be found at Admin Settings > Provisioning > Exclude from LDAP provisioning
  • Disabling this feature will also disable any Permissions related to External Contributors. This can be found at Admin Settings > External Contributor > Permissions
  • If an Admin later enables the External Contributors feature, the above two options will resume its setting before External Contributors was disabled, or on, by default.

Other Enhancements

4. View Fewer Comments

As you’re reading through a long comment thread, you can now collapse the comments by clicking “View fewer comments” from the top of the comments thread.

5. Simplified Login Flow for Mobile Apps

Many of our customers have provided feedback around the login flow on our mobile apps, requesting for a more simplified process. Based on that feedback, we have enhanced the mobile app login flow by reducing the number of clicks/screens to login to your community! The flow will be:

  • Screen 1 – Product Tour & Community URL
  • Screen 2 – Community Sign In

*Please note that On-Premise clients will receive these features in a future release.

Feature Updates: February 2015

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Feature Updates: February 2015
Feb 282015
 

This month, we’re releasing the last wave of our External Contributors enhancements (for now!). If you haven’t used this feature, we highly recommend trying it out in your community today. External collaboration with customers, vendors, partners, and contractors in a secure and private manner is vital to getting work done in the modern workplace, and a major reason why we’ve invested in enhancing our External Contributor feature. Many Socialcast customers are already leveraging this feature to foster a virtual, collaborative workspace with people outside of their organization. These External Contributor groups facilitate knowledge sharing, promote ideation and make it easy to distribute large documents — all of which help to streamline communication with external parties and make everyone’s lives easier.To learn more about this feature, visit our External Contributor Overview here, and check out the other features we have for the month of February* below:

1. Improved Visual Distinctions for External Contributors

Even though conversations with External Contributors are limited to private External-facing groups within Socialcast, our customers have expressed concern that employees might inadvertently expose sensitive information to people outside of the organization. With this release, we have revamped the entire visual interface to highlight and better distinguish all interactions with External Contributors.

Changes include:

  • A new External Contributor avatar/icon – This “visitor badge” icon will appear on the External-facing Group page, an external user’s profile picture, thumbnail, and mini profile.
  • Updated warning banner at the top of the External-facing group page that reads: “This group has members from outside of [Community Name].”

  • Added the text “(External Contributor)” next to the user’s Title – This will appear in the user’s profile and mini profile.

  • A new “visitor badge” icon next the External-facing groups name in the title header of a post – this will also appear in the Search Results page
  • A new warning label that will appear as you write a comment that can be seen in an External-facing group. The warning label reads “This comment will be visible to external contributors” and the comment box will be highlighted in yellow.

Note: The yellow color used for External Contributors cannot be customized or changed at this time

2. In-App Notifications for External Contributors

In addition to the email notifications, External Contributors will now receive in-app notifications for all new activity through the classic orange notification dialog in the top right corner of the page.

3. Exposed Admin Flag for Enabling/Disabling External Contributors

With all the improvements we’ve made over the past few months around External Contributors, we’re now ready to officially pass the baton over to Community Admins. Enable External Contributors for your community today!

To configure the settings of this feature, go to Admin Settings > Features > External Contributor. This feature is enabled by default. When disabling this functionality, it is important to remember the following cases:

  • Disabling External Contributors does not revoke access for all existing external members already in the community. As an Admin, you can remove existing external members from Admin Settings > User Management
  • Disabling this flag means that new external members cannot be invited to join the community, all pending invites will no longer be honored, and new External-facing Groups cannot be created
  • Disabling this feature will automatically disable the External Contributor setting related to LDAP provisioning. This option can be found at Admin Settings > Provisioning > Exclude from LDAP provisioning
  • Disabling this feature will also disable any Permissions related to External Contributors. This can be found at Admin Settings > External Contributor > Permissions
  • If an Admin later enables the External Contributors feature, the above two options will resume its setting before External Contributors was disabled, or on, by default.

Other Enhancements

4. View Fewer Comments

As you’re reading through a long comment thread, you can now collapse the comments by clicking “View fewer comments” from the top of the comments thread.

5. Simplified Login Flow for Mobile Apps

Many of our customers have provided feedback around the login flow on our mobile apps, requesting for a more simplified process. Based on that feedback, we have enhanced the mobile app login flow by reducing the number of clicks/screens to login to your community! The flow will be:

  • Screen 1 – Product Tour & Community URL
  • Screen 2 – Community Sign In

*Please note that On-Premise clients will receive these features in a future release.

Feature Updates: February 2015

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Feature Updates: February 2015
Feb 282015
 

This month, we’re releasing the last wave of our External Contributors enhancements (for now!). If you haven’t used this feature, we highly recommend trying it out in your community today. External collaboration with customers, vendors, partners, and contractors in a secure and private manner is vital to getting work done in the modern workplace, and a major reason why we’ve invested in enhancing our External Contributor feature. Many Socialcast customers are already leveraging this feature to foster a virtual, collaborative workspace with people outside of their organization. These External Contributor groups facilitate knowledge sharing, promote ideation and make it easy to distribute large documents — all of which help to streamline communication with external parties and make everyone’s lives easier.To learn more about this feature, visit our External Contributor Overview here, and check out the other features we have for the month of February* below:

1. Improved Visual Distinctions for External Contributors

Even though conversations with External Contributors are limited to private External-facing groups within Socialcast, our customers have expressed concern that employees might inadvertently expose sensitive information to people outside of the organization. With this release, we have revamped the entire visual interface to highlight and better distinguish all interactions with External Contributors.

Changes include:

  • A new External Contributor avatar/icon – This “visitor badge” icon will appear on the External-facing Group page, an external user’s profile picture, thumbnail, and mini profile.
  • Updated warning banner at the top of the External-facing group page that reads: “This group has members from outside of [Community Name].”

  • Added the text “(External Contributor)” next to the user’s Title – This will appear in the user’s profile and mini profile.

  • A new “visitor badge” icon next the External-facing groups name in the title header of a post – this will also appear in the Search Results page
  • A new warning label that will appear as you write a comment that can be seen in an External-facing group. The warning label reads “This comment will be visible to external contributors” and the comment box will be highlighted in yellow.

Note: The yellow color used for External Contributors cannot be customized or changed at this time

2. In-App Notifications for External Contributors

In addition to the email notifications, External Contributors will now receive in-app notifications for all new activity through the classic orange notification dialog in the top right corner of the page.

3. Exposed Admin Flag for Enabling/Disabling External Contributors

With all the improvements we’ve made over the past few months around External Contributors, we’re now ready to officially pass the baton over to Community Admins. Enable External Contributors for your community today!

To configure the settings of this feature, go to Admin Settings > Features > External Contributor. This feature is enabled by default. When disabling this functionality, it is important to remember the following cases:

  • Disabling External Contributors does not revoke access for all existing external members already in the community. As an Admin, you can remove existing external members from Admin Settings > User Management
  • Disabling this flag means that new external members cannot be invited to join the community, all pending invites will no longer be honored, and new External-facing Groups cannot be created
  • Disabling this feature will automatically disable the External Contributor setting related to LDAP provisioning. This option can be found at Admin Settings > Provisioning > Exclude from LDAP provisioning
  • Disabling this feature will also disable any Permissions related to External Contributors. This can be found at Admin Settings > External Contributor > Permissions
  • If an Admin later enables the External Contributors feature, the above two options will resume its setting before External Contributors was disabled, or on, by default.

Other Enhancements

4. View Fewer Comments

As you’re reading through a long comment thread, you can now collapse the comments by clicking “View fewer comments” from the top of the comments thread.

5. Simplified Login Flow for Mobile Apps

Many of our customers have provided feedback around the login flow on our mobile apps, requesting for a more simplified process. Based on that feedback, we have enhanced the mobile app login flow by reducing the number of clicks/screens to login to your community! The flow will be:

  • Screen 1 – Product Tour & Community URL
  • Screen 2 – Community Sign In

*Please note that On-Premise clients will receive these features in a future release.

Feature Updates: February 2015

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Feature Updates: February 2015
Feb 282015
 

This month, we’re releasing the last wave of our External Contributors enhancements (for now!). If you haven’t used this feature, we highly recommend trying it out in your community today. External collaboration with customers, vendors, partners, and contractors in a secure and private manner is vital to getting work done in the modern workplace, and a major reason why we’ve invested in enhancing our External Contributor feature. Many Socialcast customers are already leveraging this feature to foster a virtual, collaborative workspace with people outside of their organization. These External Contributor groups facilitate knowledge sharing, promote ideation and make it easy to distribute large documents — all of which help to streamline communication with external parties and make everyone’s lives easier.To learn more about this feature, visit our External Contributor Overview here, and check out the other features we have for the month of February* below:

1. Improved Visual Distinctions for External Contributors

Even though conversations with External Contributors are limited to private External-facing groups within Socialcast, our customers have expressed concern that employees might inadvertently expose sensitive information to people outside of the organization. With this release, we have revamped the entire visual interface to highlight and better distinguish all interactions with External Contributors.

Changes include:

  • A new External Contributor avatar/icon – This “visitor badge” icon will appear on the External-facing Group page, an external user’s profile picture, thumbnail, and mini profile.
  • Updated warning banner at the top of the External-facing group page that reads: “This group has members from outside of [Community Name].”

  • Added the text “(External Contributor)” next to the user’s Title – This will appear in the user’s profile and mini profile.

  • A new “visitor badge” icon next the External-facing groups name in the title header of a post – this will also appear in the Search Results page
  • A new warning label that will appear as you write a comment that can be seen in an External-facing group. The warning label reads “This comment will be visible to external contributors” and the comment box will be highlighted in yellow.

Note: The yellow color used for External Contributors cannot be customized or changed at this time

2. In-App Notifications for External Contributors

In addition to the email notifications, External Contributors will now receive in-app notifications for all new activity through the classic orange notification dialog in the top right corner of the page.

3. Exposed Admin Flag for Enabling/Disabling External Contributors

With all the improvements we’ve made over the past few months around External Contributors, we’re now ready to officially pass the baton over to Community Admins. Enable External Contributors for your community today!

To configure the settings of this feature, go to Admin Settings > Features > External Contributor. This feature is enabled by default. When disabling this functionality, it is important to remember the following cases:

  • Disabling External Contributors does not revoke access for all existing external members already in the community. As an Admin, you can remove existing external members from Admin Settings > User Management
  • Disabling this flag means that new external members cannot be invited to join the community, all pending invites will no longer be honored, and new External-facing Groups cannot be created
  • Disabling this feature will automatically disable the External Contributor setting related to LDAP provisioning. This option can be found at Admin Settings > Provisioning > Exclude from LDAP provisioning
  • Disabling this feature will also disable any Permissions related to External Contributors. This can be found at Admin Settings > External Contributor > Permissions
  • If an Admin later enables the External Contributors feature, the above two options will resume its setting before External Contributors was disabled, or on, by default.

Other Enhancements

4. View Fewer Comments

As you’re reading through a long comment thread, you can now collapse the comments by clicking “View fewer comments” from the top of the comments thread.

5. Simplified Login Flow for Mobile Apps

Many of our customers have provided feedback around the login flow on our mobile apps, requesting for a more simplified process. Based on that feedback, we have enhanced the mobile app login flow by reducing the number of clicks/screens to login to your community! The flow will be:

  • Screen 1 – Product Tour & Community URL
  • Screen 2 – Community Sign In

*Please note that On-Premise clients will receive these features in a future release.

Delivering Secure and Scalable Desktop as a Service

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Delivering Secure and Scalable Desktop as a Service
Feb 282015
 
Guest Blog by Dwayne Lessner, Technical Marketing Engineer, Nutanix, @dlink7 Security and flexibility don’t often end up in the same sentence, especially when it comes to delivering IT as a service. But VMware Horizon Air and Nutanix hyper-converged infrastructure together are able to deliver the same value proposition with our validated reference architecture for desktop […]]> Guest Blog by Dwayne Lessner, Technical Marketing Engineer, Nutanix, @dlink7

Security and flexibility don’t often end up in the same sentence, especially when it comes to delivering IT as a service. But VMware Horizon Air and Nutanix hyper-converged infrastructure together are able to deliver the same value proposition with our validated reference architecture for desktop and applications as a service (DaaS).

Together, VMware and Nutanix provide what is arguably one of the best solutions for secure multi-tenant desktops for service providers and the enterprise.

VMware bought Desktone because it was the market leader for DaaS and the architecture was ideal for creating a scalable model for multiple tenants. However, to make the most of what was later renamed VMware Horizon Air, service providers and enterprises had to reimagine their compute and storage strategies for secure multi-tenant deployments.

As a function of our web-scale architecture, Nutanix hyper-converged infrastructure provides several different options for secure deployment of VMware Horizon Air. As a service provider, you can have one large cluster and carve out different hosts and volumes for your tenants. Each tenant can reserve the amount of storage in the cluster needed to provide desktops. Data locality can ensure that noisy tenants don’t impact the performance of their neighbors.

Over the past few weeks, we have been working together to create validated designs for VMware Horizon Air 6.1 running on vSphere 5.5 with Nutanix hyper-converged infrastructure. The following graph shows a LoginVSI run of 300 Windows 7 (64-bit) knowledge worker desktops (2vCPU) with Nutanix elastic deduplication turned on (in-line and post-process). The 300 desktops are on 3 out of 4 nodes running Login VSI 4.1, using its own datastore (Nutanix container) called ‘Tenant A’.

We ran a variety of virtual machines, including four IOanalyzer VMs, two “Max IOPS” workloads, and two running “Max Write” IOPS on the fourth node to simulate a noisy neighbor scenario. The 4-node had over 18,000 IOPS generated on its datastore called Tenant B. Both Tenant A and B were both serviced by the same Nutanix cluster.

Figure 1 – Tenant B running over 18,000 IOPS doesn’t affect the results of the other nodes in the cluster.

 

Figure 2 – 300 desktops able to run fine, even though Tenant B is running a storage intensive workload.

 

The 300 virtual desktops ran without any disruption or impact from noisy storage-intensive VMs running on the fourth node and did not reach their VSI Max. This validation exercise highlights how multiple tenants can be supported on the same Nutanix cluster without worrying about performance impacts or security challenges.

If you want to provide physical separation between two clients, multiple individual small clusters can be used for your tenants and managed with Nutanix Prism Central. Prism Central offers a single framework/UI for service providers to manage multiple clusters. This approach can reduce the failure domain to one tenant and provide the purist form of security in the way of physical segregation.

VMware Horizon Air supports full clone desktops and can take advantage of native storage integration offered by VMware vCenter. Nutanix is a fully supported and the only certified hyper-converged appliance vendor to support the vStorage APIs for Array Integration(VAAI) today. This is very important for speed and reducing the amount of overall storage needed.

Security and flexibility challenges can be easily addressed with Nutanix and VMware, while providing a consistent user experience across all users.

We will be publishing a detailed reference architecture covering the best practices of our jointly validated designs in the coming weeks. To get a sneak peak or to learn more about our joint solution for delivering Desktop as a Service, drop us a note at info@nutanix.com, download our solution brief or follow-up through Twitter @Nutanix using the hashtag #DaaS.

You can also get more updates from VMware by visiting them on Facebook, following them on Twitter, or discussing in their Communities.

Delivering Secure and Scalable Desktop as a Service

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Delivering Secure and Scalable Desktop as a Service
Feb 282015
 
Guest Blog by Dwayne Lessner, Technical Marketing Engineer, Nutanix, @dlink7 Security and flexibility don’t often end up in the same sentence, especially when it comes to delivering IT as a service. But VMware Horizon Air and Nutanix hyper-converged infrastructure together are able to deliver the same value proposition with our validated reference architecture for desktop […]]> Guest Blog by Dwayne Lessner, Technical Marketing Engineer, Nutanix, @dlink7

Security and flexibility don’t often end up in the same sentence, especially when it comes to delivering IT as a service. But VMware Horizon Air and Nutanix hyper-converged infrastructure together are able to deliver the same value proposition with our validated reference architecture for desktop and applications as a service (DaaS).

Together, VMware and Nutanix provide what is arguably one of the best solutions for secure multi-tenant desktops for service providers and the enterprise.

VMware bought Desktone because it was the market leader for DaaS and the architecture was ideal for creating a scalable model for multiple tenants. However, to make the most of what was later renamed VMware Horizon Air, service providers and enterprises had to reimagine their compute and storage strategies for secure multi-tenant deployments.

As a function of our web-scale architecture, Nutanix hyper-converged infrastructure provides several different options for secure deployment of VMware Horizon Air. As a service provider, you can have one large cluster and carve out different hosts and volumes for your tenants. Each tenant can reserve the amount of storage in the cluster needed to provide desktops. Data locality can ensure that noisy tenants don’t impact the performance of their neighbors.

Over the past few weeks, we have been working together to create validated designs for VMware Horizon Air 6.1 running on vSphere 5.5 with Nutanix hyper-converged infrastructure. The following graph shows a LoginVSI run of 300 Windows 7 (64-bit) knowledge worker desktops (2vCPU) with Nutanix elastic deduplication turned on (in-line and post-process). The 300 desktops are on 3 out of 4 nodes running Login VSI 4.1, using its own datastore (Nutanix container) called ‘Tenant A’.

We ran a variety of virtual machines, including four IOanalyzer VMs, two “Max IOPS” workloads, and two running “Max Write” IOPS on the fourth node to simulate a noisy neighbor scenario. The 4-node had over 18,000 IOPS generated on its datastore called Tenant B. Both Tenant A and B were both serviced by the same Nutanix cluster.

Figure 1 – Tenant B running over 18,000 IOPS doesn’t affect the results of the other nodes in the cluster.

 

Figure 2 – 300 desktops able to run fine, even though Tenant B is running a storage intensive workload.

 

The 300 virtual desktops ran without any disruption or impact from noisy storage-intensive VMs running on the fourth node and did not reach their VSI Max. This validation exercise highlights how multiple tenants can be supported on the same Nutanix cluster without worrying about performance impacts or security challenges.

If you want to provide physical separation between two clients, multiple individual small clusters can be used for your tenants and managed with Nutanix Prism Central. Prism Central offers a single framework/UI for service providers to manage multiple clusters. This approach can reduce the failure domain to one tenant and provide the purist form of security in the way of physical segregation.

VMware Horizon Air supports full clone desktops and can take advantage of native storage integration offered by VMware vCenter. Nutanix is a fully supported and the only certified hyper-converged appliance vendor to support the vStorage APIs for Array Integration(VAAI) today. This is very important for speed and reducing the amount of overall storage needed.

Security and flexibility challenges can be easily addressed with Nutanix and VMware, while providing a consistent user experience across all users.

We will be publishing a detailed reference architecture covering the best practices of our jointly validated designs in the coming weeks. To get a sneak peak or to learn more about our joint solution for delivering Desktop as a Service, drop us a note at info@nutanix.com, download our solution brief or follow-up through Twitter @Nutanix using the hashtag #DaaS.

You can also get more updates from VMware by visiting them on Facebook, following them on Twitter, or discussing in their Communities.

Celebrating Engineers Week 2015 | #eweek2015

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Celebrating Engineers Week 2015 | #eweek2015
Feb 272015
 
Happy Engineers Week! Here at Tribal Knowledge we believe that Engineers Week is more than a single event. It’s a year-round commitment to celebrate how engineers make a difference in our world. In partnership with the VMware Careers Blog, Tribal Knowledge is using this special week to kick off theVMware Innovation Series. Each month we’ll […]]> http://blogs.vmware.com/tribalknowledge/2015/02/celebrating-engineers-week-2015-eweek2015.html/feed 0 VMware Heads to Mobile World Congress http://blogs.vmware.com/tribalknowledge/2015/02/vmware-heads-mobile-world-congress.html?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=vmware-heads-mobile-world-congress http://blogs.vmware.com/tribalknowledge/2015/02/vmware-heads-mobile-world-congress.html#comments Fri, 27 Feb 2015 17:17:37 +0000

Celebrating Engineers Week 2015 | #eweek2015

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Celebrating Engineers Week 2015 | #eweek2015
Feb 272015
 
Happy Engineers Week! Here at Tribal Knowledge we believe that Engineers Week is more than a single event. It’s a year-round commitment to celebrate how engineers make a difference in our world. In partnership with the VMware Careers Blog, Tribal Knowledge is using this special week to kick off theVMware Innovation Series. Each month we’ll […]]> http://blogs.vmware.com/tribalknowledge/2015/02/celebrating-engineers-week-2015-eweek2015.html/feed 0 VMware Heads to Mobile World Congress http://blogs.vmware.com/tribalknowledge/2015/02/vmware-heads-mobile-world-congress.html?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=vmware-heads-mobile-world-congress http://blogs.vmware.com/tribalknowledge/2015/02/vmware-heads-mobile-world-congress.html#comments Fri, 27 Feb 2015 17:17:37 +0000

Enterprise mobility news recap: Feb 23 – 27

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Enterprise mobility news recap: Feb 23 – 27
Feb 272015
 
The hourly countdown has begun for Mobile World Congress as technology journalists line up their predictions for new releases and anticipate keynote sessions from Mark Zuckerberg and Tom Wheeler of the FCC. The public sector had its fair share of industry news considering new FCC regulations and the U.S. Department of Treasury’s newly accepted monetary […]]> http://blogs.air-watch.com/2015/02/enterprise-mobility-news-recap-feb-23-27/feed/ 0 AirWatch to integrate with Android for Work http://blogs.air-watch.com/2015/02/airwatch-integrate-android-work/ http://blogs.air-watch.com/2015/02/airwatch-integrate-android-work/#comments Wed, 25 Feb 2015 19:04:25 +0000

Workspace Environment Management with Horizon

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Workspace Environment Management with Horizon
Feb 272015
 
By Sachin Sharma, Product Marketing, End-User Computing, VMware A constant theme I hear when talking to customers about managing their virtual, physical, and cloud-hosted environments tends to center around the challenges they face with applications and users. In particular, the questions that customers are looking to solve are ones like how can I simplify management […]]> By Sachin Sharma, Product Marketing, End-User Computing, VMware

A constant theme I hear when talking to customers about managing their virtual, physical, and cloud-hosted environments tends to center around the challenges they face with applications and users. In particular, the questions that customers are looking to solve are ones like how can I simplify management of my 100s of apps throughout their lifecycle, from provisioning, to updating, to dealing with app conflicts? How can I optimize delivery of applications to all the different environments, devices, and users I manage? How can I drive down costs of managing user personas while delivering a consistent experience across devices? And these are just some of the questions I hear. Well, we’ve been working to help tackle these challenges with a complete Workspace Environment Management solution using our Horizon technologies.

What is Workspace Environment Management? It’s an end-to-end approach to application and end-user management across physical, virtual, and cloud-hosted desktop environments. This approach enables IT organizations to effectively isolate and deliver applications in real-time, monitor performance, and map persona and policies to best meet end-user requirements across devices and locations. These capabilities allow IT to simplify producing and delivering applications and user policies, and end-users to consume applications as a service independent of device and location. Bridget Botelho from Tech Target has a complementary explanation in her Q&A with Harry Labana, VP Products for EUC at VMware.

 

 

So, how does VMware fit into this space? By using a variety of technologies available in Horizon, VMware is uniquely positioned to help customers deliver and manage apps and end-users across any environment. These environments can be virtual, physical, and even cloud-hosted. Horizon enables applications to effectively be isolated, delivered, published and monitored in real-time. This in turn helps optimize the way organizations manage workspace environments, along with driving down infrastructure and management costs. Let’s take a look at what this means in the context of the Horizon offering…

App Isolation and Delivery

To begin–using VMware ThinApp, apps can be isolated so as to avoid app conflicts, or running legacy apps on newer operating systems for example. App isolation helps lower TCO by reducing or eliminating the need to install applications when needed. Simply isolate the apps to run independent of the underlying OS.

With Horizon, apps and desktops can be provisioned using a single and secure platform via Horizon RDSH capabilities. This includes published applications and desktops. With our latest release of Horizon, we now offer full RDS Hosted Apps support, Windows Media Multimedia Redirection (MMR), Scanner Redirection, and HTML Access for RDS desktops. These capabilities help streamline management for better user experience across the WAN.

A key component of WEM is application delivery. VMware has optimized application delivery to virtual and physical desktops, and even RDSH and XenApp servers. With VMware App Volumes, IT can instantly deliver applications to virtual desktops (see video below), RDSH servers, and XenApp servers in real-time with lifecycle management.



App Volumes virtualizes above the OS with VMDK or VHD files that attach to a user or virtual desktop via an AppStack. App Volumes has a one to many delivery scheme that helps organizations lower their storage capacity by 30%. Just use one VMDK or VDH file, full of applications, to attach to many users or desktops! IT can benefit from the lower costs of maintaining a non-persistent environment, while delivering a seamless end-user experience across environments. For physical and BYO scenarios, VMware Mirage provides dynamic layering that helps quickly deliver updates to operating systems and applications. Our customers have been able to reduce their device management time by nearly 67% with Mirage.

User Environment Management

Another critical component of WEM is something that we announced at PEX this year – our acquisition of Immidio. Immidio offers a user environment management (UEM) solution. IT can deliver personalization and dynamic policy configuration to end users across any virtual, physical, and cloud-based environment. The Immidio solution simplifies end-user profile management by providing organizations with a simple and scalable solution that requires no additional infrastructure – a huge cost savings compared to other UEM solutions. IT can simply map infrastructure (including networks and printers) and dynamically set policies for end users. For example, map policies according to location, which you can see in the third part of the video below.



With this solution, end users can also enjoy quick access with a personalized and consistent experience across devices and locations. For example, changing personalization settings on apps can persist across devices, as we illustrate in the second part of the video above. The net effect—organizations leveraging Immidio can increase workplace productivity while driving down the cost of acquisition and day-to-day desktop support and operations.

Up to this point, I’ve illustrated how we are able to isolate, provision, and deliver applications, while simplifying management of user’s profiles across different devices and locations. Another component of WEM includes application access. End users should be able to access their apps and desktops through a unified workspace. VMware offers this through our Workspace Portal. With single-sign on and the ability to access all SaaS apps, ThinApps, XenApps, RDSH Apps, and virtual desktops, this is the one stop shop for accessing applications. End users can enjoy personalized access to all of their applications through a secure, unified workspace with a consistent experience across devices and locations.

Application Maintenance and Monitoring

Now that we’ve highlighted the key components of Horizon that make up WEM, let’s take a look at the natural process of app maintenance and monitoring. We simplify app maintenance by making it a repeatable process. Let’s say you have to update a patch on an application like Firefox. You simply update the application via AppStacks or Layers. Or if you need to isolate Firefox, just update it using ThinApp. Then use the delivery mechanism of choice to the preferred platform of choice, and voila, Firefox has been updated and the end-user can consume the app. IT can even proactively monitor app and desktop performance using vRealize Operations, which you can see in the video below. IT can help reduce support calls and provide better end-user experience by remediating based on proactive alerts and in-guest metrics.

 



Using these technologies available through Horizon, you can enable Workspace Environment Management in your environment. Now you can help your organization drive application and end-user management transformation using Horizon. For more information, I encourage you to visit us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, or check out the Mobility section of our hands on labs.

 

 

Workspace Environment Management with Horizon

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Workspace Environment Management with Horizon
Feb 272015
 
By Sachin Sharma, Product Marketing, End-User Computing, VMware A constant theme I hear when talking to customers about managing their virtual, physical, and cloud-hosted environments tends to center around the challenges they face with applications and users. In particular, the questions that customers are looking to solve are ones like how can I simplify management […]]> By Sachin Sharma, Product Marketing, End-User Computing, VMware

A constant theme I hear when talking to customers about managing their virtual, physical, and cloud-hosted environments tends to center around the challenges they face with applications and users. In particular, the questions that customers are looking to solve are ones like how can I simplify management of my 100s of apps throughout their lifecycle, from provisioning, to updating, to dealing with app conflicts? How can I optimize delivery of applications to all the different environments, devices, and users I manage? How can I drive down costs of managing user personas while delivering a consistent experience across devices? And these are just some of the questions I hear. Well, we’ve been working to help tackle these challenges with a complete Workspace Environment Management solution using our Horizon technologies.

What is Workspace Environment Management? It’s an end-to-end approach to application and end-user management across physical, virtual, and cloud-hosted desktop environments. This approach enables IT organizations to effectively isolate and deliver applications in real-time, monitor performance, and map persona and policies to best meet end-user requirements across devices and locations. These capabilities allow IT to simplify producing and delivering applications and user policies, and end-users to consume applications as a service independent of device and location. Bridget Botelho from Tech Target has a complementary explanation in her Q&A with Harry Labana, VP Products for EUC at VMware.

 

 

So, how does VMware fit into this space? By using a variety of technologies available in Horizon, VMware is uniquely positioned to help customers deliver and manage apps and end-users across any environment. These environments can be virtual, physical, and even cloud-hosted. Horizon enables applications to effectively be isolated, delivered, published and monitored in real-time. This in turn helps optimize the way organizations manage workspace environments, along with driving down infrastructure and management costs. Let’s take a look at what this means in the context of the Horizon offering…

App Isolation and Delivery

To begin–using VMware ThinApp, apps can be isolated so as to avoid app conflicts, or running legacy apps on newer operating systems for example. App isolation helps lower TCO by reducing or eliminating the need to install applications when needed. Simply isolate the apps to run independent of the underlying OS.

With Horizon, apps and desktops can be provisioned using a single and secure platform via Horizon RDSH capabilities. This includes published applications and desktops. With our latest release of Horizon, we now offer full RDS Hosted Apps support, Windows Media Multimedia Redirection (MMR), Scanner Redirection, and HTML Access for RDS desktops. These capabilities help streamline management for better user experience across the WAN.

A key component of WEM is application delivery. VMware has optimized application delivery to virtual and physical desktops, and even RDSH and XenApp servers. With VMware App Volumes, IT can instantly deliver applications to virtual desktops (see video below), RDSH servers, and XenApp servers in real-time with lifecycle management.



App Volumes virtualizes above the OS with VMDK or VHD files that attach to a user or virtual desktop via an AppStack. App Volumes has a one to many delivery scheme that helps organizations lower their storage capacity by 30%. Just use one VMDK or VDH file, full of applications, to attach to many users or desktops! IT can benefit from the lower costs of maintaining a non-persistent environment, while delivering a seamless end-user experience across environments. For physical and BYO scenarios, VMware Mirage provides dynamic layering that helps quickly deliver updates to operating systems and applications. Our customers have been able to reduce their device management time by nearly 67% with Mirage.

User Environment Management

Another critical component of WEM is something that we announced at PEX this year – our acquisition of Immidio. Immidio offers a user environment management (UEM) solution. IT can deliver personalization and dynamic policy configuration to end users across any virtual, physical, and cloud-based environment. The Immidio solution simplifies end-user profile management by providing organizations with a simple and scalable solution that requires no additional infrastructure – a huge cost savings compared to other UEM solutions. IT can simply map infrastructure (including networks and printers) and dynamically set policies for end users. For example, map policies according to location, which you can see in the third part of the video below.



With this solution, end users can also enjoy quick access with a personalized and consistent experience across devices and locations. For example, changing personalization settings on apps can persist across devices, as we illustrate in the second part of the video above. The net effect—organizations leveraging Immidio can increase workplace productivity while driving down the cost of acquisition and day-to-day desktop support and operations.

Up to this point, I’ve illustrated how we are able to isolate, provision, and deliver applications, while simplifying management of user’s profiles across different devices and locations. Another component of WEM includes application access. End users should be able to access their apps and desktops through a unified workspace. VMware offers this through our Workspace Portal. With single-sign on and the ability to access all SaaS apps, ThinApps, XenApps, RDSH Apps, and virtual desktops, this is the one stop shop for accessing applications. End users can enjoy personalized access to all of their applications through a secure, unified workspace with a consistent experience across devices and locations.

Application Maintenance and Monitoring

Now that we’ve highlighted the key components of Horizon that make up WEM, let’s take a look at the natural process of app maintenance and monitoring. We simplify app maintenance by making it a repeatable process. Let’s say you have to update a patch on an application like Firefox. You simply update the application via AppStacks or Layers. Or if you need to isolate Firefox, just update it using ThinApp. Then use the delivery mechanism of choice to the preferred platform of choice, and voila, Firefox has been updated and the end-user can consume the app. IT can even proactively monitor app and desktop performance using vRealize Operations, which you can see in the video below. IT can help reduce support calls and provide better end-user experience by remediating based on proactive alerts and in-guest metrics.

 



Using these technologies available through Horizon, you can enable Workspace Environment Management in your environment. Now you can help your organization drive application and end-user management transformation using Horizon. For more information, I encourage you to visit us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, or check out the Mobility section of our hands on labs.

 

 

Relevance of POSIX in the Big Data Era?

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Relevance of POSIX in the Big Data Era?
Feb 272015
 
Let’s start with a thought exercise: imagine your application issues a write() call followed by a read(). What would you expect to get back in the read operation? Here are your options: Always get back the latest update Get back either the latest update or the previous value, but never partial updates Always get back the latest update if the read is issued from within the same session Once the latest value is returned by the read, the subsequent reads will never return the old stale value i.e., monotonic guarantee Bounded staleness i.e., reads issued after a given interval will always see the latest updates And so on… All the options listed above are valid — the correct answer depends on the internal implementation of the storage system– namely, how it implements write buffering, atomicity granularity, data durability, read-write protocol for accessing replicas, ordering of updates, etc. The motivation of this exercise was to illustrate the need for a “semantic contract” between the application developer and the underlying storage system. The contract defines what the application programmer should expect as an outcome of the operation, without necessarily getting exposed to the complex nuts-and-bolts of the storage system. POSIX can be considered [...]]> Let’s start with a thought exercise: imagine your application issues a write() call followed by a read(). What would you expect to get back in the read operation? Here are your options:
  • Always get back the latest update
  • Get back either the latest update or the previous value, but never partial updates
  • Always get back the latest update if the read is issued from within the same session
  • Once the latest value is returned by the read, the subsequent reads will never return the old stale value i.e., monotonic guarantee
  • Bounded staleness i.e., reads issued after a given interval will always see the latest updates
  • And so on…

All the options listed above are valid — the correct answer depends on the internal implementation of the storage system– namely, how it implements write buffering, atomicity granularity, data durability, read-write protocol for accessing replicas, ordering of updates, etc. The motivation of this exercise was to illustrate the need for a “semantic contract” between the application developer and the underlying storage system. The contract defines what the application programmer should expect as an outcome of the operation, without necessarily getting exposed to the complex nuts-and-bolts of the storage system.

POSIXcan be considered as the most well-known, de-facto contract between application developers and the platform. The standard has been around for four decades, and was originally invented to allow interoperability between *nix systems. While POSIX is a fairly broad standard defining both syntax and semantics of the contact, the focus of this blog is on the IO related semantics of POSIX.

At the time when POSIX was defined, the hardware building blocks, enterprise applications, and data-center deployment models were all quite different. For instance, POSIX applications were mostly designed for scale-up (instead of scale-out), and relied on the following storage system semantics for:

  • Strong consistency in tracking the file metadata attributes such as access time, size, etc.
  • Traversing the entire namespace (i.e., directories) hierarchy
  • Guarantee of mutual exclusion of read-write operations
  • Guarantee of strict serializability of concurrent updates

Fast forward to the Big Data Era — applications are being designed ground-up with scale-out, micro-service principles. Traversing the namespace with billions of objects is an exception more than a norm. Similarly, the associated metadata attributes are expected to be eventually consistent, to avoid the performance overhead of synchronization. Similarly, there are different degrees of read-write and write-write serializability based on availability, performance, scaling, and application requirements.

To sum it up, the POSIX world was envisioned to be a one-size-fits-all. The Big Data Era, on the contrary, is dealing with significant diversities in data volume, velocity, and variety. As such, applications need to trade-off their storage contract requirements in lieu of better performance, scaling, availability. There have been numerousblogshighlighting the deficiencies of POSIX in addressing the evolving landscape of applications and storage architectures. There have been unsuccessfulattemptsin the past (especially in the HPC community) to revisit the basic tenants of POSIX IO, and propose new extensions to POSIX.

The objective of this post is not solely to highlight that POSIX is not a silver bullet (hopefully that point is clear by now!). We still have the unanswered question of: how can we create an interoperable semantic contract for Big Data applications to run seamlessly across platforms as well as private/public cloud environments? Today, most Big Data applications (such as Hadoop, Cassandra, MongoDB, etc.) accomplish interoperability by bundling together a scale-out storage layer that runs on local disks/file systems. The sprawl of one-off bundles are not sustainable in the long run w.r.t. maintenance and deployment, and we need a single platform that can instead support a wide variety of semantic contracts.

To address the unanswered question, I would like to propose a different perspective on POSIX — instead of treating POSIX as a one-size-fits-all contract, we treat it as a blueprint for defining contracts. In other words, we essentially extract the different dimensions that POSIX standardizes, and instead of having a single hard-coded semantic behavior, we allow a range of semantic models to be defined for each dimension. In the proposed model, the storage system advertises the supported semantics for each dimension — an application is interoperable with the storage platform, if its minimum required guarantees match those advertised by the storage system across all dimensions.

To illustrate the concept of range semantics, consider the read-write serialization example that was introduced in the beginning of this blog. Leslie Lamport defined a classictaxonomyfor wait-free coherence models. The taxonomy defined three semantic models:

  • Safe registers: A read overlapping a write can return an arbitrary value i.e., non-atomic
  • Regular registers: A read overlapping a write can either return the old value or the new value
  • Atomic registers: The monotonic guarantee that if a read returns a new value, the subsequent read cannot return an older value

So, in the world where POSIX is a blue-print, if the application was implemented assuming a Regular register model, any storage system that advertised Regular or Atomic for read-write serialization would be considered interoperable for this dimension.

Following is the list of key dimensions (not exhaustive) that POSIX IO defines, as well as a few more that are actually missing. The description below uses the term object in a generic fashion for the entities exposed by the storage system. Also, these semantics can be defined differently for sync versus async IO operations.

  • Namespace schema: Defines rules related with naming of the objects as well as the associated hierarchy
  • Object Addressability: Defines the semantics for addressing the update within the object. In the current POSIX model, the addressability is a single flat “stream of bytes,” where the addressing is a tuple of object and offset address. In contrast, a “vector of bytes” or a record-based model is more intuitive for Big Data applications
  • Update Atomicity: Guarantees that the result of an object update are either visible in its entirety or none at all. This dimension also defines the atomicity granularity which could be sector-, block-, object-level, etc.
  • Granularity of Ordering: Defines the granularity at which the storage system will serialize the read and write operations. POSIX actually does not define ordering semantics. There are interesting taxonomyproposalsfor ordering IO operations on a per-object, per-replica, or the entire namespace
  • Read-Write Serialization: Defining the behavior when concurrent read and write operations are issued for the same record. This was covered earlier in the blog.
  • Write-Write Serialization: Defines how concurrent write-write operations are handled. POSIX today defines mutual exclusion semantics. Relaxed alternatives are Last Writer Wins semantics or Versioned updates
  • Separation of Ordering and Durability: This was a proposedextensionto POSIX where the application is notified when the update is buffered, and then separately when the data is actually made persistent on durable media
  • Metadata consistency: Allows explicitly calling out the consistency of system metadata (such as size, access times) that is associated with the data objects. POSIX enforces strong consistency for metadata
  • Transactions: Defines whether the storage system supports ACID-like semantics across multiple storage objects. The transactions can be further specialized into read-only transactions, etc.

To summarize, POSIX IO has been extremely valuable over the last several decades as a contract between the application and storage. POSIX is also relevant for the Big Data era, but the one-size-fits-all is not the most flexible given the diversity of applications and infrastructure models. Instead of trying to standardize on a single semantic model, the community should aim to use POSIX (with extensions) as a blueprint to interoperate in the wild west of non-POSIX systems.

Relevance of POSIX in the Big Data Era?

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Relevance of POSIX in the Big Data Era?
Feb 272015
 
Let’s start with a thought exercise: imagine your application issues a write() call followed by a read(). What would you expect to get back in the read operation? Here are your options: Always get back the latest update Get back either the latest update or the previous value, but never partial updates Always get back the latest update if the read is issued from within the same session Once the latest value is returned by the read, the subsequent reads will never return the old stale value i.e., monotonic guarantee Bounded staleness i.e., reads issued after a given interval will always see the latest updates And so on… All the options listed above are valid — the correct answer depends on the internal implementation of the storage system– namely, how it implements write buffering, atomicity granularity, data durability, read-write protocol for accessing replicas, ordering of updates, etc. The motivation of this exercise was to illustrate the need for a “semantic contract” between the application developer and the underlying storage system. The contract defines what the application programmer should expect as an outcome of the operation, without necessarily getting exposed to the complex nuts-and-bolts of the storage system. POSIX can be considered [...]]> Let’s start with a thought exercise: imagine your application issues a write() call followed by a read(). What would you expect to get back in the read operation? Here are your options:
  • Always get back the latest update
  • Get back either the latest update or the previous value, but never partial updates
  • Always get back the latest update if the read is issued from within the same session
  • Once the latest value is returned by the read, the subsequent reads will never return the old stale value i.e., monotonic guarantee
  • Bounded staleness i.e., reads issued after a given interval will always see the latest updates
  • And so on…

All the options listed above are valid — the correct answer depends on the internal implementation of the storage system– namely, how it implements write buffering, atomicity granularity, data durability, read-write protocol for accessing replicas, ordering of updates, etc. The motivation of this exercise was to illustrate the need for a “semantic contract” between the application developer and the underlying storage system. The contract defines what the application programmer should expect as an outcome of the operation, without necessarily getting exposed to the complex nuts-and-bolts of the storage system.

POSIXcan be considered as the most well-known, de-facto contract between application developers and the platform. The standard has been around for four decades, and was originally invented to allow interoperability between *nix systems. While POSIX is a fairly broad standard defining both syntax and semantics of the contact, the focus of this blog is on the IO related semantics of POSIX.

At the time when POSIX was defined, the hardware building blocks, enterprise applications, and data-center deployment models were all quite different. For instance, POSIX applications were mostly designed for scale-up (instead of scale-out), and relied on the following storage system semantics for:

  • Strong consistency in tracking the file metadata attributes such as access time, size, etc.
  • Traversing the entire namespace (i.e., directories) hierarchy
  • Guarantee of mutual exclusion of read-write operations
  • Guarantee of strict serializability of concurrent updates

Fast forward to the Big Data Era — applications are being designed ground-up with scale-out, micro-service principles. Traversing the namespace with billions of objects is an exception more than a norm. Similarly, the associated metadata attributes are expected to be eventually consistent, to avoid the performance overhead of synchronization. Similarly, there are different degrees of read-write and write-write serializability based on availability, performance, scaling, and application requirements.

To sum it up, the POSIX world was envisioned to be a one-size-fits-all. The Big Data Era, on the contrary, is dealing with significant diversities in data volume, velocity, and variety. As such, applications need to trade-off their storage contract requirements in lieu of better performance, scaling, availability. There have been numerousblogshighlighting the deficiencies of POSIX in addressing the evolving landscape of applications and storage architectures. There have been unsuccessfulattemptsin the past (especially in the HPC community) to revisit the basic tenants of POSIX IO, and propose new extensions to POSIX.

The objective of this post is not solely to highlight that POSIX is not a silver bullet (hopefully that point is clear by now!). We still have the unanswered question of: how can we create an interoperable semantic contract for Big Data applications to run seamlessly across platforms as well as private/public cloud environments? Today, most Big Data applications (such as Hadoop, Cassandra, MongoDB, etc.) accomplish interoperability by bundling together a scale-out storage layer that runs on local disks/file systems. The sprawl of one-off bundles are not sustainable in the long run w.r.t. maintenance and deployment, and we need a single platform that can instead support a wide variety of semantic contracts.

To address the unanswered question, I would like to propose a different perspective on POSIX — instead of treating POSIX as a one-size-fits-all contract, we treat it as a blueprint for defining contracts. In other words, we essentially extract the different dimensions that POSIX standardizes, and instead of having a single hard-coded semantic behavior, we allow a range of semantic models to be defined for each dimension. In the proposed model, the storage system advertises the supported semantics for each dimension — an application is interoperable with the storage platform, if its minimum required guarantees match those advertised by the storage system across all dimensions.

To illustrate the concept of range semantics, consider the read-write serialization example that was introduced in the beginning of this blog. Leslie Lamport defined a classictaxonomyfor wait-free coherence models. The taxonomy defined three semantic models:

  • Safe registers: A read overlapping a write can return an arbitrary value i.e., non-atomic
  • Regular registers: A read overlapping a write can either return the old value or the new value
  • Atomic registers: The monotonic guarantee that if a read returns a new value, the subsequent read cannot return an older value

So, in the world where POSIX is a blue-print, if the application was implemented assuming a Regular register model, any storage system that advertised Regular or Atomic for read-write serialization would be considered interoperable for this dimension.

Following is the list of key dimensions (not exhaustive) that POSIX IO defines, as well as a few more that are actually missing. The description below uses the term object in a generic fashion for the entities exposed by the storage system. Also, these semantics can be defined differently for sync versus async IO operations.

  • Namespace schema: Defines rules related with naming of the objects as well as the associated hierarchy
  • Object Addressability: Defines the semantics for addressing the update within the object. In the current POSIX model, the addressability is a single flat “stream of bytes,” where the addressing is a tuple of object and offset address. In contrast, a “vector of bytes” or a record-based model is more intuitive for Big Data applications
  • Update Atomicity: Guarantees that the result of an object update are either visible in its entirety or none at all. This dimension also defines the atomicity granularity which could be sector-, block-, object-level, etc.
  • Granularity of Ordering: Defines the granularity at which the storage system will serialize the read and write operations. POSIX actually does not define ordering semantics. There are interesting taxonomyproposalsfor ordering IO operations on a per-object, per-replica, or the entire namespace
  • Read-Write Serialization: Defining the behavior when concurrent read and write operations are issued for the same record. This was covered earlier in the blog.
  • Write-Write Serialization: Defines how concurrent write-write operations are handled. POSIX today defines mutual exclusion semantics. Relaxed alternatives are Last Writer Wins semantics or Versioned updates
  • Separation of Ordering and Durability: This was a proposedextensionto POSIX where the application is notified when the update is buffered, and then separately when the data is actually made persistent on durable media
  • Metadata consistency: Allows explicitly calling out the consistency of system metadata (such as size, access times) that is associated with the data objects. POSIX enforces strong consistency for metadata
  • Transactions: Defines whether the storage system supports ACID-like semantics across multiple storage objects. The transactions can be further specialized into read-only transactions, etc.

To summarize, POSIX IO has been extremely valuable over the last several decades as a contract between the application and storage. POSIX is also relevant for the Big Data era, but the one-size-fits-all is not the most flexible given the diversity of applications and infrastructure models. Instead of trying to standardize on a single semantic model, the community should aim to use POSIX (with extensions) as a blueprint to interoperate in the wild west of non-POSIX systems.

Lenovo’s Acquisition of IBM x86 and VMware

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Lenovo’s Acquisition of IBM x86 and VMware
Feb 272015
 

With Lenovo’s acquisition of the IBM x86 server portfolio effective January 1, 2015, we now have the opportunity to deliver a wider scope of joint solutions to our customers. Learn more.

Lenovo’s Acquisition of IBM x86 and VMware

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Lenovo’s Acquisition of IBM x86 and VMware
Feb 272015
 

With Lenovo’s acquisition of the IBM x86 server portfolio effective January 1, 2015, we now have the opportunity to deliver a wider scope of joint solutions to our customers. Learn more.