When to Engage Your Organization in Their Cloud Journey

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für When to Engage Your Organization in Their Cloud Journey
Apr 302015
 
By Yohanna Emkies The most common question I hear from my customers is: “What’s going to happen to me (read: my organization) if we introduce the cloud?” Closely followed by: “How are we going begin the planning process…?” These are fair questions, which have to be discussed and worked out. A question that is often […]]> By Yohanna Emkies

The most common question I hear from my customers is: “What’s going to happen to me (read: my organization) if we introduce the cloud?” Closely followed by:

“How are we going begin the planning process…?” These are fair questions, which have to be discussed and worked out.

A question that is often underestimated, although it’s no less important than “what” and the “how” is “when.” When is the right time to tackle operational readiness and organizational questions?

I notice two types of customers when it comes to addressing operational and organizational-related topics. Many simply omit or keep postponing the subject, until they are in the midst of cloud technical go-lives. At some point they realize that they need to cover a number of basics in order to move on and are forced to rely on improvisation. I call them the “late awakeners.”

Others—“early birds” keen to plan for the change—will come up with good questions very early on, but expect all answers to be concrete, before they even start their cloud journey. Here are my observations on each type:

1. Let’s start with the late awakeners.
Quite naturally, the customers I’m working with tend to focus on the technical aspects of the software-defined data center (SDDC), deploying all their resources, putting all the other things on hold, working hard for the technical go-live to succeed, until…

“Hold on a minute, who will take care of the operational tasks once the service is deployed? What is the incident management process? How are we going to measure our service levels? What if adoption is too rapid? And what if we don’t get enough adoption?”

In such cases, critical questions are raised very late in the process, when resources are already under pressure from heavy workloads and increasing uncertainty. These customers end up calling for our support urgently but at the same time find themselves unable to free up resources and attention to address the transformation. And when they do, they fail to look at the big picture, getting caught up in very short-term questions instead of defining services or processes properly.

Doing a first tour in these organizations and mapping the gaps, we may discover entire subjects, which have been left aside, because they are too complex to be addressed on the fly. But even worse, some subjects have already been treated because they were critical… but not treated consciously nor fully. The teams may feel that they don’t have time for these questions, think that it’s taking focus from the “important stuff,” but in reality that’s mostly because they are not aware that they are ALREADY spending a lot of time on these same questions, except they don’t focus their effort on it.

That results not only in poor awareness and maturity at day 1, but also in a low capacity to grow this maturity over time because no framework has been put in place.

Putting things back on track may eventually take more time and focus than if they had been addressed properly in the first place. But it is still feasible.

Clearly, it is an IT senior manager’s role to provide strategic direction, while project managers must include these important work streams in their planning from the start. Ultimately, it’s all part of one holistic project.

2. The early birds are also a tough catch.
From accompanying many organizations in different types of transformations, I cannot advocate loudly enough the need to encourage planning and designing before doing. Being mature in terms of the “what” before running to the “how” is undoubtedly the right approach.

A key lesson learnt is that in order to reorganize successfully for the cloud you have to accept some level of uncertainty while you are making your journey.

Some organizations get stuck upfront with one recurring question: “What will our future organization look like?” Relax.

First no pre-set organization design, even roughly customized to your needs, should be taken for granted. Secondly, no design—even accurate—will ever bring the move about. It’s the people that support the organization who are the critical success factor.

Don’t get me wrong, giving insight, best practices, and direction will definitely help the management in envisioning the future organization, which is essential, but at the same time, an organization is a lively thing by definition. There is also a psychological impact. When you start raising words like “people” and “organization,” concern and fear about change come with.

Sometimes it is even trickier because some organizations are already—or still—in the midst of other transformations started a few years back and lingering. In that case, the impression of “yet another change” may be perceived negatively by the core team and may put them in a situation of stress and stop them from moving forward. What if your team has just finished redesigning and implementing incident management processes, only to realize that they have to do it again to adapt to the cloud?

It will take time for the organization to mature. Embracing the cloud is a big change, but no drastic overnight revolution will take you there. Moving to the cloud is not “yet another re-org” but an ongoing, spreading move, which relies on existing assets, and it’s here to last.

Your organization will evolve as you grow, your skills will improve as your service portfolio and cloud adoption increases. And this will happen organically as long as you put the right foundations in place: the right people, the right processes, the right metrics…and the right mindset.

The right balance to the “when” is somewhere in between the two behaviors of late awakeners and early adopters. Here are some of the most important best practices that I share with my customers:

  1. Gain and maintain the full commitment of senior management sponsors who will support your vision and guarantee focus all along the journey.
  2. Plan your effort and get help: dealing with operational readiness and with technical readiness should be one holistic project, and for the most part, it involves the same people. The project has to integrate both streams together from the start and wisely split effort among the teams to avoid bottlenecks, rework, and wastage.
  3. Opt for an iterative approach: be strategic and pragmatic. Designing as much as you can while you start implementing your cloud, and then refining as you go, will provide a more agile approach and guarantee you reach your goals more efficiently.
  4. Practice full awareness: create a common language on the project, hit important communication milestones, and reward intermediary achievements, so people feel they contribute and see the progress. It is key that your cloud project will be seen positively in the organization and that the people involved in it convey a certain positive image.
  5. Engage your people, engage your people, and engage your people.

As is often said, timing is everything. When dealing with people and their capacity to change, it’s even more critical to find a balance between building momentum and keeping the distance. Your teams will equally need to embrace the vision, feel the success, and at some point also breathe…and when you empower them efficiently across the process you will have the best configuration for success.

=====
Yohanna Emkies is an operations architect in the VMware Operations Transformation Services global practice and is based in Tel Aviv, Israel.

When to Engage Your Organization in Their Cloud Journey

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für When to Engage Your Organization in Their Cloud Journey
Apr 302015
 
By Yohanna Emkies The most common question I hear from my customers is: “What’s going to happen to me (read: my organization) if we introduce the cloud?” Closely followed by: “How are we going begin the planning process…?” These are fair questions, which have to be discussed and worked out. A question that is often […]]> By Yohanna Emkies

The most common question I hear from my customers is: “What’s going to happen to me (read: my organization) if we introduce the cloud?” Closely followed by:

“How are we going begin the planning process…?” These are fair questions, which have to be discussed and worked out.

A question that is often underestimated, although it’s no less important than “what” and the “how” is “when.” When is the right time to tackle operational readiness and organizational questions?

I notice two types of customers when it comes to addressing operational and organizational-related topics. Many simply omit or keep postponing the subject, until they are in the midst of cloud technical go-lives. At some point they realize that they need to cover a number of basics in order to move on and are forced to rely on improvisation. I call them the “late awakeners.”

Others—“early birds” keen to plan for the change—will come up with good questions very early on, but expect all answers to be concrete, before they even start their cloud journey. Here are my observations on each type:

1. Let’s start with the late awakeners.
Quite naturally, the customers I’m working with tend to focus on the technical aspects of the software-defined data center (SDDC), deploying all their resources, putting all the other things on hold, working hard for the technical go-live to succeed, until…

“Hold on a minute, who will take care of the operational tasks once the service is deployed? What is the incident management process? How are we going to measure our service levels? What if adoption is too rapid? And what if we don’t get enough adoption?”

In such cases, critical questions are raised very late in the process, when resources are already under pressure from heavy workloads and increasing uncertainty. These customers end up calling for our support urgently but at the same time find themselves unable to free up resources and attention to address the transformation. And when they do, they fail to look at the big picture, getting caught up in very short-term questions instead of defining services or processes properly.

Doing a first tour in these organizations and mapping the gaps, we may discover entire subjects, which have been left aside, because they are too complex to be addressed on the fly. But even worse, some subjects have already been treated because they were critical… but not treated consciously nor fully. The teams may feel that they don’t have time for these questions, think that it’s taking focus from the “important stuff,” but in reality that’s mostly because they are not aware that they are ALREADY spending a lot of time on these same questions, except they don’t focus their effort on it.

That results not only in poor awareness and maturity at day 1, but also in a low capacity to grow this maturity over time because no framework has been put in place.

Putting things back on track may eventually take more time and focus than if they had been addressed properly in the first place. But it is still feasible.

Clearly, it is an IT senior manager’s role to provide strategic direction, while project managers must include these important work streams in their planning from the start. Ultimately, it’s all part of one holistic project.

2. The early birds are also a tough catch.
From accompanying many organizations in different types of transformations, I cannot advocate loudly enough the need to encourage planning and designing before doing. Being mature in terms of the “what” before running to the “how” is undoubtedly the right approach.

A key lesson learnt is that in order to reorganize successfully for the cloud you have to accept some level of uncertainty while you are making your journey.

Some organizations get stuck upfront with one recurring question: “What will our future organization look like?” Relax.

First no pre-set organization design, even roughly customized to your needs, should be taken for granted. Secondly, no design—even accurate—will ever bring the move about. It’s the people that support the organization who are the critical success factor.

Don’t get me wrong, giving insight, best practices, and direction will definitely help the management in envisioning the future organization, which is essential, but at the same time, an organization is a lively thing by definition. There is also a psychological impact. When you start raising words like “people” and “organization,” concern and fear about change come with.

Sometimes it is even trickier because some organizations are already—or still—in the midst of other transformations started a few years back and lingering. In that case, the impression of “yet another change” may be perceived negatively by the core team and may put them in a situation of stress and stop them from moving forward. What if your team has just finished redesigning and implementing incident management processes, only to realize that they have to do it again to adapt to the cloud?

It will take time for the organization to mature. Embracing the cloud is a big change, but no drastic overnight revolution will take you there. Moving to the cloud is not “yet another re-org” but an ongoing, spreading move, which relies on existing assets, and it’s here to last.

Your organization will evolve as you grow, your skills will improve as your service portfolio and cloud adoption increases. And this will happen organically as long as you put the right foundations in place: the right people, the right processes, the right metrics…and the right mindset.

The right balance to the “when” is somewhere in between the two behaviors of late awakeners and early adopters. Here are some of the most important best practices that I share with my customers:

  1. Gain and maintain the full commitment of senior management sponsors who will support your vision and guarantee focus all along the journey.
  2. Plan your effort and get help: dealing with operational readiness and with technical readiness should be one holistic project, and for the most part, it involves the same people. The project has to integrate both streams together from the start and wisely split effort among the teams to avoid bottlenecks, rework, and wastage.
  3. Opt for an iterative approach: be strategic and pragmatic. Designing as much as you can while you start implementing your cloud, and then refining as you go, will provide a more agile approach and guarantee you reach your goals more efficiently.
  4. Practice full awareness: create a common language on the project, hit important communication milestones, and reward intermediary achievements, so people feel they contribute and see the progress. It is key that your cloud project will be seen positively in the organization and that the people involved in it convey a certain positive image.
  5. Engage your people, engage your people, and engage your people.

As is often said, timing is everything. When dealing with people and their capacity to change, it’s even more critical to find a balance between building momentum and keeping the distance. Your teams will equally need to embrace the vision, feel the success, and at some point also breathe…and when you empower them efficiently across the process you will have the best configuration for success.

=====
Yohanna Emkies is an operations architect in the VMware Operations Transformation Services global practice and is based in Tel Aviv, Israel.

Tres cosas que probablemente te hayas perdido del VMware OTF

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Tres cosas que probablemente te hayas perdido del VMware OTF
Apr 302015
 

El VMware Online Technology Forum fue una oportunidad para que conocieras de forma cercana las últimas novedades de VMware y pudieras participar en las charlas con los expertos y portavoces. Aquí tienes las tres cosas más destacadas que consideramos que merece la pena que vuelvas a visitar.

-El CTO de las oficinas de VMware, Duncan Epping, mostró las novedades de vSphere 6.0. La sesión tuvo una muy buena acogida, así que si no tienes tiempo para explorar muchas sesiones, esta debería ser una de las que veas. Duncan entró en profundidad en los cambios y mejoras en comparación con la versión 5.5, destacando como la versión 6.0 aborda la escalabilidad de la nube y las aplicaciones críticas del negocio. Para acceder a esta sesión y a las charlas relacionadas, visita el Hall del Online Technology Forum, y selecciona “vSphere 6, the Foundation for the Hybrid Cloud” (“vSphere 6, los cimientos de la nube híbrida”). Puedes elegir esta y otras sesiones en las que estés interesado, y descargártelas en tu equipo para verlo offline en cualquier punto.

- Hiperconvergencia con EVO: RAIL. Hay varios métodos para conseguir llegar hacia el centro de datos definido por software, entre ellos el tradicional “construye tu propia” infraestructura convergente (Think VCE vBlock, Fujitsu vShape, etc.) y ahora también la infraestructura hiperconvergente de VMware EVO: RAIL. Esta sesión ofrece en profundidad una mirada a EVO: RAIL, mostrando como transforma la experiencia end-to-end del usuario, desde la adquisición inicial y su despliegue, hasta el mantenimiento y el soporte. También muestra cómo EVO: RAIL aborda desafíos vitales para las empresas, incluyendo la libertad de elección, flexibilidad, mantenimiento, facilidad de uso y costes.

- Laboratorios. Estos son la forma más rápida y fácil para comprobar de primera mano las capacidades técnicas de los productos de VMware. No requieren instalar nada en tu escritorio y son completamente gratis. Con el Online Technology Forum, puedes también acceder a los expertos y preguntarles cualquier duda que tengas. Mira más abajo los laboratorios disponibles:

-Lo nuevo de vSphere

-Lo nuevo de Virtual SAN

-Cloud Mangement con vRealize operations

-Horizon 6 (con View) de la A a la Z

-Introducción a EVO: RAIL

Asegúrate de visitar la página del evento para aprovechar todo este contenido, revisa la agenda para ver un resumen completo de lo que hay disponible

Tres cosas que probablemente te hayas perdido del VMware OTF

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Tres cosas que probablemente te hayas perdido del VMware OTF
Apr 302015
 

El VMware Online Technology Forum fue una oportunidad para que conocieras de forma cercana las últimas novedades de VMware y pudieras participar en las charlas con los expertos y portavoces. Aquí tienes las tres cosas más destacadas que consideramos que merece la pena que vuelvas a visitar.

-El CTO de las oficinas de VMware, Duncan Epping, mostró las novedades de vSphere 6.0. La sesión tuvo una muy buena acogida, así que si no tienes tiempo para explorar muchas sesiones, esta debería ser una de las que veas. Duncan entró en profundidad en los cambios y mejoras en comparación con la versión 5.5, destacando como la versión 6.0 aborda la escalabilidad de la nube y las aplicaciones críticas del negocio. Para acceder a esta sesión y a las charlas relacionadas, visita el Hall del Online Technology Forum, y selecciona “vSphere 6, the Foundation for the Hybrid Cloud” (“vSphere 6, los cimientos de la nube híbrida”). Puedes elegir esta y otras sesiones en las que estés interesado, y descargártelas en tu equipo para verlo offline en cualquier punto.

- Hiperconvergencia con EVO: RAIL. Hay varios métodos para conseguir llegar hacia el centro de datos definido por software, entre ellos el tradicional “construye tu propia” infraestructura convergente (Think VCE vBlock, Fujitsu vShape, etc.) y ahora también la infraestructura hiperconvergente de VMware EVO: RAIL. Esta sesión ofrece en profundidad una mirada a EVO: RAIL, mostrando como transforma la experiencia end-to-end del usuario, desde la adquisición inicial y su despliegue, hasta el mantenimiento y el soporte. También muestra cómo EVO: RAIL aborda desafíos vitales para las empresas, incluyendo la libertad de elección, flexibilidad, mantenimiento, facilidad de uso y costes.

- Laboratorios. Estos son la forma más rápida y fácil para comprobar de primera mano las capacidades técnicas de los productos de VMware. No requieren instalar nada en tu escritorio y son completamente gratis. Con el Online Technology Forum, puedes también acceder a los expertos y preguntarles cualquier duda que tengas. Mira más abajo los laboratorios disponibles:

-Lo nuevo de vSphere

-Lo nuevo de Virtual SAN

-Cloud Mangement con vRealize operations

-Horizon 6 (con View) de la A a la Z

-Introducción a EVO: RAIL

Asegúrate de visitar la página del evento para aprovechar todo este contenido, revisa la agenda para ver un resumen completo de lo que hay disponible

New Pricing & New Videos for VMware Learning Zone

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für New Pricing & New Videos for VMware Learning Zone
Apr 302015
 

There’s a new way to spread the word about your VMware certification – sharing it on LinkedIn.

Just log into to the Portal for your certification

and then click on the “Add to Profile” button for your certification.

You’ll be taken to LinkedIn and given the option to add your certification to your profile

New Pricing & New Videos for VMware Learning Zone

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für New Pricing & New Videos for VMware Learning Zone
Apr 302015
 

There’s a new way to spread the word about your VMware certification – sharing it on LinkedIn.

Just log into to the Portal for your certification

and then click on the “Add to Profile” button for your certification.

You’ll be taken to LinkedIn and given the option to add your certification to your profile

VMware vRealize Operations 6 Claims Best of Interop Award 2015

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für VMware vRealize Operations 6 Claims Best of Interop Award 2015
Apr 302015
 
By Sajai Krishnan, vice president of product marketing, Cloud Management Business Unit I’m happy to announce that vRealize Operations 6 won the Best of Interop Award 2015 for Performance/Management/Monitoring category this week at Interop in Las Vegas. Four years after securing its initial best of Interop award in the Cloud Computing and Virtualization category, vRealize […]]> http://blogs.vmware.com/tribalknowledge/2015/04/vmware-vrealize-operations-6-claims-best-interop-award-2015.html/feed 0 Explain It Like I’m Four: Enterprise Mobility Management (EMM) http://blogs.vmware.com/tribalknowledge/2015/04/explain-like-im-four-enterprise-mobility-management-emm.html?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=explain-like-im-four-enterprise-mobility-management-emm http://blogs.vmware.com/tribalknowledge/2015/04/explain-like-im-four-enterprise-mobility-management-emm.html#comments Mon, 27 Apr 2015 16:03:05 +0000

VMware vRealize Operations 6 Claims Best of Interop Award 2015

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für VMware vRealize Operations 6 Claims Best of Interop Award 2015
Apr 302015
 
By Sajai Krishnan, vice president of product marketing, Cloud Management Business Unit I’m happy to announce that vRealize Operations 6 won the Best of Interop Award 2015 for Performance/Management/Monitoring category this week at Interop in Las Vegas. Four years after securing its initial best of Interop award in the Cloud Computing and Virtualization category, vRealize […]]> http://blogs.vmware.com/tribalknowledge/2015/04/vmware-vrealize-operations-6-claims-best-interop-award-2015.html/feed 0 Explain It Like I’m Four: Enterprise Mobility Management (EMM) http://blogs.vmware.com/tribalknowledge/2015/04/explain-like-im-four-enterprise-mobility-management-emm.html?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=explain-like-im-four-enterprise-mobility-management-emm http://blogs.vmware.com/tribalknowledge/2015/04/explain-like-im-four-enterprise-mobility-management-emm.html#comments Mon, 27 Apr 2015 16:03:05 +0000

Good Gigs – My Service Learning Trek with the VMware Foundation

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Good Gigs – My Service Learning Trek with the VMware Foundation
Apr 302015
 
In software development, we measure our work by milestones. The same could be true for measuring your life. If I consider the landmark events in my life, the list of my most rewarding days includes my graduation, my wedding, the birth of my child, and the day I spent at Hua Giang orphanage in Vietnam. […]]> In software development, we measure our work by milestones. The same could be true for measuring your life. If I consider the landmark events in my life, the list of my most rewarding days includes my graduation, my wedding, the birth of my child, and the day I spent at Hua Giang orphanage in Vietnam.

Last year, I was in Vietnamas part of the VMware FoundationGood Gigs program. Through immersing ourselves in the service of others, this program gives people a unique opportunity to not only give back, but to also learn and grow. We collaborated with educators to develop programming curriculum for children attending digital literacy classes in orphanages. The Trek was physically challenging and emotionally insightful. After a week of working in-country and visiting orphanages to prepare teachers to deliver the lessons, our trip ended with an afternoon of playing with the children in the courtyard of Hua Giang. When a little girl asked me if I would be back to play tomorrow, my heart ached. Her question lingered.

Six months later, I accepted the opportunity to lead the next Good Gigs Trek to Cambodia. I felt honored, but apprehensive. The trek to Vietnam had opened my eyes to the power of Service Learning, in contributing to my growth. Now as the lead, my challenge would be to go beyond myself and to ensure the success of the mission and the experience for other trekkers as we deployed a digital literacy curriculum. I also carried with me that burning question from the young girl. What are the ripple effects of our actions?

Arriving in Cambodia, my eyes were open to the smells and sounds of the country. But my view had shifted, I was no longer a tourist. I realized that my presence had impact to the community and I cautiously watched my every step. A village tour was no longer a visit to the countryside. A walk through the market was immersing ourselves in the community. I considered the weight of the footprint we left and wondered if our presence might have been an intrusion. When we asked a father if he sends his children to school, he said, “Education doesn’t make the rice grow.”

Doubt can often be a spiral that leads you down, silences your voice, and paralyzes your actions. On the Trek in Cambodia, I thought about who I want to be. Do I want to be a person who is so fearful that they do not act? I did not. When we go out into the world, of course we have impact. Positive and negative. But if the action we take comes with good intentions, then the light of our actions pushes back the boundaries of darkness. The mistake would be not to act because we are fearful of taking the wrong step. The Good Gigs program doesn’t shy away from tough questions, difficult feelings, or the pains of personal and professional growth. It welcomes them and creates a space for you to explore them even if it puts you outside of your comfort zone. Because that’s where interesting happens. That’s where the growth is.

Through Good Gigs, I learned a great deal about education, economic development, and what it truly means to be in service of others. The result of the program is work that helps charitable organizations, but the outcome is taking learnings from the experience and translating them into growth. These experiences have definitely shaped who I am and what kind of person I want to be. Working at VMware has been professionally rewarding and I am proud of the innovative work that I have been a part of. I am most proud of working with the VMware Foundation and being part of the Good Gigs program. It has been the highlight of my career and will always be a landmark in my life.

Visit the VMware Foundation Site to learn more about Citizen Philanthropy at VMware.

Visit the VMware Careers Site to learn more about life at VMware.

Learn more about the workplace culture at VMware, see pics of our offices, talk to recruiters, and get real time job openings by following us on our social pages:

http://pinterest.com/lifeatvmware/

http://facebook.com/vmwarecareers

http://twitter.com/vmwarecareers

http://instagram.com/vmwarecareers

LinkedIn Group “VMware Careers”

 

Good Gigs – My Service Learning Trek with the VMware Foundation

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Good Gigs – My Service Learning Trek with the VMware Foundation
Apr 302015
 
In software development, we measure our work by milestones. The same could be true for measuring your life. If I consider the landmark events in my life, the list of my most rewarding days includes my graduation, my wedding, the birth of my child, and the day I spent at Hua Giang orphanage in Vietnam. […]]> In software development, we measure our work by milestones. The same could be true for measuring your life. If I consider the landmark events in my life, the list of my most rewarding days includes my graduation, my wedding, the birth of my child, and the day I spent at Hua Giang orphanage in Vietnam.

Last year, I was in Vietnamas part of the VMware FoundationGood Gigs program. Through immersing ourselves in the service of others, this program gives people a unique opportunity to not only give back, but to also learn and grow. We collaborated with educators to develop programming curriculum for children attending digital literacy classes in orphanages. The Trek was physically challenging and emotionally insightful. After a week of working in-country and visiting orphanages to prepare teachers to deliver the lessons, our trip ended with an afternoon of playing with the children in the courtyard of Hua Giang. When a little girl asked me if I would be back to play tomorrow, my heart ached. Her question lingered.

Six months later, I accepted the opportunity to lead the next Good Gigs Trek to Cambodia. I felt honored, but apprehensive. The trek to Vietnam had opened my eyes to the power of Service Learning, in contributing to my growth. Now as the lead, my challenge would be to go beyond myself and to ensure the success of the mission and the experience for other trekkers as we deployed a digital literacy curriculum. I also carried with me that burning question from the young girl. What are the ripple effects of our actions?

Arriving in Cambodia, my eyes were open to the smells and sounds of the country. But my view had shifted, I was no longer a tourist. I realized that my presence had impact to the community and I cautiously watched my every step. A village tour was no longer a visit to the countryside. A walk through the market was immersing ourselves in the community. I considered the weight of the footprint we left and wondered if our presence might have been an intrusion. When we asked a father if he sends his children to school, he said, “Education doesn’t make the rice grow.”

Doubt can often be a spiral that leads you down, silences your voice, and paralyzes your actions. On the Trek in Cambodia, I thought about who I want to be. Do I want to be a person who is so fearful that they do not act? I did not. When we go out into the world, of course we have impact. Positive and negative. But if the action we take comes with good intentions, then the light of our actions pushes back the boundaries of darkness. The mistake would be not to act because we are fearful of taking the wrong step. The Good Gigs program doesn’t shy away from tough questions, difficult feelings, or the pains of personal and professional growth. It welcomes them and creates a space for you to explore them even if it puts you outside of your comfort zone. Because that’s where interesting happens. That’s where the growth is.

Through Good Gigs, I learned a great deal about education, economic development, and what it truly means to be in service of others. The result of the program is work that helps charitable organizations, but the outcome is taking learnings from the experience and translating them into growth. These experiences have definitely shaped who I am and what kind of person I want to be. Working at VMware has been professionally rewarding and I am proud of the innovative work that I have been a part of. I am most proud of working with the VMware Foundation and being part of the Good Gigs program. It has been the highlight of my career and will always be a landmark in my life.

Visit the VMware Foundation Site to learn more about Citizen Philanthropy at VMware.

Visit the VMware Careers Site to learn more about life at VMware.

Learn more about the workplace culture at VMware, see pics of our offices, talk to recruiters, and get real time job openings by following us on our social pages:

http://pinterest.com/lifeatvmware/

http://facebook.com/vmwarecareers

http://twitter.com/vmwarecareers

http://instagram.com/vmwarecareers

LinkedIn Group “VMware Careers”

 

Apr 302015
 
Recently I was asked by the vBrownbag community to present on vSphere 6 security. vBrownbag is a community-lead podcast series that features online webinars covering various Virtualization and VMware Certification topics, all led by members of the community. It’s an outstanding resource if you are looking to achieve certification or are just in the mood […]]> Recently I was asked by the vBrownbag community to present on vSphere 6 security. vBrownbag is a community-lead podcast series that features online webinars covering various Virtualization and VMware Certification topics, all led by members of the community. It’s an outstanding resource if you are looking to achieve certification or are just in the mood to learn. Read on to see how this webinar went and view for yourself.

What’s really great is that these types of discussions are becoming more and more frequent. I attribute that to VMware’s virtual infrastructure underpinning SO many businesses that the security teams are putting pressure on the IT teams to “make sure it’s secure”. Now, for some of you, you may ask…

Is vSphere security even a popular topic?

The answer is most definitely “YES!” This was made abundantly clear to me last year at VMworld when I asked the ~500 people in my security session some questions. Now, the first clue here is that there were ~500 people in a vSphere security session at VMworld! Holy cow! If I had done that session in 2009 I would have been lucky to pull in 30 attendees!

The first question I asked was “How many here are security professionals who’s main job is IT security?” I’ll guess about 15-30 hands went up. I then asked “How many here are IT/Virtualization professionals who are here because the security guy is on them about securing the virtual infrastructure?”

Every…other…hand went up. Now, I had a pretty good guess that was going to be the answer. But what I think it showed to everyone in the audience is that they are not alone and that security of the virtual infrastructure has finally reached critical mass.

For those of you with access to past VMworld content, the session was INF2336

The vBrownbag Webinar

So, with that in mind, I did the vBrownbag and I had a blast! We discussed the changes in the vSphere Hardening Guide for 6.0 (and showed a sneak peek of some seriously cool PowerCLI stuff!) and then went into some of the updates that have been made in the release. It covers the gamut from easier certificate management to automation of some settings that used to require hand-editing.

You can see in the video below that also we got LOTS of questions. And I got a bunch of questions afterwards via email and Twitter.

Participate!

If you are one of those IT folks who owns the virtual infrastructure and you’re looking to upgrade to vSphere 6 and your IT Security colleagues are challenging you to secure it, this presentation will help. I also encourage you to check out all the other vBrownbag content and even better, contribute your own! Be a part of the community. We’re all in this together and there’s NO shortage of community members that are here to help.

You can find the vBrownbag home page here and the webinar I did here.

Let me know if you have feedback. You can reach me on Twitter as @vspheresecurity or @mikefoley or you can send me email to mfoley at vmware dot com. If there’s a topic you want covered on vSphere security, send it in!

thanks,

mike

Apr 302015
 
Recently I was asked by the vBrownbag community to present on vSphere 6 security. vBrownbag is a community-lead podcast series that features online webinars covering various Virtualization and VMware Certification topics, all led by members of the community. It’s an outstanding resource if you are looking to achieve certification or are just in the mood […]]> Recently I was asked by the vBrownbag community to present on vSphere 6 security. vBrownbag is a community-lead podcast series that features online webinars covering various Virtualization and VMware Certification topics, all led by members of the community. It’s an outstanding resource if you are looking to achieve certification or are just in the mood to learn. Read on to see how this webinar went and view for yourself.

What’s really great is that these types of discussions are becoming more and more frequent. I attribute that to VMware’s virtual infrastructure underpinning SO many businesses that the security teams are putting pressure on the IT teams to “make sure it’s secure”. Now, for some of you, you may ask…

Is vSphere security even a popular topic?

The answer is most definitely “YES!” This was made abundantly clear to me last year at VMworld when I asked the ~500 people in my security session some questions. Now, the first clue here is that there were ~500 people in a vSphere security session at VMworld! Holy cow! If I had done that session in 2009 I would have been lucky to pull in 30 attendees!

The first question I asked was “How many here are security professionals who’s main job is IT security?” I’ll guess about 15-30 hands went up. I then asked “How many here are IT/Virtualization professionals who are here because the security guy is on them about securing the virtual infrastructure?”

Every…other…hand went up. Now, I had a pretty good guess that was going to be the answer. But what I think it showed to everyone in the audience is that they are not alone and that security of the virtual infrastructure has finally reached critical mass.

For those of you with access to past VMworld content, the session was INF2336

The vBrownbag Webinar

So, with that in mind, I did the vBrownbag and I had a blast! We discussed the changes in the vSphere Hardening Guide for 6.0 (and showed a sneak peek of some seriously cool PowerCLI stuff!) and then went into some of the updates that have been made in the release. It covers the gamut from easier certificate management to automation of some settings that used to require hand-editing.

You can see in the video below that also we got LOTS of questions. And I got a bunch of questions afterwards via email and Twitter.

Participate!

If you are one of those IT folks who owns the virtual infrastructure and you’re looking to upgrade to vSphere 6 and your IT Security colleagues are challenging you to secure it, this presentation will help. I also encourage you to check out all the other vBrownbag content and even better, contribute your own! Be a part of the community. We’re all in this together and there’s NO shortage of community members that are here to help.

You can find the vBrownbag home page here and the webinar I did here.

Let me know if you have feedback. You can reach me on Twitter as @vspheresecurity or @mikefoley or you can send me email to mfoley at vmware dot com. If there’s a topic you want covered on vSphere security, send it in!

thanks,

mike

Apply Today! VMware Horizon Client for Chrome OS Early Access Program

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Apply Today! VMware Horizon Client for Chrome OS Early Access Program
Apr 302015
 
by Claude Robinson,Director End-User Computing Enterprise Software Applications and Healthcare Alliances Team VMware and Google have been working together over the last year to deliver compelling enterprise solutions to our customers. We have had the opportunity to work closely with Google to deliver a virtualization solution on Google’s Chromebook leveraging VMware End-User Computing products. Many […]]> by Claude Robinson,Director End-User Computing Enterprise Software Applications and Healthcare Alliances Team

VMware and Google have been working together over the last year to deliver compelling enterprise solutions to our customers. We have had the opportunity to work closely with Google to deliver a virtualization solution on Google’s Chromebook leveraging VMware End-User Computing products.

Many of our customers have deployed VMware Horizon and Google Chromebooks together with success to drive their businesses. A consistent question I hear from customers is, “When will Horizon hosted apps be available for Google Chromebooks?” VMware and Google have heard you, and we are excited to announce our first step to deliver hosted applications on Chromebooks. We are ready to get it into your hands.

This solution offering demonstrates the flexible delivery of hosted (or published) applications to Google Chromebooks from VMware Horizon. Enterprises can now access VMware Horizon Windows virtual desktops or hosted applications on a Chromebox or on the go from a Chromebook.


Instantly find your hosted applications with Unity Touch

Today, we are announcing an early access program that will be available for select Google and VMware customers. Apply here to be considered for trying out Google Chromebooks with VMware Horizon hosted apps. We look forward to hearing from you!

Apply Today! VMware Horizon Client for Chrome OS Early Access Program

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Apply Today! VMware Horizon Client for Chrome OS Early Access Program
Apr 302015
 
by Claude Robinson,Director End-User Computing Enterprise Software Applications and Healthcare Alliances Team VMware and Google have been working together over the last year to deliver compelling enterprise solutions to our customers. We have had the opportunity to work closely with Google to deliver a virtualization solution on Google’s Chromebook leveraging VMware End-User Computing products. Many […]]> by Claude Robinson,Director End-User Computing Enterprise Software Applications and Healthcare Alliances Team

VMware and Google have been working together over the last year to deliver compelling enterprise solutions to our customers. We have had the opportunity to work closely with Google to deliver a virtualization solution on Google’s Chromebook leveraging VMware End-User Computing products.

Many of our customers have deployed VMware Horizon and Google Chromebooks together with success to drive their businesses. A consistent question I hear from customers is, “When will Horizon hosted apps be available for Google Chromebooks?” VMware and Google have heard you, and we are excited to announce our first step to deliver hosted applications on Chromebooks. We are ready to get it into your hands.

This solution offering demonstrates the flexible delivery of hosted (or published) applications to Google Chromebooks from VMware Horizon. Enterprises can now access VMware Horizon Windows virtual desktops or hosted applications on a Chromebox or on the go from a Chromebook.


Instantly find your hosted applications with Unity Touch

Today, we are announcing an early access program that will be available for select Google and VMware customers. Apply here to be considered for trying out Google Chromebooks with VMware Horizon hosted apps. We look forward to hearing from you!

Infographic: Mid-market mobile adoption, progressive or conservative?

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Infographic: Mid-market mobile adoption, progressive or conservative?
Apr 302015
 
AirWatch and The SMB Group teamed up to create an infographic highlighting mobile solution adoption trends among mid-market companies. View the infographic here. The report surveys two types of mid-market segments: progressive and conservative adopters. Progressive adopters make up 59 percent of the mid-market and are increasing revenues and technology spending. Conservative adopters make up […]]> http://blogs.air-watch.com/2015/04/infographic-mid-market-mobile-adoption-progressive-conservative/feed/ 0 Is your enterprise video ready? http://blogs.air-watch.com/2015/04/enterprise-video-ready/ http://blogs.air-watch.com/2015/04/enterprise-video-ready/#comments Wed, 29 Apr 2015 14:24:45 +0000