vSphere 6.5 is here! What you need to know

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für vSphere 6.5 is here! What you need to know
Nov 162016
 

vSphere 6.5 has been released for all to download. We&#rsquo;re sure you vSphere users are all eager to install a copy and start kicking the tires, and we&#rsquo;re just as eager to see that you get started on the right foot. With this in mind, we have created the following list of Knowledge Base articles that are brand new, or have been updated for vSphere 6.5

First of all: Download VMware vSphere and Get Your vSphere License Key

KB articles recommended by VMware Support before you start your journey:

  • Important information before upgrading to vSphere 6.5 (2147548)
  • Update sequence for vSphere 6.5 and its compatible VMware products (2147289)
  • Supported and deprecated topologies for VMware vSphere 6.5 (2147672)
  • About vSphere Installation and Setup
  • FAQ: Support statement for 512e and 4K Native drives for VMware vSphere and vSAN (2091600)
  • Understanding Feature Accommodation between VMware vSphere 6.0 and 6.5 and vRealize Operations 5.8.x and 6.0.1 (2108695)
  • How to use vSphere 6.x Certificate Manager (2097936)
  • Network redundancy message when configuring VMware High Availability in vCenter Server (1004700)
  • Determining Network/Storage firmware and driver version in ESXi 4.x and later (1027206)Virtual Machine Encryption
  • Use Encryption in Your vSphere Environment
  • Upgrade vCenter Server in an MSCS Environment
  • ESXi 6.5 I/O driver information: certified 5.5 and 6.0 I/O drivers are compatible with vSphere 6.5 (2147697)
  • End of Availability and End of Support for FCoE on Intel Network Controllers (2147786)

 

For more details on the release please refer to the vSphere 6.5 announcement.

If you are interested in learning more about vSphere 6.5, there are several options:

  • Read more about vSphere 6.5 at the product pages
  • Experience vSphere 6.5 with our free 60-day evaluation
  • Take one of the new online or instructor-led vSphere 6.5 courses

The post vSphere 6.5 is here! What you need to know appeared first on Support Insider.

Important KB updates for current NSX for vSphere users -May 2016 Edition

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Important KB updates for current NSX for vSphere users -May 2016 Edition
Mai 042016
 

Our NSX support team would like all of our customers to know about important KB updates for current NSX for vSphere issues. Here’s what’s new and trending-

Please take note of key updates to the following important End of General Support and End of Availability events:

  • vCloud Networking and Security will reach End of Availability and End of General Support on September 19, 2016. See KB 2144733and KB article:Best practices for upgrading vCloud Networking and Security to NSX as well as the fully updated vCNS to NSX Upgrade Guide
  • vCNS to NSX Upgrade in a VCD Environment Whitepaper is now available
  • ​See also KB article:VMware vCloud Networking and Security 5.5.x supportability on ESXi 5.0.x with CVE-2014-3566 (POODLE)
  • NSX for vSphere 6.1.x will reach End of General Support on October 15, 2016. See KB 2144769
  • The recommended release for NSX for vSphere is 6.2.2. Refer to KB article:Recommended minimum version for VMware NSX for vSphere with Guest Introspection Driver, ESXi and vCenter server
  • NEW! VMware is extending the End of General Support date to three years after GA for NSX for vSphere 6.2.x only. The VMware Lifecycle Product Matrixwill be updated in May to reflect this change.

New and important issues:

  • KB 2144964– vSphere Web Client performance is slow when using NSX Manager
  • KB 2145197– Restarting NSX Manager virtual machine fails in VMware NSX for vSphere 6.x
  • KB 2135280– Unsupported commands on controllers in NSX for vSphere 6.x
  • KB 2145135– MSRPC connectivity issues with Windows 2008 and later in NSX for vSphere 6.2.x
  • KB 2144087– Backup and restore of VMware NSX for vSphere 6.x components
  • KB 2127369– Extended convergence time seen when NSX-based OSPF area border router with highest IP address is shut down or rebooted
  • When recovering from a controller failure, refer to: Recover from an NSX Controller Failurein the Installation Guide chapter of the NSX 6.2 Documentation Center
  • When selecting a teaming policy, refer only to: Configure VXLAN Transport Parameterssection in the NSX 6.2 Documentation Center
  • Before deploying NSX for vSphere 6.2.x with Universal Distributed Logical Router (UDLR), contact the NSBU. Refer to:Connectivity issues on secondary UDLR in Cross-vCenter with NSX
  • VMware Tools 10.0.8 release resolves a critical Endpoint / Guest Introspection issue. See:Slow VMs after upgrading VMware tools in NSX / vCloud Networking and Security. See also KBs 2139740, and 2144295.

NSX for Multi-Hypervisor:

  • Packet reordering in NSX for Multi-Hypervisor

New technical training:

  • See the Level 200 learning path<https://mylearn.vmware.com/portals/gsssrt/?menu=learningpaths&pathID=92378&competencyID=13596&roleID=72> and the Level 300 learning path<https://mylearn.vmware.com/portals/gsssrt/?menu=learningpaths&pathID=92377&competencyID=13596&roleID=72> for NSX-V in the VMware Technical Support University mylearn portal.

New master playbook KBs:

  • KB 2144419 VMware vRealize Automation 6.2.x /7.0.x integration with NSX for vSphere 6.x
  • KB 2140009 Understanding and troubleshooting VMware NSX for vSphere 6.x Edge appliance
  • See also the new links on the NSX Documentation Landing Page

How to track the top field issues:

  • Troubleshooting VMware NSX for vSphere 6.x
  • Trending issues and important information regarding VMware NSX for vSphere 6.x
  • Trending issues and important information regarding VMware NSX for vSphere 6.x Controller
  • Understanding and troubleshooting VMware NSX for vSphere 6.x
  • NSX Support Center
  • NSX for vSphere 6.2.2 Release Notes

 

The post Important KB updates for current NSX for vSphere users -May 2016 Edition appeared first on Support Insider.

Important NSX for vSphere KB Updates – March 2016

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Important NSX for vSphere KB Updates – March 2016
Apr 012016
 

vCloud Networking and Security will reach end of availability and end of support on September 19, 2016.

  • KB 2144733 – End of Availability and End of Support Life for VMware vCloud Networking and Security 5.5.x
  • See the fully updated vCNS to NSX Upgrade Guide
  • See also KB 2144620 – VMware vCloud Networking and Security 5.5.x upgrade to NSX for vSphere 6.2.x Best Practices
  • ​Upgrade path from vCNS 5.x: Using the NSX upgrade bundle posted on or after 31 March, 2016, you may upgrade directly from vCNS 5.1.x or vCNS 5.5.x to NSX 6.2.2 Please see the NSX 6.2.2 release notes
  • Upgrades from NSX 6.1.5 to NSX 6.2.0 are not supported. Instead, you must upgrade from NSX 6.1.5 to NSX 6.2.1 or later to avoid a regression in functionality. Refer to KB 2129200

NSX for vSphere 6.1.x will reach end of availability and end of support on October 15, 2016

  • ​KB 2144769 – End of Availability and End of Support Life for VMware NSX for vSphere 6.1.x
  • The recommended release for NSX-V is 6.2.2. Refer to KB 2144295 – Recommended minimum version for VMware NSX for vSphere with Guest Introspection Driver, ESXi and vCenter server.

New issues:

  • KB 2144726 – Service Composer fails to translate virtual machines into security-groups in VMware NSX for vSphere 6.x
  • KB 2140891 – Storage vMotion of Edge appliance disrupts VIX communication in VMware vCloud Networking and Security 5.5.x and NSX for vSphere 6.x
  • KB 2144476 – After reinstalling vCenter Server 6.0 EAM fails to push VIB’s to ESXi host with the error: Host not covered by scope anymore
  • KB 2144456 – Importing draft firewall rules fails after existing firewall configuration is removed by a REST API request
  • KB 2144387 – After upgrading to VMware NSX for vSphere 6.2.2 there is no upgrade option available for NSX Guest Introspection and NSX Data Security and the services remain at version 6.2.1
  • KB 2144420 – Any changes to the Primary UDLR result in the vNic_0 being shutdown on the Seconday UDLR in VMware Cross-vCenter NSX for vSphere 6.2.x
  • KB 2144236 – VMtools issue – Virtual machine performance issues after upgrading VMware tools version to 10.0.x in NSX/ VMware vCloud Networking and Security 5.5.x
  • KB 2144649 – IPv4 IP address do not get auto approved when SpoofGuard policy is set to Trust On First Use (TOFU) in VMware NSX for vSphere 6.2.x
  • KB 2144732 – In VMware NSX for vSphere 6.x, unpreparing Stateless ESXi host fails with the error: Agent VIB module is not installed. Cause : 15 The installation transaction failed. The transaction is not supported
  • KB 2135956 – VMware ESXi 6.0 Update 1 host fails with a purple diagnostic screen and reports the error: PANIC bora/vmkernel/main/dlmalloc.c:4923 – Usage error in dlmallocnow resolved in vSphere 6.0U2. See also the vSphere 6.0U2 Release Notes
  • KB 2126275 – Publishing Distributed Firewall (DFW) rules fails after referenced object is deleted in VMware NSX for vSphere 6.1.x and 6.2.x

Tracking the top issues:

  • Troubleshooting playbooks – KB 2122691 – Understanding and troubleshooting VMware NSX for vSphere 6.x
  • External KB 2131154 – Trending issues and important information regarding VMware NSX for vSphere 6.x
  • KB 2135498 – Trending issues and important information regarding VMware NSX for vSphere 6.x Controller
  • KB 2122691 – Understanding and troubleshooting VMware NSX for vSphere 6.x
  • NSX Support Center – https://www.vmware.com/support/nsx.html
  • NSX for vSphere 6.2.2 Release Notes

The post Important NSX for vSphere KB Updates – March 2016 appeared first on Support Insider.

Sep 162015
 

In VMware documentation, we show you how a product works, and how you can use the product to accomplish your tasks. But what about when the product isn’t working for you—when it doesn’t behave as described in the manual, or when the manual doesn’t cover a problem you encounter, or a special task you want to perform? In our procedures we try to anticipate every use case, and in our troubleshooting sections we try to foresee everything that might go wrong, but with the large and growing base of VMware users, it’s impossible to cover every situation that might occur. Every user is unique, and the number of variations—in combinations of hardware, operating systems, and use cases—is practically limitless.

One of the best resources for troubleshooting problems is the VMware Knowledge Base. Maintained by VMware Global Support Services team, the Knowledge Base (KB) contains thousands of articles authored by GSS support techs, product development and QA engineers, and Technical Communications writers. KB articles specialize in corner cases, troubleshooting, workarounds, and more. Thorny, corner-case problems are usually solved only through considerable effort, collaboration, and head pounding by some very smart and knowledgeable people. KB articles document those solutions, so no one should have to struggle with solving the same problems again.

And note: when you search the Knowledge Base, you’re searching not only KB articles, but also the library of product documentation and discussion threads in VMware Communities. This makes the Knowledge Base a great place to begin looking for answers.

So how do you use the Knowledge Base? Just go to http://kb.vmware.com/ and you’ll find that it’s pretty self-explanatory. You can browse or search by keyword, and you can filter the search by product. And if you need more detailed instructions or help, the Knowledge Base itself is well documented (just as you would expect) in a KB article—just click the Knowledge Base Help button in the upper right of the KB home window.

I will add one tip for searching: when I enter search terms, I start by trying to identify as uniquely as I can the symptoms and setup of the problem I’ve encountered—I might include the essential words of an error message, the operating system version of the VM, what seemed to trigger the problem—whatever might help filter the search to the results most likely to match my problem exactly. I err on the side of inclusiveness, using as many relevant keywords as I can. Sometimes, I get lucky and find my problem on the first try. More likely, I get no results, or just a few. So I start deleting terms, one by one, from the search. With every deletion, the search broadens, and I get more results to scan through.

One more note: be sure to take a look at the navigation bar on the right-hand side of the KB home page, where there are links to some other really great tools and services provided by the KB team, including:

  • KBTV, an ongoing series of how-to videos
  • the Weekly KB Digest, where you can check for the newest additions to the Knowledge Base

You can subscribe to KBTV, the Weekly Digest and the KB Blog via RSS, and you can follow us on Twitter at: @VMwarecares.

In short, whenever you need answers, try the Knowledge Base. It’s a terrific resource.

The post The VMware Knowledge Base appeared first on Support Insider.

Sep 162015
 
In VMware documentation, we show you how a product works, and how you can use the product to accomplish your tasks. But what about when the product isn’t working for you—when it doesn’t...

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Horizon View troubleshooting, upgrading to vSphere 6.0, invalid linked clones and more from Global Support Services

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Horizon View troubleshooting, upgrading to vSphere 6.0, invalid linked clones and more from Global Support Services
Sep 042015
 

Each month, we share the top VMware Global Support Services (GSS) news, alerts, and announcements from our sister blog, VMware Support Insider. Read on to find out what you might have missed.

Disk is already managed by View
Check out this post highlighting a Knowledge Base (KB) article that troubleshoots a common issue for Horizon View customers. The “This disk is already managed by View” error message can occur if the ADAM database contains an invalid entry for a persistent disk.

Database issues when upgrading vSphere
Experiencing difficulties with database validation when upgrading to vSphere 6.0? This entry has a list of previous posts that troubleshoot specific database issues.

Invalid Linked Clones – revisited
For users of Horizon View 5.2 or earlier that need to remove invalid linked clones, read this blog post for information on how to manually delete linked clones or stale virtual desktop entries from the View Composer database in VMware View Manager and VMware Horizon View.

Top 20 Articles for July 2015
Traveling or super busy this past month? Here are the top 20 KB articles for July 2015 in case you missed it.

Follow VMware GSS
Stay up to date on all things support by following these social media channels:

  • Support Insider Blog
  • @VMwareCares on Twitter
  • VMware Cares on Facebook

The post Horizon View troubleshooting, upgrading to vSphere 6.0, invalid linked clones and more from Global Support Services appeared first on VMware Education and Certification Blog.

Support for Web Client issues in vSphere 6, ESX/ESXi host hardware compatibility, SSL certificate and more from Global Support Services!

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Support for Web Client issues in vSphere 6, ESX/ESXi host hardware compatibility, SSL certificate and more from Global Support Services!
Aug 072015
 

Each month, we share the top VMware Global Support Services (GSS) news, alerts, and announcements from our sister blog, VMware Support Insider. Read on to find out what you might have missed.

Web Client issues in vSphere 6
Recently upgraded to the latest version of our vSphere Web Client? Troubleshoot some common issues that we have received from customers with vSphere 6 in this blog post.

How to confirm ESX and ESXi host hardware compatibility
Watch our latest video to learn how to confirm ESX and ESXi host hardware compatibility using the VMware Hardware Compatibility Guides.

SSL certificate issues in VMware Horizon View
Having difficulty with your SSL certificates in the product configuration for Horizon View? Look no further! Enjoy our troubleshooting KB article, written by our support engineers, to cover all the common configuration issues in this blog post.

Here is a list of all the Supporter Insider blog posts from last month:

  • Issuing a 3rd party SSL certificate to vCenter while using vSphere VMCA to issue certificates to ESXi
  • How to create a Microsoft Certificate Authority Template for SSL certificate creation in vSphere 6
  • vCloud Connector and Datacenter Extension - KBTV Webinars
  • Unable to access Administration and Licensing in vSphere Web Client
  • ALERT: When removing CPU from VM configuration hard disks and nic are removed
  • Scan and fix provisioning errors with ViewDbChk tool
  • Top 20 Articles for June 2015
  • KBTV Webinars - How to connect your Datacentre to vCloud Air over IPsec VPN

Follow VMware GSS
Stay up to date on all things support by following these social media channels:

  • Support Insider Blog
  • @VMwareCares on Twitter
  • VMware Cares on Facebook

Support for Web Client issues in vSphere 6, ESX/ESXi host hardware compatibility, SSL certificate and more from Global Support Services!

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Support for Web Client issues in vSphere 6, ESX/ESXi host hardware compatibility, SSL certificate and more from Global Support Services!
Aug 072015
 

Each month, we share the top VMware Global Support Services (GSS) news, alerts, and announcements from our sister blog, VMware Support Insider. Read on to find out what you might have missed.

Web Client issues in vSphere 6
Recently upgraded to the latest version of our vSphere Web Client? Troubleshoot some common issues that we have received from customers with vSphere 6 in this blog post.

How to confirm ESX and ESXi host hardware compatibility
Watch our latest video to learn how to confirm ESX and ESXi host hardware compatibility using the VMware Hardware Compatibility Guides.

SSL certificate issues in VMware Horizon View
Having difficulty with your SSL certificates in the product configuration for Horizon View? Look no further! Enjoy our troubleshooting KB article, written by our support engineers, to cover all the common configuration issues in this blog post.

Here is a list of all the Supporter Insider blog posts from last month:

  • Issuing a 3rd party SSL certificate to vCenter while using vSphere VMCA to issue certificates to ESXi
  • How to create a Microsoft Certificate Authority Template for SSL certificate creation in vSphere 6
  • vCloud Connector and Datacenter Extension - KBTV Webinars
  • Unable to access Administration and Licensing in vSphere Web Client
  • ALERT: When removing CPU from VM configuration hard disks and nic are removed
  • Scan and fix provisioning errors with ViewDbChk tool
  • Top 20 Articles for June 2015
  • KBTV Webinars - How to connect your Datacentre to vCloud Air over IPsec VPN

Follow VMware GSS
Stay up to date on all things support by following these social media channels:

  • Support Insider Blog
  • @VMwareCares on Twitter
  • VMware Cares on Facebook

How to Troubleshoot an App Volumes Environment, Part 2

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für How to Troubleshoot an App Volumes Environment, Part 2
Jul 272015
 
By Gina Daly, Technical Writer for Technical Marketing, End-User Computing, VMware With significant contributions from: Stephane Asselin, Senior End-User-Computing Architect, Technical Enablement, End-User Computing, VMware Jason Marshall, Manager, Product Engineering, End-User Computing, VMware Andrew Johnson, Senior Manager and Staff Architect, EUC Technical Marketing and Enablement, VMware Welcome to part 2 of How to Troubleshoot an […]]> By Gina Daly, Technical Writer for Technical Marketing, End-User Computing, VMware

With significant contributions from:

Stephane Asselin, Senior End-User-Computing Architect, Technical Enablement, End-User Computing, VMware

Jason Marshall, Manager, Product Engineering, End-User Computing, VMware

Andrew Johnson, Senior Manager and Staff Architect, EUC Technical Marketing and Enablement, VMware

Welcome to part 2 of How to Troubleshoot an App Volumes Environment. We are discussing steps to take when diagnosing an issue in your environment. Let us run through a quick recap. In part 1 of How to Troubleshoot an App Volumes Environment, we covered checking deployment requirements, how to find clues on the App Volumes Manager console, using log analysis tools, and knowing what to search for in the logs.


App Volumes Troubleshooting Steps

This blog covers using the Ruby on Rails console and the SQL database to verify configuration details and environment settings, and lists the relevant Knowledge Base articles to use.

Let us take a look at the next step.

  1. Use the Ruby on Rails console to query configuration information directly.

You can use the Ruby on Rails console to execute queries and run scripts. The most common use case is to look at an internal object that may not be fully displayed in the App Volumes Manager console, for example, if an AppStack is not correctly displaying the machines or users it is attached to. However, it is advisable to use this tool with caution, as modifying values here could have a serious effect on your environment. If you are unfamiliar with the Ruby console, it would be wise to practice running commands in a test setup before applying changes in a production setup.

You can launch the Ruby console from a Windows command prompt on the App Volumes Manager server. Navigate to C:\Program Files (x86)\CloudVolumes\Manager and enter

svmanager_run script\rails console

After the Ruby on Rails console loads, you can run a number of commands to confirm configuration details. For example, to list all the App Volumes Agent machines in your environment, enter ap Machine.all. You need to prefix all commands with "ap" to make the output readable. (The "ap" prefix stands for "awesome print" and results in verbose text.)

If you are new to Rails, or want to learn about Rails in general, see the Ruby on Rails Guides. Alternatively, to get straight into the command line options, see A Guide to the Rails Command Line.

Further details are discussed in Troubleshooting VMware App Volumes using the Ruby on Rails console.

  1. Query information in the SQL database.

Finally, you can query SQL database contents to help analyze your App Volumes environment. Again, you need to access this database from the App Volumes Manager server. To do this, launch SQL Management Studio Server and connect to the App Volumes SQL database.

Let us take a look at a scenario where the user logs into an App Volumes Agent machine and is not presented with any AppStacks. Each App Volumes Agent machine has an identifier and BIOS_UUID value in the dbo.machines table.


App Volumes SQL Database Listing BIOS_UUID for Agent Machines

This value is sent to the vCenter Server where there is a corresponding virtual machine in the dbo.VPX_VM table (in the vCenter Server database). If vCenter Server cannot find the matching BIOS_UUID after 5 minutes, a timeout occurs, and the user is presented with a virtual machine with no AppStacks attached. You can check values from the App Volumes database and verify if the matching value is in the vCenter Server database.


Searching for BIOS UUID Value in vCenter Server SQL Database

Details are discussed in Troubleshooting VMware App Volumes using the SQL database.

You can be creative with the queries, and, of course, it is helpful to have a SQL expert handy if you are not familiar with SQL commands.

Summary

To summarize, the final steps to follow when troubleshooting your App Volumes environment are:

  1. Use the Ruby on Rails console to query configuration information directly.
    KB: Troubleshooting VMware App Volumes using the Ruby on Rails console
  2. Query information in the SQL database.
    KB: Troubleshooting VMware App Volumes using the SQL database

It should be plain sailing from this point, but if you do need further assistance, lower your anchor and reach out to our Technical Support teams. You already have most of the groundwork done. Providing relevant log files and steps taken should allow for a speedy diagnosis and resolution.

How to Troubleshoot an App Volumes Environment, Part 2

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für How to Troubleshoot an App Volumes Environment, Part 2
Jul 272015
 
By Gina Daly, Technical Writer for Technical Marketing, End-User Computing, VMware With significant contributions from: Stephane Asselin, Senior End-User-Computing Architect, Technical Enablement, End-User Computing, VMware Jason Marshall, Manager, Product Engineering, End-User Computing, VMware Andrew Johnson, Senior Manager and Staff Architect, EUC Technical Marketing and Enablement, VMware Welcome to part 2 of How to Troubleshoot an […]]> By Gina Daly, Technical Writer for Technical Marketing, End-User Computing, VMware

With significant contributions from:

Stephane Asselin, Senior End-User-Computing Architect, Technical Enablement, End-User Computing, VMware

Jason Marshall, Manager, Product Engineering, End-User Computing, VMware

Andrew Johnson, Senior Manager and Staff Architect, EUC Technical Marketing and Enablement, VMware

Welcome to part 2 of How to Troubleshoot an App Volumes Environment. We are discussing steps to take when diagnosing an issue in your environment. Let us run through a quick recap. In part 1 of How to Troubleshoot an App Volumes Environment, we covered checking deployment requirements, how to find clues on the App Volumes Manager console, using log analysis tools, and knowing what to search for in the logs.


App Volumes Troubleshooting Steps

This blog covers using the Ruby on Rails console and the SQL database to verify configuration details and environment settings, and lists the relevant Knowledge Base articles to use.

Let us take a look at the next step.

  1. Use the Ruby on Rails console to query configuration information directly.

You can use the Ruby on Rails console to execute queries and run scripts. The most common use case is to look at an internal object that may not be fully displayed in the App Volumes Manager console, for example, if an AppStack is not correctly displaying the machines or users it is attached to. However, it is advisable to use this tool with caution, as modifying values here could have a serious effect on your environment. If you are unfamiliar with the Ruby console, it would be wise to practice running commands in a test setup before applying changes in a production setup.

You can launch the Ruby console from a Windows command prompt on the App Volumes Manager server. Navigate to C:\Program Files (x86)\CloudVolumes\Manager and enter

svmanager_run script\rails console

After the Ruby on Rails console loads, you can run a number of commands to confirm configuration details. For example, to list all the App Volumes Agent machines in your environment, enter ap Machine.all. You need to prefix all commands with "ap" to make the output readable. (The "ap" prefix stands for "awesome print" and results in verbose text.)

If you are new to Rails, or want to learn about Rails in general, see the Ruby on Rails Guides. Alternatively, to get straight into the command line options, see A Guide to the Rails Command Line.

Further details are discussed in Troubleshooting VMware App Volumes using the Ruby on Rails console.

  1. Query information in the SQL database.

Finally, you can query SQL database contents to help analyze your App Volumes environment. Again, you need to access this database from the App Volumes Manager server. To do this, launch SQL Management Studio Server and connect to the App Volumes SQL database.

Let us take a look at a scenario where the user logs into an App Volumes Agent machine and is not presented with any AppStacks. Each App Volumes Agent machine has an identifier and BIOS_UUID value in the dbo.machines table.


App Volumes SQL Database Listing BIOS_UUID for Agent Machines

This value is sent to the vCenter Server where there is a corresponding virtual machine in the dbo.VPX_VM table (in the vCenter Server database). If vCenter Server cannot find the matching BIOS_UUID after 5 minutes, a timeout occurs, and the user is presented with a virtual machine with no AppStacks attached. You can check values from the App Volumes database and verify if the matching value is in the vCenter Server database.


Searching for BIOS UUID Value in vCenter Server SQL Database

Details are discussed in Troubleshooting VMware App Volumes using the SQL database.

You can be creative with the queries, and, of course, it is helpful to have a SQL expert handy if you are not familiar with SQL commands.

Summary

To summarize, the final steps to follow when troubleshooting your App Volumes environment are:

  1. Use the Ruby on Rails console to query configuration information directly.
    KB: Troubleshooting VMware App Volumes using the Ruby on Rails console
  2. Query information in the SQL database.
    KB: Troubleshooting VMware App Volumes using the SQL database

It should be plain sailing from this point, but if you do need further assistance, lower your anchor and reach out to our Technical Support teams. You already have most of the groundwork done. Providing relevant log files and steps taken should allow for a speedy diagnosis and resolution.

How to Troubleshoot an App Volumes Environment, Part 1

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für How to Troubleshoot an App Volumes Environment, Part 1
Jul 272015
 
By Gina Daly, Technical Writer for Technical Marketing, End-User Computing, VMware With significant contributions from: Stephane Asselin, Senior End-User-Computing Architect, Technical Enablement, End-User Computing, VMware Jason Marshall, Manager, Product Engineering, End-User Computing, VMware Andrew Johnson, Senior Manager and Staff Architect, End-User-Computing Technical Marketing and Enablement, VMware My father was a naval officer and taught me […]]> By Gina Daly, Technical Writer for Technical Marketing, End-User Computing, VMware

With significant contributions from:

Stephane Asselin, Senior End-User-Computing Architect, Technical Enablement, End-User Computing, VMware

Jason Marshall, Manager, Product Engineering, End-User Computing, VMware

Andrew Johnson, Senior Manager and Staff Architect, End-User-Computing Technical Marketing and Enablement, VMware

My father was a naval officer and taught me many things about the sea. Did you know, in comparison to the size of a ship, only a very small helm or wheel is needed to steer this ship? In an App Volumes environment with various components, it can sometimes be difficult to know where to start troubleshooting. We have recently published a number of Knowledge Base (KB) articles to steer you in the right direction, just like that helm. Our aim is to simplify App Volumes troubleshooting and help pinpoint the issue, should you encounter stormy waters!

General App Volumes Troubleshooting Overview

The following diagram provides a list of general troubleshooting steps. In this blog, we discuss the first four steps. Within each step description, links to the corresponding KB articles are included. Using the Ruby on Rails console and SQL database will be covered in the next blog post, How to Troubleshoot an App Volumes Environment, Part 2.


Figure 1: App Volumes Troubleshooting Steps

  1. Check deployment requirements and port connectivity.

It is vital to know the system requirements for installation and deployment. A solid structure needs a solid foundation, and the deployment requirements are the foundation for your App Volumes environment. The KB article VMware App Volumes deployment requirements has a useful reference table listing the basic deployment requirements, along with other items to check, such as Active Directory (AD) and vCenter Server permissions.

Port connectivity is equally important, particularly if a firewall exists between system components. Network connectivity requirements for App Volumes 2.5.x and later lists the necessary ports. You can eliminate simple misconfiguration issues by checking the basics.

Another handy KB for checking App Volumes configurations is Confirming VMware App Volumes environment information from registry entries. You can easily scan details such as the product version, SQL database name, and HTTP ports used, all from a single location in the registry.

  1. Check the App Volumes Manager console—specifically the Dashboard and Activity tabs.

There are two tabs on the App Volumes Manager console that give you quick insight into possible issues in your environment. At a glance, the Dashboard tab displays information such as how many licenses are in use, AppStack utilization details, and most recent events in your environment. Hovering the mouse over any of these tables displays real-time statistics. From the Activity tab, you can access the activity and server log files without having to generate a log bundle. System errors can be seen from the System Messages tab within the Activity tab.


Figure 2: VMware App Volumes Activity Tab

More details are in the KB article Troubleshooting VMware App Volumes through the App Volumes Manager console.

  1. Use a log analysis tool to check various log files.

Scrolling through log files can be a tedious task. Using a log analysis tool such as BareTail, or even a text editor such as Notepad++, can simplify this task.


Figure 3: Analyzing Log File with BareTail

Use these tools to investigate the App Volumes Manager production log, the App Volumes Agent logs, and the ESXi service log. The KB article Location of VMware App Volumes log files describes how and where to find the relevant logs, and VMware log analysis tools and log analysis examples gives examples of how to use the log analysis tools to solve problems.

  1. Understand what should be in the logs.

Of course, when searching through log files, it is helpful to know what you are looking for, what is expected behavior, and where the red flags are. We have all been in this predicament—we diligently search the log files for an “error” string, find the “error,” and are still none the wiser after the fact! VMware log analysis tools and log analysis examples describes the relevant search terms, how to recognize an error, and even provides log analysis examples for you to follow.

Let us take a look at the production.log file on the App Volumes Manager server, which contains logging from the main App Volumes modules. Here are the App Volumes modules you can search for, along with their descriptions.

  • RADIR: RubyActiveDIRectory classes – Responsible for AD connection
  • Cvo: App Volumes logic classes
  • RvSphere: RubyvSphere wrapper classes
  • SQL: Database queries (Default logging only captures errors. Debug logging captures queries and errors.)
  • PowerShell: App Volumes PowerShell interface classes
  • NTLM: App Volumes NTLM handler

In the following log excerpt, we can see the RADIR module next to a successful AD connection message.


Figure 4: Analyzing App Volumes Production Log

Each line in the log file gives us the process ID (PID) on the left side, and tells us whether it is an active request (PxxxxRxx) or a delayed job (PxxxxDJ).


Figure 5: Checking Process ID in App Volumes Production Log

To whet your appetite, here is a list of the log analysis examples in VMware App Volumes log analysis tools and log analysis examples. In each situation, we look at what is recorded in the logs, so you can determine the point of failure when provisioning an AppStack, for example. In the case of an unreachable component, we discuss the observed behavior in your environment, and which log file and search string to check for in each scenario.

  • Provision a new AppStack and monitor progress
  • Create a new writable volume and monitor progress
  • App Volumes Manager unreachable
  • SQL database unreachable
  • Active Directory unreachable
  • vCenter Server unreachable

In summary, here are the steps and relevant KB articles to follow when troubleshooting your App Volumes issues.

  1. Check deployment requirements and port connectivity.
    • KB: VMware App Volumes deployment requirements
    • KB: Network connectivity requirements for App Volumes 2.5.x and later
    • KB: Confirming App Volumes environment information from registry entries
  1. Check the App Volumes Manager console — specifically the Dashboard and Activity tabs.
    • KB: Troubleshooting VMware App Volumes through the App Volumes Manager console
  1. Use a log analysis tool to check various log files.
    • KB: Location of VMware App Volumes log files
    • KB: VMware App Volumes log analysis tools and log analysis examples
  1. Understand what should be in the logs.
    • KB: VMware App Volumes log analysis tools and log analysis examples

Sail on to part 2 of this blog, How to Troubleshoot an App Volumes Environment, Part 2, where we continue our journey and cover the remaining steps: using the Ruby on Rails console and SQL database to troubleshoot an App Volumes environment.

How to Troubleshoot an App Volumes Environment, Part 1

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für How to Troubleshoot an App Volumes Environment, Part 1
Jul 272015
 
By Gina Daly, Technical Writer for Technical Marketing, End-User Computing, VMware With significant contributions from: Stephane Asselin, Senior End-User-Computing Architect, Technical Enablement, End-User Computing, VMware Jason Marshall, Manager, Product Engineering, End-User Computing, VMware Andrew Johnson, Senior Manager and Staff Architect, End-User-Computing Technical Marketing and Enablement, VMware My father was a naval officer and taught me […]]> By Gina Daly, Technical Writer for Technical Marketing, End-User Computing, VMware

With significant contributions from:

Stephane Asselin, Senior End-User-Computing Architect, Technical Enablement, End-User Computing, VMware

Jason Marshall, Manager, Product Engineering, End-User Computing, VMware

Andrew Johnson, Senior Manager and Staff Architect, End-User-Computing Technical Marketing and Enablement, VMware

My father was a naval officer and taught me many things about the sea. Did you know, in comparison to the size of a ship, only a very small helm or wheel is needed to steer this ship? In an App Volumes environment with various components, it can sometimes be difficult to know where to start troubleshooting. We have recently published a number of Knowledge Base (KB) articles to steer you in the right direction, just like that helm. Our aim is to simplify App Volumes troubleshooting and help pinpoint the issue, should you encounter stormy waters!

General App Volumes Troubleshooting Overview

The following diagram provides a list of general troubleshooting steps. In this blog, we discuss the first four steps. Within each step description, links to the corresponding KB articles are included. Using the Ruby on Rails console and SQL database will be covered in the next blog post, How to Troubleshoot an App Volumes Environment, Part 2.


Figure 1: App Volumes Troubleshooting Steps

  1. Check deployment requirements and port connectivity.

It is vital to know the system requirements for installation and deployment. A solid structure needs a solid foundation, and the deployment requirements are the foundation for your App Volumes environment. The KB article VMware App Volumes deployment requirements has a useful reference table listing the basic deployment requirements, along with other items to check, such as Active Directory (AD) and vCenter Server permissions.

Port connectivity is equally important, particularly if a firewall exists between system components. Network connectivity requirements for App Volumes 2.5.x and later lists the necessary ports. You can eliminate simple misconfiguration issues by checking the basics.

Another handy KB for checking App Volumes configurations is Confirming VMware App Volumes environment information from registry entries. You can easily scan details such as the product version, SQL database name, and HTTP ports used, all from a single location in the registry.

  1. Check the App Volumes Manager console—specifically the Dashboard and Activity tabs.

There are two tabs on the App Volumes Manager console that give you quick insight into possible issues in your environment. At a glance, the Dashboard tab displays information such as how many licenses are in use, AppStack utilization details, and most recent events in your environment. Hovering the mouse over any of these tables displays real-time statistics. From the Activity tab, you can access the activity and server log files without having to generate a log bundle. System errors can be seen from the System Messages tab within the Activity tab.


Figure 2: VMware App Volumes Activity Tab

More details are in the KB article Troubleshooting VMware App Volumes through the App Volumes Manager console.

  1. Use a log analysis tool to check various log files.

Scrolling through log files can be a tedious task. Using a log analysis tool such as BareTail, or even a text editor such as Notepad++, can simplify this task.


Figure 3: Analyzing Log File with BareTail

Use these tools to investigate the App Volumes Manager production log, the App Volumes Agent logs, and the ESXi service log. The KB article Location of VMware App Volumes log files describes how and where to find the relevant logs, and VMware log analysis tools and log analysis examples gives examples of how to use the log analysis tools to solve problems.

  1. Understand what should be in the logs.

Of course, when searching through log files, it is helpful to know what you are looking for, what is expected behavior, and where the red flags are. We have all been in this predicament—we diligently search the log files for an “error” string, find the “error,” and are still none the wiser after the fact! VMware log analysis tools and log analysis examples describes the relevant search terms, how to recognize an error, and even provides log analysis examples for you to follow.

Let us take a look at the production.log file on the App Volumes Manager server, which contains logging from the main App Volumes modules. Here are the App Volumes modules you can search for, along with their descriptions.

  • RADIR: RubyActiveDIRectory classes – Responsible for AD connection
  • Cvo: App Volumes logic classes
  • RvSphere: RubyvSphere wrapper classes
  • SQL: Database queries (Default logging only captures errors. Debug logging captures queries and errors.)
  • PowerShell: App Volumes PowerShell interface classes
  • NTLM: App Volumes NTLM handler

In the following log excerpt, we can see the RADIR module next to a successful AD connection message.


Figure 4: Analyzing App Volumes Production Log

Each line in the log file gives us the process ID (PID) on the left side, and tells us whether it is an active request (PxxxxRxx) or a delayed job (PxxxxDJ).


Figure 5: Checking Process ID in App Volumes Production Log

To whet your appetite, here is a list of the log analysis examples in VMware App Volumes log analysis tools and log analysis examples. In each situation, we look at what is recorded in the logs, so you can determine the point of failure when provisioning an AppStack, for example. In the case of an unreachable component, we discuss the observed behavior in your environment, and which log file and search string to check for in each scenario.

  • Provision a new AppStack and monitor progress
  • Create a new writable volume and monitor progress
  • App Volumes Manager unreachable
  • SQL database unreachable
  • Active Directory unreachable
  • vCenter Server unreachable

In summary, here are the steps and relevant KB articles to follow when troubleshooting your App Volumes issues.

  1. Check deployment requirements and port connectivity.
    • KB: VMware App Volumes deployment requirements
    • KB: Network connectivity requirements for App Volumes 2.5.x and later
    • KB: Confirming App Volumes environment information from registry entries
  1. Check the App Volumes Manager console — specifically the Dashboard and Activity tabs.
    • KB: Troubleshooting VMware App Volumes through the App Volumes Manager console
  1. Use a log analysis tool to check various log files.
    • KB: Location of VMware App Volumes log files
    • KB: VMware App Volumes log analysis tools and log analysis examples
  1. Understand what should be in the logs.
    • KB: VMware App Volumes log analysis tools and log analysis examples

Sail on to part 2 of this blog, How to Troubleshoot an App Volumes Environment, Part 2, where we continue our journey and cover the remaining steps: using the Ruby on Rails console and SQL database to troubleshoot an App Volumes environment.

Support for Leap Seconds, KBTV Webinars, Top KB Articles, and more from Global Support Services

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Support for Leap Seconds, KBTV Webinars, Top KB Articles, and more from Global Support Services
Jul 032015
 

Each month, we share the top VMware Global Support Services (GSS) news, alerts, and announcements from our sister blog, VMware Support Insider. Read on to find out what you might have missed.

ALERT: Support for Leap Seconds in VMware Products
Are you wondering if the recently added leap second will have any impact on VMware products? Be sure to review the Support for Leap Seconds in VMware Products Knowledge Base (KB) article to learn about known issues and the recommended solutions for VMware products.

KBTV Webinars:
The latest installments of the KBTV webinar series are now available:

  • What's new in VMware vSphere 6 - KBTV Webinars: Find out what’s new in VMware vSphere 6 and what has changed since the vSphere 5.5 product release.
  • KBTV Webinars - SSL certificate handling in VMware vSphere 6: Get an overview of what’s new in VMware vSphere 6 for SSL, VMware Certificate Authority, VMware Endpoint Certificate Store, and more.

Top 20 Articles for May 2015
Check out the latest list of top issues that your peers are facing and the resolution for each. And if you’re a VMware Horizon View user, there’s a specific list just for you: Top 30 Horizon with View KB articles

Follow VMware GSS
Stay up to date on all things support by following these social media channels:

  • Support Insider Blog
  • @VMwareCares on Twitter
  • VMware Cares on Facebook

Support for Leap Seconds, KBTV Webinars, Top KB Articles, and more from Global Support Services

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Support for Leap Seconds, KBTV Webinars, Top KB Articles, and more from Global Support Services
Jul 032015
 

Each month, we share the top VMware Global Support Services (GSS) news, alerts, and announcements from our sister blog, VMware Support Insider. Read on to find out what you might have missed.

ALERT: Support for Leap Seconds in VMware Products
Are you wondering if the recently added leap second will have any impact on VMware products? Be sure to review the Support for Leap Seconds in VMware Products Knowledge Base (KB) article to learn about known issues and the recommended solutions for VMware products.

KBTV Webinars:
The latest installments of the KBTV webinar series are now available:

  • What's new in VMware vSphere 6 - KBTV Webinars: Find out what’s new in VMware vSphere 6 and what has changed since the vSphere 5.5 product release.
  • KBTV Webinars - SSL certificate handling in VMware vSphere 6: Get an overview of what’s new in VMware vSphere 6 for SSL, VMware Certificate Authority, VMware Endpoint Certificate Store, and more.

Top 20 Articles for May 2015
Check out the latest list of top issues that your peers are facing and the resolution for each. And if you’re a VMware Horizon View user, there’s a specific list just for you: Top 30 Horizon with View KB articles

Follow VMware GSS
Stay up to date on all things support by following these social media channels:

  • Support Insider Blog
  • @VMwareCares on Twitter
  • VMware Cares on Facebook

Getting vSphere 6 off the ground and more from Global Support Services

 Allgemein, Knowledge Base, Updates, VMware, VMware Partner, VMware Virtual Infrastructure, vSphere  Kommentare deaktiviert für Getting vSphere 6 off the ground and more from Global Support Services
Mai 292015
 

Each month, we’ll share the top VMware Global Support Services (GSS) news, alerts, and announcements from our sister blog, VMware Support Insider. Read on to find out what you might have missed last month.

Fresh vSphere 6 KB articles!
With vSphere 6 out for a few weeks, we’ve put together some brand new Knowledge Base articles addressing the customer feedback we’ve received so far. Take a look to see if they answer your vSphere 6 questions—and if not, let us know!

How to install vSphere 6 ESXi using the Interactive Installer
Installing vSphere 6 for a smaller deployment? This video offers step-by-step instructions on using the Interactive Installer for deployments of four or fewer hosts.

Maintaining the vCenter Server Database
Check out the latest video in our webinar series to get a high level overview of the vCenter Server Database architecture, plus best practices and tips for maintaining the database.

Introduction to VMware vRealize Orchestrator 6 - KBTV Webinars
Want more from our free webinar series? This video covers vRealize Orchestrator 6: how to install and configure it, how to create a simple workflow, and more.

Additional Posts:

  • Introduction to VMware NSX - KBTV Webinars
  • How to setup mirrored folders between your Mac and Fusion VM
  • Overview of Storage I/O Control (SIOC) - KBTV Webinars
  • ALERT: vSphere Web Client 5.0 fails to load
  • ALERT: Virtual Machines on VXLAN Wires may be unable to communicate across hosts with their Edges or Distributed Routers
  • Top 20 Articles for April 2015

Follow VMware GSS
Stay up to date on all things support by following these social media channels:

  • Support Insider Blog
  • @VMwareCares on Twitter
  • VMware Cares on Facebook